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Have a vice like that, belonged to my paternal grandfather, who did some blacksmithing

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James you have a winter storage axle jack, You need three more, then you can "jack" up your car and store off the ground till spring, Karl

20200406_215235.jpg

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Thanks Karl. Here in South Florida where the temperature often plummets into the 50s in winter I think I'll just leave it in the den as a conversation piece. Any guess as to the age? I'm thinking 20s or 30s.

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5 hours ago, mike6024 said:

Interesting.

 

Antique-Cast-Iron-Wagon-Jack.jpg

 

Antique cast Iron wagon jack, Elite Mfg. Co., Ashland, Oh. C 1910-20s. Base is 4" x 7", 18 1/2" tall, 

 

( I know it's not the same, but it is similar, so Wagon Jack seems correct )

You guys are good. Seems it could be either a "wagon jack" or an  "axle jack". Upon closer inspection it says "Ashland Mfg. Co." on one side and "Ashland O." on the other.  It also says "2TS". I assume that means 2 tons. Karl you're also right about the missing piece. Something like a pin needs to go in the hole to hold it between strokes. It only lifts one click at a time. It will keep its prominent place next to the fireplace which also never gets used. 

 

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Hey Mike, I think our jacks are near identical. That means between the two of us we have a pair. If you ever come to South Florida bring yours and we'll jack something up. 😊

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Posted (edited)
11 hours ago, gossp said:


I don’t understand that tool... what I mean is... I don’t understand why I don’t own that tool. 


I sold one of those a couple years ago once I found the factory one for my car, sadly I think the BluePoint tool worked better.

 

Here’s a picture of some of my Ford “Z” tools, the hub puller is in the top center. I also have several of the Stevens tools for the T Fords and a hand cranked coil tester on my bench that I rarely use but would have a very hard time parting with.

A9503CBD-E1FB-48B8-9722-0BE0E8C7EC1C.jpeg

Edited by Mark Wetherbee (see edit history)

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Posted (edited)
10 hours ago, James Wright said:

Don't ask me to identify this, other than it's an old jack, or ask where it came from. My favorite daughter found it somewhere and knew I'd like it. If anyone can shed any light on it, go for it. 

 

20200406_215235.jpg


It’s called a tire saver. You fit it under the hubcap to hold your tires off the ground when the car is put up for the winter.  A very early tool from the time when the snow was rolled and you used a horse and sleigh in the winter months. You need to find three more, it takes 4 to make a set.

 

OOPS, I am a bit late with this... should have read the whole thread before commenting!

Edited by Mark Wetherbee (see edit history)

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6 hours ago, mike6024 said:

Interesting.

 

Antique-Cast-Iron-Wagon-Jack.jpg

 

Antique cast Iron wagon jack, Elite Mfg. Co., Ashland, Oh. C 1910-20s. Base is 4" x 7", 18 1/2" tall, 

 

( I know it's not the same, but it is similar, so Wagon Jack seems correct )

 

 

Thanks Mark.  You just confirmed what other have said. At least I can have a more intelligent conversation when people ask. Couldn't you just jack the car up the jack and put jack stands under it?

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This little hand vise sits in the top shelf of my to go toolbox. It is great for holding small parts, but its primary use by me is for clamping fuel lines. I am small engine mechanic. 

