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Terry Bond

The scrap-pile out back!

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I just love pictures like these.  There are a number of them around showing old junkyards from the 20s, and from the wartime scrap drives.  Never seen this one though, recently posted on the Model T Ford discussion forum.

Terry

Scrap yard Jpeg.jpg

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Benefits of AACA Membership.

That was going to be quite the fire to remove the wood and upholstery. Bob 

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I remember seeing a TV show many years ago about the operation of junkyards and the disposal of cars after all the useable parts had been removed and they described how the bodies were burned to dispose of unwanted parts.  Anyone doing that now would probably be immediately executed.  

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Posted (edited)

A friend of mine, an active car enthusiast, wrote in

our AACA newsletter while I was editor about his experience:

In 1939, while in college, he bought a used 1918 Cadillac

from Bailey Brothers' Auto Parts, a junkyard in West

Lebanon, New Hampshire.  His family had had a

1918 Cadillac from new, and spoke well of that model.

 

Also in the junkyard at that time were a 1914 dual-windscreen

Rolls-Royce, a gas-lighted Pierce mountain wagon, and a 

1920 Stutz Bearcat.  Such were among the choices in that

junkyard in 1939.

 

People must have discarded it because it was outdated,

not because it was in bad condition or beyond repair.

The Cadillac he bought had one bad cylinder but ran

readily with only a new battery, some fluids, and air in

the tires.  It ran well on seven cylinders.

It turned out that both valves on the left-front cylinder

of the engine were inoperable.  The Cadillac dealer

corrected the problem with used parts for $38.

 

My friend just turned 100 and still goes to work for part

of each day, maintaining an office and a secretary.

He drove that Cadillac for more than 20,000 miles before

World War II.  More than 80 years later, he still owns and

drives that car.

 

Visit with 1918 Cadillac.JPG

Edited by John_S_in_Penna (see edit history)
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I remember going to a "junk yard" back about 1958, as dad was buying a wheel for snow tire mounting on his 1958 Chevy. It was Goochland county VA, and they were burning a 52ish Chevy right in the front of the yard next to Rt 250. Left quite an impression on my young mind.

 

Many stories in Richmond about people buying running cars from Frank Nott's junk yard, even bringing them down off the pile.😧

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I remember going with my father down to a junkyard off Rt.1 Jefferson Davis Hwy to pull a Willys flathead engine. They were burning cars and I was sitting in the car all day smelling noxious fumes.  Then there was George Philbates' yard down in Lanexa, VA.

 

We lived around Drewry's Bluff and an early 50's Ford burned up on the street next to our house. At about 3 years old, I was both fascinated and terrified at the sight of that car burning next to our house. My mother had to tell me to stop going to the window to  "look at that thing". 

"40 Clubcoupe"

GOCI 2867

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Client of ours family was in the scrap metal foundry business. In 1937 his Dad bought 1000 cars to melt down for $1.78 each. 

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The Pierce Arrow mountain wagon got out of the scrap yard before the war......Fred Roe of Duesenberg fame purchased the Pierce and then sold it off. It still is on the road and we see it once in a while at shows and events. 

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Many decades ago ( back in the early 1970s) at an AACA annual meeting then held at the Bellvue-Stratford Hotel , there were at least two black and white films shown that were made about 1928-33 era and it showed a junk yard, a car being driven into the yard drained of the gasoline in the tank , then a fire started on a rag which was thrown into the interior of the car to burn it up-( the wood framework), so that the rest of the car -sheet metal could be used for scrap. I will never for get that nor the massive groan from the crowd looking at the film. ( it was a 16mm film shown on an old projector - this was in an era before computer use). Somehow I recall that the junk/scrap yard was in NJ or in the Philadelphia area.

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My first car was a 57 DeSoto In 1963 and the local junk yard had 3 of them. I made a deal with the owner to take parts off cars for walk ins that needed something on Saturdays. My pay was I got any part I needed from the Desoto’s for free and I got to siphon gas from any junk he brought in. I always had a full tank every weekend and the DeSoto ran all thru college. A teenagers dream. 

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12 hours ago, 40Clubcoupe said:

George Philbates' yard down in Lanexa, VA.

 

Now that was a "Used Parts Emporium"!👍

 

There was another of George's yards closer to the I-64 exit that he crushed (ran over with equipment) out in 1973. That was when I first met George. I was looking at a flat Kaiser.

 

He claimed he had 6000 cars in the lot, and he KNEW where everyone of them was.

 

I needed a front clip for a '77 El Camino in the mid 90s. Yep, George sent me the front clip off a Chevelle Station Wagon. $600, no other yard could come up with anything for this insurance job.

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My biggest thrill as a 10 year old was going to the big scrap yards in London Ontario from Woodstock with my Grandpa. He only did that if it was totally necessary and no other parts were available or he couldn't make it in the machine shop.

 As I got older it was the highlight of the summer months. So many cool cars either smashed or "worn out".   I was entranced by a row of Corvettes (all hit in the front) and a 67 Shelby GT 500 that I wanted the Cobra emblems off if it. The piles of 50's cars didn't catch my eye until it was too late and they were all crushed out.

