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DB26

UPDATE Page 2 — Question About My ‘26 Dodge’s Carburetor

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May want to locate a 76 (Sunoco) station that has leaded racing fuel, there is one in Newport Beach I go to.....also, double check you don't have water in your tank/lines, if you do, by running it rich you overcompensate for the poor running....

 

https://www.sunocoracefuels.com/fuel-finder

 

(I'll go back to the truck forum now)

 

 

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33 minutes ago, Surf City '38 said:

May want to locate a 76 (Sunoco) station that has leaded racing fuel, there is one in Newport Beach I go to.....also, double check you don't have water in your tank/lines, if you do, by running it rich you overcompensate for the poor running....

 

https://www.sunocoracefuels.com/fuel-finder

 

(I'll go back to the truck forum now)

 

 

Capture.JPG

Good idea. I will check the tank for water and get myself some racing fuel. If I can’t find one close enough I’ll go fill up a fuel can. Newport Beach is about 35 miles from me.

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Racing fuel of 104 octane is very unnecessary with a compression ratio as low as DBs have. It takes more energy to ignite and burns much hotter and costs a lot more. Stick to basics. 

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4 minutes ago, nearchoclatetown said:

Racing fuel of 104 octane is very unnecessary with a compression ratio as low as DBs have. It takes more energy to ignite and burns much hotter and costs a lot more. Stick to basics. 

Good point. Would the negative effects of ethanol be easier to deal with than having the engine try to deal with racing fuel?  

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I use avgas. It is 100ll 100 octane at altitude. At sea level it’s basically premium. It has no ethanol and stores very well. I only fill my car up once or twice a year. The fuel will be used long before it turns. Since I have a 12v system it runs well. If you are interested I have another thread about it. It’s called avgas in a Dodge.

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Posted (edited)

When you think you have water in the gas, what do you do?  There is stuff called 'Dry Gas' (and many other brand names) which is basically (guess what) ethanol.  Ethanol and water mix so when added to the tank, it allows removal of the water by burning the mixture in the engine.  Putting 10% ethanol gasoline in achieves the same thing.   I have never had an issue running regular unleaded (10% ethanol) gas in my '25 and don't even bother adding fuel stabilizer for the winter season (it does get well below freezing in eastern. CT).  I do shut off the vacuum tank fuel feed to carb and run out the gasoline when putting the car up for winter.  To the best of my knowledge, there are no rubber components in the fuel system on these cars, so the worry about ethanol deteriorating rubber parts isn't there.  I can't imagine why anyone would put high octane leaded racing fuel in one of these low compression engines but hey,  it's your money.  If you are concerned about the quality of fuel, go to one of the major name brand stations that sells a lot of gas.

Edited by MikeC5 (see edit history)
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1 hour ago, MikeC5 said:

 I can't imagine why anyone would put high octane leaded racing fuel in one of these low compression engines but hey,  it's your money.

 

Just to know, its for the lead, not the octane, in CA its the only way to purchase fuel with lead.

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But why do you feel lead benefits your Dodge?  A little googling and I came up with this: 

Quote

Lead was first tried as an “anti-knock” additive for gasoline in 1921. Although other anti-knock additives were known, researchers at General Motors’ (GM’s) Dayton, Ohio, facilities believed that they could make more money with leaded gasoline. In 1923, Thomas Midgley calculated that it would be possible to capture 20% of the gasoline market and make 3 cents per  gallon, for about $36 million per year.16 Within a decade the profits would be ten times that amount, and by the 1950s the profits would be in the billions.

The crucial moment in making ethyl the dominant fuel came when GM and its part-owner DuPont joined forces with Standard Oil Co. (now Exxon) in August 1924 to market leaded gasoline through their partnership in the Ethyl Corporation (now New Market Corporation).

Controversy erupted in October 1924, when workers in a Standard refinery in Bayway, New Jersey, went violently insane after making leaded gasoline. Seven men died and 33 were hospitalized there; meanwhile, ten more were killed at a DuPont facility, and at least two died and 40 were hospitalized in Dayton, Ohio.17–20

Leaded gasoline was the subject of a federal inquiry, but in 1926 the Public Health Service concluded that the dilute additive in gasoline posed no immediate threat to the public. Within a few years, nearly all gasoline contained lead.

 

The engine in a '26 Dodge had changed very little over the previous decade in terms of combustion, so we can reasonably assume it was not designed with leaded gas in mind.  What benefit do you think you're getting by burning leaded gasoline?  

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5 hours ago, MikeC5 said:

But why do you feel lead benefits your Dodge?  A little googling and I came up with this: 

 

The engine in a '26 Dodge had changed very little over the previous decade in terms of combustion, so we can reasonably assume it was not designed with leaded gas in mind.  What benefit do you think you're getting by burning leaded gasoline?  

This has been my train of thought on the subject since I bought my Dodge in 2017. It’s once of the first things I deciphered when looking up info on how to care for the car. 

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Here’s what the gas sample I pulled today looks like:

 

D8EDAA6A-1E03-4153-A1DE-CA573FC0218E.thumb.jpeg.37427fccb58b48bd93195688adaf8962.jpeg
 

D10A74D0-7DCF-4F38-856D-F8083D9350D6.thumb.jpeg.e5e9110654a02231ee9993515164f2c4.jpeg

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It does look a bit nasty but I thought you had an in-line filter.  

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DB26, I THINK this the result of ethanol gas separating. When left set the ethanol separates and attracts water. To test it buy some new gas place in an open container and let set on a rainy high humidity day. It will separate in to two distinct colors, one being gas the other ethanol and water. 

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8 hours ago, MikeC5 said:

It does look a bit nasty but I thought you had an in-line filter.  

This was directly from the tank drain. 

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6 hours ago, nearchoclatetown said:

DB26, I THINK this the result of ethanol gas separating. When left set the ethanol separates and attracts water. To test it buy some new gas place in an open container and let set on a rainy high humidity day. It will separate in to two distinct colors, one being gas the other ethanol and water. 

Yes, it appears a bit separated. I’ll make sure to get fresh gas very soon. Might drain the tank and use it in lawn equipment. 

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