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Ever hear of Shake and Break for removing frozen screws


Mark Gregory
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I was sent this from another car Forum.

Interesting how simple it works.

 

Wivco Design. Shake-N-Break is an air impact screw and fastener removal tool that uses standard, changeable, 5/16" hex insert bits that fit any or all fasteners and screwsused today. It is used in conjunction with a standard air hammer, with safety spring, at low air pressures.

 

https://youtu.be/X3FKoUrZOPY

 

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Edited by Mark Gregory (see edit history)
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These have been around forever. Pretty cumbersome to have to drag out an air hammer, hose, and this tool. I find that my Dewalt impact driver does a much better job on the same screws. Not only do I have the screwdriver and Torx tips for it, I also have nut driver tips for small hex screws. Much easier and faster, and yes, you can adjust the force on the Dewalt driver.

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I completely agree with Joe. 
 

Myself I use a Milwaukee impact, and believe the trigger control is better than the Dewalt when it comes to adjusting power output.... but I see a whole lot of old and abused Dewalt tools on job sites that seem to be no worse for a lot of ware. I see a lot of shiny and new red tools. 

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I bought and used such a tool when I was trying to remove rusted head studs from the Lincoln's engine. It sort-of worked, but I did get a lot of feedback from people in the aeronautics industry who swore by that device. My situation was probably more due to failing studs rather than stuck threads, so I didn't have much success with it. But people for whom it really matters (guys who fix airplanes) say it's a miracle worker, so I'm inclined to believe them despite my own experience (which was colored by frustration, anger, ineptitude, and previous mechanics).

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For most screws I use a standard impact screwdriver, the type that you smack with a hammer. I almost bought one of those for working on a Jeep Wrangler once though. All of the hinges and brackets on the body are held on by Allen head screws that are Loctited in place. The only way to get them out is by either heating the bolt head with a torch or by using one of those. If I ever have to do hinges on another Wrangler I will be buying one of those.

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This tool has the right idea, but doesn't look like it would have the finesse needed if you really needed the bolt not to break. It would be far better than just pulling with a wrench though.

 

Rust is brittle, shock waves break it. Soak in penetrating oil for a few days, reapplying at least once a day. Kroil is good, but Mopar Rust Penetrant (heat riser solvent) is better. Heat cycling is good if you can do it (for instance exhaust bolts on a car that still runs), Hammering on the head of the bolt while putting a little pull with a wrench will help fracture rust. Don't pull too hard, and don't use a huge hammer either. Quick, sharp high pitched raps are what you want. You could also try pulling in the tightening direction, but not too hard. If it starts to move a little, spray more penetrating oil on and quit for a while. It is easy to fool yourself when the head of the bolt or the shank finally comes loose, but the threads have not. If you keep twisting you will break it.

 

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I have one without the extra handle. I would have to go to the shop to see what the name is but it is something like Impact Driver as I recall. I don't use it often but has gotten me out of a couipl eof problems over the years. Bought it 40+ years ago. 

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6 hours ago, Bloo said:

Quick, sharp high pitched raps are what you want.

 

And that is what the tool applies!

 

The force needs to be rapping in along with rotational.

 

Here is a version of a bleeder screw removal version that is written about in the mechanic rags all the time:

 

https://www.toolsource.com/bleeders-c-1321_79_81/bleeder-screw-removing-kit-p-104559.html

 

Most important in this application is the pin that fits in the hole to prevent the screw from collapsing as it would if you simply hit it with a hammer.

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5 minutes ago, Frank DuVal said:

And that is what the tool applies!

 

I agree with you, and would like to own the tool, however I stick by the assertion that anything that goes on an air chisel lacks finesse, and on something important I probably wouldn't pull this tool out first.

 

It does look easier to use than an impact screwdriver.

 

That bleeder tool looks interesting as well.

 

 

Edited by Bloo (see edit history)
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