 Probably the most memorable was a 1969 Dodge Charger Daytona wing car hit in the left front. It was Turbine Bronze, white stripe and fixable. Maybe 4 years old. Now I think of all those 30's 40's 50's convertibles that I didn't even give thought to at the time. 

 

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     Bailey Brothers in West Lebanon was a great resource. Gone now for about 15 years.

 

     Not too long before they went out I needed a vacuum advance for a Chevy V-8 from around 1960. No dealership or parts store had one until I called Baileys. I gave him the part number and in a minute he replied;  " I have seven, how many do you want? "  Missed but not forgotten.

 

              Jim43

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A friend of mine, Leo Quinn, and his brother ran a Plymouth-DeSoto dealership on Main St. in our village. They opened in 1928 when the Plymouth was introduced and ran the service business up to the 1970's.

We had two dumps in the village. One was on the south end of town at the bottom of a small ravine. Leo said there was always a fire there and people would push anything unwanted over the edge and let it burn.

 

In the late '20's and early '30's the auto producers saw the used car market as competition against the sale of new cars. "The factory man" would come around each month and inspect the dealer's stock. Used cars  got the dealer a credit and the factory rep would use a sledge hammer to smash the radiator and crack the block. Leo said quite a few of those trades just went up to the other end of town and were pushed into the ravine.

 

Walter P. Sloan (read his book) was supportive of the dealer network and worked hard to develop the used car business as a profit center for them. He and Harlow Curtice did a lot together. That preserved a lot of cars. And kept them out of the dumps.

 

Here is some more recent piling waiting to pass from New York, into and across Canada to be reclaimed in Japan, because they had a better mentod of skimming off the non-metallic waste.

006001001.thumb.jpg.e1e504126b4d17d25f96739257506dce.jpg

008001001.thumb.jpg.aaba90ec017c2be70683534a8f987ae1.jpg

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Back in the mid 1970s there was a red 1956 Chevrolet El Morocco convertible wasting away in a junkyard near me. I doubt it survived as it was in pretty rough shape even back then. I was reminded of it when I saw one currently for sale in Hemmings for $285K. 

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Posted (edited)

In 1966 I took a trip down to War, West Virginia. Then we went on to Richlands, Tazwell, and Bluefield. I think the El Morraco  was in a junkyard in Richlands. The junkyard was on a side street right in town.

 

Here we are in the holler we stayed in. Art's aunt's place.

"Me and Art and a girl named Linda, travelin' and a livin' off the land."

That's not Buddy Holly's brother, it's me.

 

001.thumb.JPG.09011b3c2ad6e76acd58664334b87b22.JPG

Edited by 60FlatTop (see edit history)
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On 4/1/2020 at 4:37 PM, Terry Bond said:

I just love pictures like these.  There are a number of them around showing old junkyards from the 20s, and from the wartime scrap drives.  Never seen this one though, recently posted on the Model T Ford discussion forum.

Terry

Scrap yard Jpeg.jpg

 

I've never seen anything like this in person.  Thanks for posting the photo, Terry!

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Gotta chime in here! 
 

In 1999 went over to the US and Canada with a friend and my brother in law. My quest was parts for my ‘64 Skylark Sports Coupe that I had back in Australia. Apart from new engine parts from Egge, I badly need a remote control mirror to match the one on the drivers door.

For those old enough to remember, this was before the Internet and eBay!

 

I had put a (choke) Ford fixed one on the RH side. 😖😖😖😖😖 to pass the requirements for LHD vehicles. It was round, it worked but it had the four letter word on it! 

Mid afternoon, we came across a wrecking yard in Missoula in Montana that still had a yard full of ‘60’s and ‘70’s cars. Rows of Buick’s, Pontiacs, Cadillacs etc. as well as other makes.

 

After scouring the Buick line and coming up empty handed, almost by chance spotted among the Cadillac row, a plain white ‘64 Special sedan, reasonably complete, with ........ a remote drivers mirror. (the Buick mirror from that year can be configured for left or right door).

 

Because it was in the Caddy row, most Buick hunters would have missed it. Spent the next few hours till closing time, taking off what small bits that I could bring back (and fit in the boot in our ‘80s Chevy Impala sedan). 
 

Was so over the moon with my find, that decided to go back next day and pull the mirrors and bits off every thing I could find, figuring other guys in Australia would have same problem. Spent a whole day in 85+ heat pulling bits, was almost better than ....... 😀😀😀

 

Young guy at the yard was an avid coin collector and with some exchange of Aussie coins and notes, came away with a stash of jewellery items that seemed to have cost me peanuts. This was to on sell at swap meets when I got back.

 

When I asked why they still had so many older cars, told me in his Montana accent

‘ coz they only pay us five bucks each to crush em!”

 

Those two days gave me such a wonderful experience, to be surrounded by all those older cars that are now so collectable! And to find the mirror that I wanted like I did was a fairytale ending!

 

Hope you enjoyed my story!

Rodney 😀😀😀😀😀😀😀😀

 

 

 

 

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