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Period RACE CAR Images to Relieve some of the Stress


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Three or four years ago a good friend and next-door neighbor at Hershey, opened the back door of his trailer and pulled out this seat. I just froze and asked were he got it. "Ford auction of extra parts at Greenfield Village", it never made contact with the Hershey black top. There is a center line in pencil, is it an original from the restored two place racer in the Henry Ford? Bob 

 

 

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I FOUND it! (In spite of an incredibly bad search function?) And it was just a bit over a month ago. 

The thread is a bit long, although not as long as 26 pages in this thread? Anyone with an interest in early racing cars in general, Fords or model K in particular, or automotive history from down under, should check it out.

 

https://mtfca.com/phpBB3/viewtopic.php?f=2&t=19612&p=149994#p149994

 

One of the most interesting parts of the story, is the fact that a 1906 non-professionally built racing car was still being raced seriously in the early 1920s. Not only that, but the reporters of the day seemed somewhat unaware of the car's real age, and called it a "purpose built Ford racing car", which it in fact was not.

 

So many great stories to be found in history!

With the rapid technological advances in automotive design those fifteen years? It would be like racing a car today as it was built in the 1950s!

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6 hours ago, wayne sheldon said:

I FOUND it! (In spite of an incredibly bad search function?) And it was just a bit over a month ago. 

The thread is a bit long, although not as long as 26 pages in this thread? Anyone with an interest in early racing cars in general, Fords or model K in particular, or automotive history from down under, should check it out.

 

https://mtfca.com/phpBB3/viewtopic.php?f=2&t=19612&p=149994#p149994

 

One of the most interesting parts of the story, is the fact that a 1906 non-professionally built racing car was still being raced seriously in the early 1920s. Not only that, but the reporters of the day seemed somewhat unaware of the car's real age, and called it a "purpose built Ford racing car", which it in fact was not.

 

So many great stories to be found in history!

With the rapid technological advances in automotive design those fifteen years? It would be like racing a car today as it was built in the 1950s!

 

AS a follow up to all that parts or all of at least three cars that competed in the NZ Motor Cup in the 1920s have survived. The Stutz survived mostly intact and was restored many years ago and is in the Southward Museum.

 

The Craig Packard mentioned in the results is this car - restored many years ago by Tom Cloudsley - using the surviving mechanicals of the Craig car.

 

 

IMG_3375 resize.JPG

 

Another car that raced at Muriwai was a Series 6 Mercer.  Its mechanicals survived and with some parts from Australia this one was built up in the 1990s.

 

 

6.JPG

 

The Mercer has been for sale for quite a while - 1923 Other Mercer Series 6 Raceabout | Trade Me Motors

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Thank you nz, John Stokes of New Zealand also posted a recent photo of the winning Cadillac from the 1921 race in the MTFCA forum.

Somewhere, I had read of the Packard pieces being used in a restoration. Along with a Stutz and a Mercer, quite a bit of that racing history is still around for us to see!

 

While the recent photos are not 'period photos', it is good to see some of what survives to this day.

 

 

The winning Cadillac 1921.jpg

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On 4/28/2021 at 1:29 AM, 1937hd45 said:

is it an original from the restored two place racer in the Henry Ford?

Bob, I think, as you already know, without provenance, there is no way to prove or disprove anything about this seat. It certainly looks old and certainly resembles the seats on some of the Ford racers. You could contact The Henry Ford and maybe talk to someone there who could shed some light on this purchase but even then, all you have is here say. If you believe it is an original from one of the early Ford racers, that's really what matters; no one can prove you wrong, and I doubt its for sale. It is a great piece and I for one, am grateful you shared it.

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The make of this is Stoewer, I have no other information, seems to date from at least the 1920s. I welcome comments as to what model, engine, and any other details.

Stoewer RACE CAR.jpg

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Posted (edited)

Walt,

 

I don't know about the picture but the car is most likely pre 15. It is right hand drive and the shifter and brake are outside the frame. By 1915, almost all cars were center controlled and left hand drive. We'll have to see if some research can turn up any further details.

 

Actually, a quick search produced the Stoewer Sewing Machine company in Germany and they went into the automobile manufacturing business early in the last century. A few examples exist.

Edited by AHa (see edit history)
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Staver built a small number of " factory " race cars. Three for sure, perhaps as many as 4 or 5 . They all look very similar to each other so I have never been able to tell one from another. But yes , they could be the same car. I don't have enough good , clear photo's to attempt to spot any possible differences between them,

Edited by 1912Staver (see edit history)
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  • 2 weeks later...

