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Old tools


zeke01

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15 minutes ago, Doozer said:

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I'll take that Champion spark plug display!!!!

These photos are awesome-thanks for sharing. 

Terry

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Every shop needs a Vise. Here's a vise and a half, or maybe even times two at least. Picked this up last year in a deal for a collection of tractors and stuff. Actually had to move it with a tractor with a loader. Need to get it mounted on a table. Sold off most of the tractors. The Vise is a keeper. Yeah, That's a Model A Ford motor in the back ground. Dandy Dave!  

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2 hours ago, Doozer said:

Glad you’re enjoying them. I’ve been encouraged by the reactions that these period photos I own have been getting. Lots of likes so I’ll keep posting. Thanks, Doozer

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Not sure I'd want "V-D" spark plugs!

And look at that guy? Or woman in the

V-D outfit😬

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9 hours ago, Dandy Dave said:

Yeah. Vice err ...ahhh ...Vise collectors anonymous... LOL.. 

 

Spelling matters. My wife wouldn't let me go look at an old Jeep because the ad said that it came with wench !

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10 hours ago, Dandy Dave said:

Every shop needs a Vise. Here's a vise and a half, or maybe even times two at least. Picked this up last year in a deal for a collection of tractors and stuff. Actually had to move it with a tractor with a loader. Need to get it mounted on a table. Sold off most of the tractors. The Vise is a keeper. Yeah, That's a Model A Ford motor in the back ground. Dandy Dave!  

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It would be a guess on my part but as big as it is, might have been in a locomotive roundhouse / repair shop?

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With this vice (or any for that matter) it is important to have a well anchored bench.

The bigger the vice the harder we push/pull on them.

I pulled one of my benches off of the wall to teach me that lesson.

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19 hours ago, Dandy Dave said:

Every shop needs a Vise. Here's a vise and a half, or maybe even times two at least. Picked this up last year in a deal for a collection of tractors and stuff. Actually had to move it with a tractor with a loader. Need to get it mounted on a table. Sold off most of the tractors. The Vise is a keeper. Yeah, That's a Model A Ford motor in the back ground. Dandy Dave!  

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Very nice vise, Dandy Dave. Just the thing for bending heavy steel with a 10 lb sledge hammer. Do I see hinged pieces below the jaws? Are these folding supports for the job, or something more specialised? I've not noticed them before.

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1 hour ago, Bush Mechanic said:

 

 

Very nice vise, Dandy Dave. Just the thing for bending heavy steel with a 10 lb sledge hammer. Do I see hinged pieces below the jaws? Are these folding supports for the job, or something more specialised? I've not noticed them before.

Just rivets that hold the jaws for round objects like pipe or round stock. starters, generators.  

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10 hours ago, dei said:

 

It would be a guess on my part but as big as it is, might have been in a locomotive roundhouse / repair shop?

The fellow that had this worked for the local Cement plant for years. I would guess it most likely came from there when they were taking down machinery buildings and replacing them with newer stuff. Dandy Dave!  

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On 5/2/2020 at 4:16 PM, Doozer said:

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Having too much free time, I searched "105 E. 24th Street, Charlotte" and found "Machine Shop of Charlotte" located there.  Perhaps a successor to Jones Cylinder Grinding?

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I have been collecting vintage tools for years and years. I love this thread! 

 

I saw a big Reed vise earlier. Here is my big Ridgid vise. 8.5" jaws (21.6 cm), with my grandkids. Photo taken on the night I brought it home. It's old, but appears unused...just dirty. 

Ridge Vise 2012 Jims giant AVA Lo Rez 2.jpg

Edited by lump (see edit history)
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And speaking of old bench vises, I have a really old one which I believe is quite uncommon. How many have you seen which are dual-shaft chain-drive vises, like this one? For me, it's the only one I have ever seen in person. Kinda neat, don't you think? 

Vise twin screen chain drive 4 LO Rez.jpg

Vise twin screen chain drive 2 Lo rez.jpg

Vise twin screen chain drive 5 Lo Rez.jpg

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I found out that there is a big Following of these old Reed Vises. And there is a month and year stamped in many.  This one was stamped 347. Which is march of 1947. I put it on a piece of I beam this week and have been putting it to good use. Going to build some swinging and adjustable outriggers to stabilize it side to side so it will be movable and take up less space when not in use. Weighs 185 LBS. Dandy Dave!  

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Edited by Dandy Dave (see edit history)
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2 minutes ago, Dandy Dave said:

I found out that there is a big Following of these old Reed Vises. And there is a month and year stamped in many.  This one was stamped 347. Which is march of 1947. I put it on a piece of I beam this week and have been putting it to good use. Going to build some swinging and adjustable outriggers to stabilize it side to side so it will be movable and take up less space when not in use. Weighs 185 LBS. Dandy Dave!  

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Nothing like a good large vise and a big anvil in the shop.

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I was told this was a line boring tool when I got it but I don't see how it could be. Does anybody recognize anything?

Image previewImage preview

 

I don't understand how I can post a picture that I can see on my computer but nobody else can see.

Edited by AHa (see edit history)
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2 hours ago, 28 Chrysler said:

These were designed for mobile aircraft field repair during WWII.

They make the raised bead in tubing and the Bakelite case weighs almost as much as the tool set.

This set is from the late 1940s or early 50s

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Nice! What sizes of tubing can you make raised beads on?

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