Recommended Posts

5 hours ago, Joe in Canada said:

That one is very different as the one we used had long handles like bolt cutters.  I would not want to have my head anywhere near the bulls legs.

I suspect those ones were used one time then went into an estate sale.  

W.C. Fields once said, "There comes a time when you must grab the bull by the tail and face the situation".

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Bill Boudway said:

Hi,

My guess is a spark plug wrench. Any other guesses?

IMG_1720[1].JPG

 

This could work as a draw-bar spanner on a milling machine. Small hammer head on the handle, and a hanging hook. I doubt it's deep enough for a plug spanner. Most likely automotive, though.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
8 hours ago, Isaiah said:

The magnet charger will  work on  a lot of tractor and the old hit and miss engines. magneto

That one is a nice one..

Yup. I've charged my share of them. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
6 hours ago, mike6024 said:

The Vice Grips with the "Easy Release" are a newer model, not an "antique."

 

Real Vice Grips don't have that.

 

Real Vice grips. LOL. I have a patent on a clamping device that they had some interest in. I was given a privet tour of the factory in Dewitt, Nebraska. this was around 1990. There is was a wall case in the hall across from the company President's office. He was  a grandson of the original owner and inventor. The first pair was in that wall cabinet and it had a bolt in the handle to tighten it. Yes, some pairs from the 1920's and 1930's did not have the release lever. It was added later. Real Vise Grips were made by the Petersen family. Last I knew, Erwin Tools owns the company now. The pair I have is from the 50's or 60's. Dandy Dave. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
10 hours ago, mike6024 said:

P4100012.JPG

P4100014.JPG

P4100013.JPG

Yes. That is like a second or third generation pair. There was around 25 or 30 pairs in that case and all were a little different with changes though the years. Dandy Dave!  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Just Dave, Is this what you are looking for?  I had one some years ago but just went out to garage and cannot find it. It has been loaned to many of the local car members over the years and somehow It has not returned. I found it at a local swap meet not long after seeing this pic in the '34 Truck repair manual. I saw that weird thing and asked the seller what the heck is that thing? He said 'don't know. I asked how much? I believe he said $15.00 and I said sold. This is one of those tools one acquires over time and use once or twice then loose it . Good Luck finding one.

'30s Steering Wheel Puller II.JPG

'30s stering wheel puller.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I dont think it's the age of your tool that matters,it's how well you take care of it.My old tool dosent get much use anymore.

  • Haha 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)
3 hours ago, RAH said:

Just Dave, Is this what you are looking for?  I had one some years ago but just went out to garage and cannot find it. It has been loaned to many of the local car members over the years and somehow It has not returned. I found it at a local swap meet not long after seeing this pic in the '34 Truck repair manual. I saw that weird thing and asked the seller what the heck is that thing? He said 'don't know. I asked how much? I believe he said $15.00 and I said sold. This is one of those tools one acquires over time and use once or twice then loose it . Good Luck finding one.

'30s Steering Wheel Puller II.JPG

'30s stering wheel puller.jpg

That a Miller 232 steering wheel puller that also came with a thick protective leather backup collar.

I use mine occasionally.

 I have a friend of has one too. Took four  years to find one for him though.

It is a rare tool for sure.

I have a lot of 30s' 40's Miller MoPar service tools...use them doing mechanic work.

Steering wheel Puller Miller 232 (2).JPG

Steering Wheel Miller 232 Puller.JPG

Wall of Miller tools.jpg

Edited by c49er (see edit history)
  • Like 4

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Here is a socket  set I picked up well over 35 years ago and it was old then. The logo inside has a small bit of gift wrap stuck to it

002 (2).JPG

006.JPG

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 4/7/2020 at 11:31 PM, Terry Bond said:

Here are a couple of tool assortments out in my "museum."  First one is a cabinet full of early tools, many for Model T Fords.  I bought this cabinet complete as you see it.  Good story, catch me at Hershey for the details.  Next, is an old tool chest full of stuff.  It was owned by a mechanic who worked at a Norfolk Studebaker dealership beginning in 1916.  I have several souvenirs form that old dealership, but this tool chest is filled with neat stuff that I've found very handy over the years.  Last item is one of several little old socket sets I've got but this one has a great label inside the lid.

I have a good friend in NJ who has collected odd wrenches for years and It's simply amazing what hangs on the walls in his basement.

Terry

Tool cabinet.jpg

Tool chest.jpg

Tools wrench set Ford.jpg

 

This could have come from the 1919 Western Auto Ford catalog. Neat. $4.40 seems pretty pricey for 1919. Must be a good quality set.

 

Screenshot_20200413-120626_Gallery.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, 28 Chrysler said:

Here is a socket  set I picked up well over 35 years ago and it was old then. The logo inside has a small bit of gift wrap stuck to it

002 (2).JPG

006.JPG

 

I have that set in a 1/4 drive that I use every day.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)
On 4/9/2020 at 4:12 PM, Bill Boudway said:

Hi,

Yes, I know it's a bit brace.

Extra credit  if you can  tell what trade might find it useful

IMG_1718[1].JPG

A Corner Brace.

 

I also own one of these.  Electricians! Hard to operate a brace and bit inside a stud bay!

 

Plumbers just use an ax.... Ha! 😄    Never seen a bit for a brace thatr would cut 4" holes.... 

Edited by Frank DuVal (see edit history)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

This socket set was owned by an old mechanic who once worked for a Ford garage in Alaska. Made by the Bethlehem Spark Plug Company. I've posted this before,but can't remember which forum.

Vintage socket set 001.JPG

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

This is probably not terribly old but I find it a little different. It's a socket set with allen wrench handles instead of a ratchet. Maybe someone can shed some light on it. It was given to me by a club member who can no longer work on cars. 

20200413_143219.jpg

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

^I have an Allen wrench set like that without the rack.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Some of my favorites and used on occasion when more modern just doesn't work.

Old Tools 1.JPG

Old Tools 2.JPG

Old Tools 3.JPG

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 4/6/2020 at 9:57 PM, James Wright said:

Don't ask me to identify this, other than it's an old jack, or ask where it came from. My favorite daughter found it somewhere and knew I'd like it. If anyone can shed any light on it, go for it. 

 

20200406_215235.jpg

 

IMO, this is an old wagon jack.  Pre horseless carriage.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 4/13/2020 at 11:29 AM, 28 Chrysler said:

Here is a socket  set I picked up well over 35 years ago and it was old then. The logo inside has a small bit of gift wrap stuck to it

002 (2).JPG

006.JPG

 

I have some sets of those. 1/4", 3/8", and 1/2" that I bought new in the 60's.

 

 

image000000 (2).jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)
On 4/6/2020 at 8:04 PM, zeke01 said:

And this

AA4A5820-1A4C-4311-AE8F-7EDD6909C8D7.jpeg

 

I have an assortment of rethreaders that look like this.  They are very handy.  This is a picture of fixing a stud on my '08 Buick F.  Most of them I bought at flea markets for less than $10 as most persons did not know what they were. 

 

image000000 (3).jpg

 

The carpet is in my garage.  I have wall to wall carpet.  It is great in the winter.

Edited by Larry Schramm (see edit history)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now