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Period RACE CAR Images to Relieve some of the Stress


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THANK YOU WAYNE! If you hadn't taken the time to tell the above story nobody would have known this interesting piece of history. We drove up Pikes Peak in the family wagon back in the 1990's, a trip everyone should take at some time. 

 

Bob 

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Austin Clark drove his 1929 Lincoln model L phaeton up and down Pikes Peak twice. He made a post card of it at the peak from a photo he took. 

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THANKS HOWARD! This car is restored and well, saw in in the Briggs Cunningham collection back around 1975. I hope it is in the Collins Collection now. There was a photo of it on a trailer behind a tow car with a lot of debris around it  during the hurricane of 1938 somewhere in New England. Now I have to find some of her cars that Bob Swanson drove for her. Best wishes for 2021! Bob

 

 

 BAS.L.37F.jpg

 

 

The car today in the Revs Institute in Florida, Fred Frame once owned the car. 

 

 

a8648db5dfbb272587beb15ca2da15ca.jpg

Edited by 1937hd45 (see edit history)
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Howard, I think the "Air Cooled Douglas" in the above link may have been a Ranger aircraft engine. It was common to turn them 180 degrees with the cylinders on top and power race cars with them. Bob 

 

 

 

39bigcar.jpg

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59 minutes ago, 1937hd45 said:

THANKS HOWARD! This car is restored and well, saw in in the Briggs Cunningham collection back around 1975. I hope it is in the Collins Collection now. There was a photo of it on a trailer behind a tow car with a lot of debris around it  during the hurricane of 1938 somewhere in New England. Now I have to find some of her cars that Bob Swanson drove for her. Best wishes for 2021! Bob

 

 

 BAS.L.37F.jpg

 

 

The car today in the Revs Institute in Florida, Fred Frame once owned the car. 

 

 

a8648db5dfbb272587beb15ca2da15ca.jpg


 

I love these two photos, it really shows the size of those cars. I think they appear small with no human frame of reference, almost like a small shoe until someone sits in it or stands next to it.  They are a lot larger than they appear alone. 

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^^^^^^ That restored blue #4 is a huge car, there was a magazine feature on it back in the 1970's with a cut a way drawing. Based on former INDY 500 car it was rebuilt in the mid 1930's with that body. I remember it had a Bugatti GP car rear axle.

 

Just spent some more time with Google, here is the history on the car.  Bob 

 

1930 Fred Frame Duesenberg | Revs Institute

Edited by 1937hd45 (see edit history)
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Vanderbilt Cup race of 1904. the first race ran through Floral Park on long island before it was incorporated and they had to have a village historian ( NY State law says you have to or be in violation of state law) I am the appointed historian for that village and have been for several decades. The photo of the bridge shows some of the crowd gathered to see the race that was held all on public roads!

In the photo with the rail road bridge you are looking east , the road is Jericho Turnpike ( turnpike was the name for a toll road when used by horse drawn carriages) which is a state road. The railroad bridge was removed 6 decades ago when Jericho Turnpike was widened by the state in 1960-61. The area to the right of the bridge (south) is now a parking lot and level with the road. the early touring car was part of the race committee . the road in the foreground is Tulip Avenue.

The second photograph was taken of Jericho Turnpike looking west, and was taken by someone standing on the railroad bridge in the other photo. The cross road to the left is Tulip Avenue and to the right is Queens County , one of the five boroughs of New York City. At that point the road is named Little Neck Parkway. Note the tall poles lining the north side of the road - these were for telegraph communication as telephones were still mostly in ones imagination. All roads were not paved and kept in good order by frequent use of oil to keep the dust and dirt down. the number on the race cars radiator core is 18.

VANderbiltrace1940bridge001.jpg

VANderbiltrace1940bridge002.jpg

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It is a real shame this epidemic occurred simultaneously with the AACA move. I have to believe the AACA has a treasure trove of early race car pictures that could be loaded if anyone had the time to do so.

 

Here is one of the factory Buick race cars. This is one of the underslung models and I don't believe it is a widely distributed photo. I had not seen it before in my google pictures search. As such, it is an important period photo. Ed Minnie posted it in the other period photo thread.FFF85132-EE1F-4547-83BC-FB8AB00B5C23.png

Edited by AHa (see edit history)
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Pictures taken in 1953 on Ocean Road, near the starting point of the Bridgehampton Road Race. Car is the W 194 Mercedes-Benz (00004/52) which had placed second in the Mille Miglia under the stewardship of Kling and Klenk.  Having been repainted from its green racing livery, it was brought to Bridgehampton by Max Hoffman as a demonstration item for promotional purposes.

 

 

101719792_W59-4997atBridgehampton19533.jpg.30181aefc89808d7f214602796a945ee.jpg1459387753_BrigehamptonRoadCourseMap.jpg.19f0eb2a8620d5488fb4a777d553cef0.jpg

 

 

1140422286_W59-4997atBridgehampton1.thumb.jpg.598651422f660069a54d0e7ec4c9cb38.jpg

Edited by ejboyd5 (see edit history)
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A pair of Model Ts from the 1909 Ocean to Ocean race. Notice the shock absorbers, or would that be axle limiters on the front axle.