Here is a photo that shows Staver's team. 3 cars, plus several people. Once again I believe this is the 1911 Elgin races. These are all the small Staver , 30 HP. But at least a couple of 35 or 40 HP racers were also built.image.png.0a65a1c8b1c7acf5d0998597247bf041.png

 

 

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hoot

 

Historian Robert Cunningham has added the following: “His trip was from San Francisco through Yosemite National Park to New York City. Petzel financed his trip across the Lincoln Highway by peddling picture postcards of himself in his racer. Later, in October 1926, Petzel drove the racer over the Ascot Speedway where he was clocked at a record-setting speed of 92 miles per hour”.

“Later, Petzel sold his car to Edmond “Hoot Owl” Gibson. Gibson had become an accomplished rodeo champion in 1910 when silent film director Francis Boggs cast him as an extra in a Hollywood cowboy feature.” The photo below courtesty of The Silent Movie Blog shows Hoot in the car with his Cunningham Roadster behind it. Read the rest of Roberts comment below for more information.

 

https://theoldmotor.com/?p=140175

 

 

 In 1925, Gus Petzel made a San Francisco to Washington, D.C. run in this charming little baby car. The postcard description tells more about it: “The smallest automobile in the world – Designed and built by Gus Petzel of Alameda, California. The car has a 4-cylinder air cooled motor, 3-speeds, electric lights and starter, 60 inch wheelbase, 21″ x 4″ airplane tires, and weighs 560 pounds. It makes 52 miles per gallon and has a speed of 65 miles on the road and 80 miles on the track. Cost $2,000 to build”.

A number of stories turned up about Petzel’s run, and the February 1926 issue of Popular Science has a short article along with a photo and gives the same basic details. The book Alameda tells us that he lived at 1207 Grand Street, on the small island city next to Oakland and across the Bay from San Francisco.

This car is without a doubt is related to the Art Smith Baby Cars, built ten years earlier in San Francisco. The little racer is slightly modernized and powered by an in-line four-cylinder Henderson motorcycle engine.

 

Edited by mike6024 (see edit history)
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  • 1 month later...
55 minutes ago, AHa said:

Below is a picture of a 1911 GJG racer. The picture was digitized by Google and originates from the university of Michigan. GJGs were  built by the G. J. G. Motor car company of White Plains, N.Y.

GJG 1912 racer.jpg

This car survives to this day although I don't know of it's present condition:  https://museum.dmna.ny.gov/application/files/9715/5579/5700/GJG_Car_NYG.pdf

 

Howard Dennis

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1 hour ago, 1937hd45 said:

Howard, I'll see the GJG owner at Hershey and ask for a progress report. Seams like yesterday I was stopping by to see what Tony was doing with it on my way to Bennington this time of year. Bob 

Hey Bob, I know exactly what you mean. While we are talking about this car let me tell you about how he said he found it. Tony said he was in the White Plains area in the late 1940's and saw a 1920's Dodge touring for sale at a gas station. He said the minute he opened the hood and saw that Wisconsin engine he knew it was going home with him.

 

Howard Dennis

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All I can say is Tony told me the GJG was wearing a Dodge body when he acquired it during the late 1940's. From what has survived I assume Tony got all the parts that were removed form the GJG to mount the Dodge body at the time he purchased it.  I first saw the GJG in the 1960's at Tony's Sunoco station and when I left NY in the 1990's I believe he still owned the car.

 

Howard Dennis

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I'll answer this one last time and then I'm done. I've stated what Tony told me nearly 50 years ago. I had no reason to doubt him then and I'll not involve myself in smearing his memory now.  Tony was a close personal friend of Peter Helk's and maintained Old 16 for most of his life. Peter drew up a set of plans for a speedster body which hung on the wall of Tony's  station next to the GJG for years. 

 

This next story is speculation on my part based on what Tony told me. I believe Tony never created Peter's version because he learned the true story of what he owned. An elderly gentleman stopped into Tony's station and asked Tony if he knew the story of the patch on the oil pan. He then proceeded to tell Tony that he personally put a rod through that hole while racing at the Sheepshead Bay race track. He further went on to tell Tony that he was G. J. Grossman's son.

 

What part of Tony's owning the car from the 1940's till the 1990's is it you fail to understand? The article states the car was sold in 1995. I'm going to speculate again here but I take this to mean that that was probably when Tony let go of the car for the first time in almost half a century.

 

One final note, the picture's of Tony's GJG in the article are exactly as I remember it sitting in Tony's station, color and all.

 

 

Howard Dennis

Edited by hddennis (see edit history)
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