carbking

The Carburetor Shop Virtual Carburetor Museum

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Thanks Joe - so the little double brass tank with the funny looking figure 8 diaphragms that I hand cut, that I have always called a pump, is actually a fluid control valve?

 

On another note, looking for my picture of the AA carb to post, but haven't found it yet. May have to take another. I am not certain if I still have a BB or not.

 

Still a lot of exhibits to add, but can only do so much at one time.

 

Jon.

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Benefits of AACA Membership.

I have added several new exhibits today, and that will conclude the initial exhibits. Others will be added in the future.

 

Today's additions include:

 

Correcting the alcohol pump to alcohol control valve per Joe P.'s suggestion. Thank you Joe.

Pictures of the infamous Rochester type AA, and the one year only Rochester BB

The 1918 Oldsmobile 2-barrel that some enthusiasts keep calling a 4-barrel

Some rotary throttle carbs, including a prototype with gear drive on the throttle

The aftermarket Riley and Flynn high performance carburetors.

The Detroit Lubricator type 51 Cadillac V-12 carb.

The "high mileage" (along with a tooth fairy ;) ) Pogue and Fish carburetors.

 

Jon

 

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21 hours ago, carbking said:

Thanks Joe - so the little double brass tank with the funny looking figure 8 diaphragms that I hand cut, that I have always called a pump, is actually a fluid control valve?

 

That is correct.

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Posted (edited)

Here are a few photo's of my Miller HI-POWER. Note in my first post I called it a HI -Speed, memory plays tricks. I believe it was primarily sold along with the Miller head conversion for Model A Ford engines rather than any of Miller's

much more exotic racing engines. And thanks for the Master information you have added. Have you ever seen any material to support the story that it was at first a Miller product that was sold to Master ?

 

Greg

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Edited by 1912Staver (see edit history)

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According to Autoweek, Harry Miller founded the Miller Carburetor Company in 1909, sold the business in 1912, and founded the Master Carburetor Company in 1913.

 

I have never seen any factory Miller carburetor literature.

 

I do have quite a bit of Master carburetor literature, beginning in 1915, and the last dated one in 1918; so evidently, they were around for awhile.

 

We have sold quite a few conventional throttle carburetors to some pretty good restoration shops that were unable to make a rotary throttle carburetor work except idle and wide open throttle.

 

Jon.

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On 3/29/2020 at 3:50 PM, carbking said:

Lincoln did not use Johnson, they used Stromberg, and it was an excellent carburetor, absolutely no need to replace.

 

We have not yet found an updraft that will function in place of the Johnson because of the rainbow manifold, at least on the later cars.

 

At one time we offered a pair of Zenith for the V-12 and V-16 (no rainbow).

 

Personally, I if had a 1925 or earlier, I would at least try to see if one of the Chevy Carter BB-1's would clear. The flange arrangement is different on the 1926 and newer such that an adapter would be required; but the late Chevy BB-1 should bolt to the 1925 and earlier, IF there is sufficient clearance.

 

While I like to keep the old cars stock if possible, I simply cannot recommend using a Johnson on a vehicle that is driven. I would rather have a non-original carburetor than an original molten stack of metal. Some of the zinc ally carburetors (the Stromberg U-2 is one) can be, and has been recast in better metal. Recasting the Johnson would only make for a more expensive Johnson.

 

I am certain that someone of Ed's talents could keep one running, at least for awhile, but I still wouldn't ride with him ;) if he were using a Johnson

 

Jon.

 

Jon: How can we check if a BB-1 will clear? I am running a Johnson on a 1924 Cadillac V63.

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When trying to adapt a non-original carburetor, one needs to make a "picture" of the area beneath the intake manifold, with dimensions to the nearest obstruction in all directions. The "picture" must be indexed on the center of the hole in the intake (easier to simply measure the center to center on the mounting holes, then measure from one or the other and add or subtract the radius).

 

One can then do the same for the carburetor.

 

If the carburetor picture fits inside the picture under the manifold, the carburetor will fit.

 

Jon.

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Posted (edited)

Is there any material you need ? I don't want to open a can of worms but I do have some DB bulletines on Zenith updrafts that might be helpful to others (as an example), and I know your site has a lot of traffic from guys looking for that type of thing.

 

 

Edited by 30DodgePanel (see edit history)

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