Image result for 1909 Harrisburg Endurance Run

 

It's fun to see these period photos, in what I call "Real Life."

 

Image result for 1909 Harrisburg Endurance Run

Edited by AHa (see edit history)
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This is also said to be Frank Kulick, in what can only be assumed to be a Ford. Wayne, care to weigh in on this one?

Image result for 1909 Harrisburg Endurance Run

 

Image result for 1909 Harrisburg Endurance Run

Notice that frame is nothing but angle iron.

 

Image result for 1909 Harrisburg Endurance Run

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That is 'Baby', the two-2-cylinder model C (similar to the earlier model A) engine racing car. Rob Heyen should weigh in here. If I recall correctly, about 1904 (I sometimes get that year wrong by one?), the first Ford six cylinder racing car was wrecked. Ford had sold off the 999 and Arrow cars which were by then becoming a bit outdated anyway, although they were still being used by others.  Henry was still trying to promote his company through racing, so they quickly threw this car together to run in several events. The car performed very well, and won a couple events, garnering the desired publicity. The six cylinder car was rebuilt soon after, only to be wrecked again, and then later rebuilt again.

About that time, Henry stopped serious racing car building for the first time, instead racing in speed contests and hill climbs in basically production model chassis and cars (mostly the model K). They resumed race car building for 1909, again rebuilding the wrecked six cylinder car (which had an engine considerably larger than the model K Ford engine!). They intended to enter the first Indianapolis races, however were disqualified due to being too light in weight. That again rebuilt six cylinder racing car didn't get raced much due the 'politics' of racing in those days (again, too light!), and still exists in the Henry Ford collection almost exactly as it was in 1910.

If I recall correctly, 'Baby' is the only one of Ford's early racing cars that nothing significant of the original car exists (I could be wrong about that?). Sweepstakes was restored. One of the two nearly interchangeable 999 and Arrow cars still exists, and the six cylinder car exists intact in its final form from about 1910. 'Baby' is also the one of Henry Ford's early racing cars that the least is known about.

Edited by wayne sheldon (see edit history)
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I just looked back at a bookmarked forum thread Rob H had posted a few years back. I had said that 'Baby's engine was two model A engines, However a note in that thread said it was two model C engines. So I corrected that in the post above. 

 

I will also share the link to that 2018 Rob H thread. It is mostly about the six cylinder car, short and quite interesting.

 

http://www.mtfca.com/discus/messages/822076/825822.html?1516574860

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My father and friend leaning against the white car, maybe the early 30's. Anyone know what that track is, looks like quite the grandstand.

 

Thanks

 

Dave

 

My brother found the original photo, on the back -Johnny and Lu,  Reading PA, 1934, before the crack up.

 

 

race car at track.jpe

Edited by Dave39MD (see edit history)
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  • 1 month later...

This is Bluebird III driven by Malcolm Campbell at Daytona Beach , Florida. 1933 World record at 272.108 miles per hour

Bluebirdracecar001.jpg

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On 2/8/2021 at 10:27 PM, AHa said:

Long Island Stock Chassis Derby

IImage result for 1909 Palmer-Singer pictures

 

Identified as a 90 horse Mercedes

Please give credit where you take the photos from!!!! this was from an article I did and was published and copyrighted! Photos came from a friend whose grandfather took them at the race. GIVE CREDIT WHERE CREDIT IS DUE PLEASE.

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Walt,

Like most of the pictures I post, I found this picture on the world wide web and the information I got was the title I gave it. The picture, as posted, did not say it came from an article you wrote. I did not look for an original source. Most of the pictures I have posted were copyrighted by someone at some time but I am not profiting from posting the pictures on this forum and I had this conversation with Peter. If I need to delete all the pictures I've posted in this thread because I did not give credit to the owner of the picture, I am perfectly willing to do so if you think I should. I guess I don't fully understand copyright law.

 

Every picture on the internet was taken by somebody and the rights to that picture are therefore owned by the person who took it. In that most of the people who took pictures in the early 1900s are dead, I guess ownership would naturally flow to the heirs unless specifically willed to someone else. All of these pictures I posted were already in the public domain and viewable by any interested parties. What I did was transfer them from one website to another. If I have done wrong, just let me know and I will make it right.

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Please make it right. The photographs were published in a current magazine and that magazine is copy righted , so it includes the article as well as the photographs included in that article. I got the permission to use the photographs from the family of the man that took them . I can understand and appreciate your enthusiasm but do believe you will need to be more diligent in just assuming everything you copy can then be reused without question.

 

As of now I will refrain from posting anything here or anywhere else until I am satisfied that credit is given, not looking for 24 point type in bold face, but think it would be fair that people understand that everything on the internet is not just a take and grab no matter how good the intentions . I am done.

WEG

Edited by Walt G (see edit history)
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