Recommended Posts

I had wondered about those 19/32 and 29/32 wrenches that are in some older sets I've picked up. Truthfully I figured they were some Chrysler weirdness because I never found that size fastener on GM or even tractors...😜  Good to know what they're for as it helps me date those wrenches within a few years.

 

I picked up an ancient S-K toolbox with a decal on the lid at an auction last year. Until that time never knew S-K stood for Sherman-Klove.

 

I've taken to picking up push drills at swap meets, flea markets, antique shops etc and have gotten lucky enough to find some still with all the bits. Got one brass one from Bell Telephone. Yes, cordless drills made them obsolete but I enjoy using them on quick-n-dirty jobs. 

 

Been wasting time today taking apart old ratchets and doing a clean and lube on them. Amazing how good these old Craftsman, NAPA and Blackhawk pieces work now!

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, rocketraider said:

push drills

 

 

AKA Yankee Drill. Or Yankee Screwdriver. Of course, only those made by North  Brothers Manufacturing Company and those that bought them out (Stanley) are actual Yankee drills....

 

Still have them, use now and then. 

 

You familiar with McFeely's catalog? They carry the adapters for 1/4" bits.

 

https://www.mcfeelys.com/search/?q=yankee

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Although they work the same and look similar, there is a difference between a push drill and a yankee screwdriver. They do make bits for yankee screwdrivers though. I learned this when buying tools for my hand tool wood shop.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
6 hours ago, ryan95 said:

Although they work the same and look similar, there is a difference between a push drill and a yankee screwdriver.

Can you elucidate on this difference?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I don't have a Yankee screwdriver, but here is my Miller's Falls push drill. Usually they have bit storage in the handle, are smaller than a push drill, and they don't have the spiral part of the mechanism exposed like the Yankee screwdrivers do.

KIMG0497.thumb.JPG.88f66f402578fddbb9f03fb1ec3f5004.JPG

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I just found this picture on the internet. It shows one of each.69p0101_yankeecombo_main_1.jpg.9b5e983856040ad5d215fd203b821c49.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)
On 4/24/2020 at 7:58 PM, rocketraider said:

I had wondered about those 19/32 and 29/32 wrenches that are in some older sets I've picked up. Truthfully I figured they were some Chrysler weirdness because I never found that size fastener on GM or even tractors...😜  Good to know what they're for as it helps me date those wrenches within a few years.

 

Actually the old wrenches that are xx/32 are probably for and used on cars built prior to the Society of Automotive Engineers standardizing bolt sizes and thread counts in about 1912 from what I have been told.  I am sure there were some carry over vehicles.   My 1908 has a number of those different size bolts.  I carry a crescent wrench with me on tours.

Edited by Larry Schramm (see edit history)
  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

So, you say a Yankee drill does not exist? 

 

Because this picture looks just like mine:

 

 

Yankee Drill.jpg

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)

I have only drills with this, no screw bits. Are they missing or what? We've had this for about 60 years. Craftsman.

 

 

Craftsman.JPG

Edited by mike6024 (see edit history)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, Frank DuVal said:

So, you say a Yankee drill does not exist? 

 

Because this picture looks just like mine:

Just like mine although my Grandmother always referred to it as the "pushy, pulley go like helley drill"

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
9 hours ago, Frank DuVal said:

So, you say a Yankee drill does not exist? 

Yankee made push drills too. Probably the most important difference, which I forgot to mention, is that the shanks of the bits are different. The shank of a push drill bit is about half the size. There are adapters though. Look at the picture I found on Google. Early push drills used another type of bit altogether. I think they used a three or four jaw chuck.

 

s-l300.jpg

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
19 hours ago, Frank DuVal said:

Because this picture looks just like mine:

 

 

Yankee Drill.jpg

 

My brother sent me a package earlier this year with some tools that were once my dad's.  One of the items was this exact same Yankee #41 push drill.  When I first saw it I didn't know what it was.  Now that I saw this thread I'm going to have to find a place in the tool box for it. My dad also had the other longer version one as well. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hello rah and everyone,sorry I haven’t been back to this post recently,yes that is one of the steering wheel pullers,they made several different kind,but it’s hard t find the ones that grab the wheel from underneath,I hate tapping on the end of the shaft because I know what I will do,I’m not as heavy handed since I got older but I still can break things if I’m not careful,   Dave

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)

Our Yankee drill was pressed into service many times to drill a small hole in plaster to hang pictures. 😉  Other times it was for woodworking. Never saw it used on metal. For that we used the breast drill.😁

 

Yes, I have seen the different "chuck" sizes on the tools I have, now it makes sense. The exposed spiral is a screwdriver with the larger chuck and the drill is the smooth shank with the smaller chuck is the drill.👍

Edited by Frank DuVal (see edit history)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I thought you might get a charge out of this. My grandfathers, still in use

0232E723-1D8C-4956-93E5-85D22085D095.jpeg

371C1113-D55C-4A0A-B0F2-4FCB1861BACA.jpeg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

And just to ratchet things up...

67A7785C-3EF9-4F83-9EBF-DE4BFDBFAEF8.jpeg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My dad used to find tools in the wild.

9EC0EEB9-6D8A-4903-8E65-778358016964.jpeg

  • Like 3
  • Haha 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Here is a tool i picked up a few years ago for tune ups on the 1929 Chevrolet, man what a time saver !!

oh course it was missing the socket, so found one close in concept, had a friend cut it down to proper length and works like a charm !!

 

20180602_073336.thumb.jpg.85e6529299872c25d80d967a03d05136.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, Tinindian said:

A toolbox from Facebook.

Chev toolbox.jpg

That has to be the coolest tool box ever. 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
4 hours ago, Tinindian said:

A toolbox from Facebook.

Chev toolbox.jpg


I would never anything done, aside from scrubbing my hands every time I needed something. 

  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 4/24/2020 at 7:58 PM, rocketraider said:

 

 

Been wasting time today taking apart old ratchets and doing a clean and lube on them. Amazing how good these old Craftsman, NAPA and Blackhawk pieces work now!

 What a coincidence, I took apart my sticky ratchet

 and lubed it yesterday.

 I was going to throw it out but it turned out to only had some sand in it.😊

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I dig that WIZARD ratchet! Been accumulating various WIZARD hand tools the last few years as it seems they weren't as common here as others, though 3 towns within 20 miles all had Western Auto stores.

 

My uncle had beaucoups of Montgomery Ward Powr-Kraft hand tools from when they lived in Baltimore. I don't know what happened to them but I'd love to have them for the connection to him as well as to a brand no longer existing.

 

Friend has found a list of Craftsman tools that you can find out what company made the tools for Sears and when.

 

I didn't have any sand in my ratchets, just a lot of dried or non-existent grease. WD40, Q-Tips and a film of SynCo Super Lube synthetic grease I got at Harbor Freight made them work smoothly again. I swear some of those ratchets weren't this smooth new...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

As me Grandma would have said, I am "partial" to that Allstate dwell-tach too. That's one of the oldest ones I've seen. Totally cool!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now