3ZktJ6IJk6ipv2Qm0lZ-fT4zx8vZUon6BCNU_Et3jEE2guzLnAm-rACC6f4fPQ_iygdTx-F7wi76yktPiVd5SC0jZay1QaAF4XMPOILlLVUzQXiswFL8eBjAJizBqBDceBJBVKgsvj8_hPZg5BsFyKEQub0PEi8421LUCwMhMCQrrxLvjOPtHPvwzpKVciPBjV9m3bX4wjzXRmKXfXqj3ucjRHZdQ5hhHcOsKEgqIO_CuMGitn30etEvQ_dO6R8z114k_QmoA9j3lkqjfxE8QiiqcY1aQOFusD-5un6hHwPp4inN4Pb50zfouGKWhRbb_NEirIL4xVu-C8xPPEcepRP24XqV7k04cRIA5SL30kWuuqI4OhTubyazl9Sx-plw8Dp_K1ATsik12r-xh5p1IQDuJpMB210NBx4EiiIjN9iFMfhEtesZH4mBEMkB8T67W-V1wEKA8oQ99GQ0qN9VhGXeH0cS-QCkm4a3ARhj7JDuWTdePcZl-J-cf9uAu41QtRDFMu2HsR48hopUd01FdFccK89haJYXJLbB4yMzU6VxZV0T8vabzjtcT5dOrUE6R9sS1G0fHo2mX_4l8Mk3Jdg0Ma3gTVTfrQ0GbkdZtISAp6CtaQpG73iaMELgo83p62UyrHglYlcyVth2ymeVEDK9H9fv6toR_fkThJGeDYi4Thg15NdY1ZdzE4R2=w370-h657-no

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Its been a while since I used one of these for its intended purpose.

These days I use them as backdrops for photos.

 

I love it when people ask what the holes are for. 

Be off, you Heathens!

 

 

001.jpg

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8 minutes ago, ryan95 said:

I'll be the one to ask. What are the holes for?


you drop the valve stems through them to keep them in order. 

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Yard sale find from a few years ago  for turning valves  when I don't know .

DSCN1656.JPG

DSCN1657.JPG

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Posted (edited)

This old Chevrolet valve lash adjuster was given to me by our local Snap-On tool dealer , who found it in an old mechanic's stash of tools. It sure is handy for it's intended purpose. Made by the Owattonna Tool Co. of Owattonna,Minn.

IMG_1636.JPG

Edited by J.H.Boland (see edit history)
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Deluxe version, the arms are adjustable .

B726AE00-DAD2-4211-8895-25F9379C0F0D.jpeg

ED5CCDA2-046A-49C5-9AD1-FA6D74ACFE55.jpeg

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JustDave

 

Snap on tools master steering wheel puller set # CG-20, maybe what you are  looking for, attached is a picture of it, this set in the picture is not complete, just to show if this is what you are looking for. I do see them from time to time on e-bay. If you need more information let me know.

 

Bob

IMG_3102.JPG

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4 hours ago, gossp said:


you drop the valve stems through them to keep them in order. 

 

The back sides are for organizing your valves

 

 

002.jpg

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Here are a couple of tool assortments out in my "museum."  First one is a cabinet full of early tools, many for Model T Fords.  I bought this cabinet complete as you see it.  Good story, catch me at Hershey for the details.  Next, is an old tool chest full of stuff.  It was owned by a mechanic who worked at a Norfolk Studebaker dealership beginning in 1916.  I have several souvenirs form that old dealership, but this tool chest is filled with neat stuff that I've found very handy over the years.  Last item is one of several little old socket sets I've got but this one has a great label inside the lid.

I have a good friend in NJ who has collected odd wrenches for years and It's simply amazing what hangs on the walls in his basement.

Terry

Tool cabinet.jpg

Tool chest.jpg

Tools wrench set Ford.jpg

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Yes that’s the type of steering wheel puller,thanks for the info and model number, now I know what to look for,     Dave

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Here is a timing light that power source is 110 volts from your house power outlet.

IMG_2849.JPG

IMG_2847.JPG

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Ever use one of these?

410EBC53-74EC-4784-801A-6B99B5D62F51.jpeg

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1 minute ago, zeke01 said:

Ever use one of these?

410EBC53-74EC-4784-801A-6B99B5D62F51.jpeg


not successfully. 

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The first jack is most likely a wagon or a buggy jack .

I got oner similar Ill try to get a picture of it. In have a Yellow cab floor jack that uses a chain. I m trying to get it all freed up

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