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Marmon vs. Chrysler


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6 minutes ago, Steve9 said:

That Marmon is just the coolest! What size tires does it have?

 

Actually, there are two different Marmons here--I probably shouldn't have confused things with that second video. The first video shot from behind the wheel is the black 1930 Model 79 that's the topic of this thread.

 

The second video is footage of the blue 1932 Sixteen by Waterhouse we've had for a few months. That car is ENORMOUS--those are 18-inch wheels and 8.00-18 tires on a 154-inch chassis. We'll have the full ride & drive on that car in a few days and I'll be sure to post it.

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3 hours ago, Matt Harwood said:

 

We have a GoPro for most of our driving videos that takes some pretty awesome shots and has the most incredible stabilization software I've ever seen. I stuck it on the front fender of a 4BT diesel-powered Dodge Power Wagon that vibrated like a cement mixer and it's completely stable. Very impressive. If we do a test drive video for this car, we'll use that one. This was just spur of the moment when I was going out for a test drive after tweaking the carburetor a bit that I thought I'd shoot some footage for you guys. I took a second, longer drive just to make sure it was sorted and it does drive quite nicely. The gearbox is non-synchromesh but doesn't seem to like double-clutching, either. It's one of those things where you have to learn what the car likes before you can master it. Shifting slowly seems to help. I'll get it.

 

For our driving videos we usually use a GoPro. The image stabilization on those things is incredible. Check out this raw footage we shot today. The camera is mounted on the back of Melanie's Ford Focus RS which isn't the smoothest-riding car in the world. Pay attention to when we roll over the train tracks--they're completely eliminated on the Focus, but you can see the Marmon bounce over them. Very impressive technology.

 

That is very impressive stabilization. Impressive car too!

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In spite of the fact that '30 Marmon is a bit too modern for my likes? I really do like it. Wish I could afford it. Of course, if I had the money to consider it, I am sure I would find something a bit earlier that I would like better!

I am sure I haven't driven one twentieth the number of prewar cars Ed has, or maybe even Matt for that matter, but I have driven a fair number, collector cars mostly before synchromesh.

I don't care how many different cars or trucks one has driven. They are all slightly different. Some want to be shifted early at slow speed. Others want to be shifted at higher speeds. Some want the shift quick! Others like a long pause in neutral. Some demand double clutching up and down. A lot of them only need it on the down shift. ALL of them require learning to judge the relationship between road speeds and engine speeds in all gears. A person that is good at this? Can usually "get" a given car in a few blocks. Most cars take a fair number of miles to get really good with that particular car. Brass era cars are generally harder to shift than nickel era cars.

One also needs to learn the shift pattern for a given car. Not all cars used a standard "H" pattern. In fact quite a few cars didn't use an "H" pattern shift at all. A "progressive shift" is a whole another world!

 

One of my long-time best friends most of his working life worked for a private collector restoring, detailing, and sorting collector cars (mostly earlier than 1930). I suspect he has driven well over 200 such collector cars over the years!

Me? I never really liked driving other people's cars. Just part of the way I am. I have actually turned down many opportunities to drive some incredible cars over the years. 

 

Every time I see "the car that can’t be mentioned!” being mentioned,  I really get intrigued!  I try to imagine what it could possibly be? I think about the cars Jack Passey showed me! The unnamed collector my friend worked for (who was also along-time friend), and several lesser collectors with small (?) collections of fifty cars or less, many of them incredible by anyone's standards! When it becomes time to "share" this car (probably about Pebble Beach this year or next?)?  Am I going to be disappointed?

 

Be well all!

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On 3/30/2020 at 12:46 PM, FLYER15015 said:

Drive one of Ed's cars Gossp ? Good luck with that one...........

 

Greg, here you go. Too rough for Wayne C. Lucky me !!!

 

Mike in Colorado


 

 

 

Mike.........I have let countless true “car guys” drive my cars. And one who had never driven a pre war car more than 10 miles borrowed my 1936 Pierce 12 for eight days and put well over a thousand miles on it. I taught a 12 year old how to drive his first car on an enclosed track.......my 1932 Pierce coupe. So it’s not impossible to get to drive my car........most people just don’t ask.

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4 hours ago, edinmass said:

Mike.........I have let countless true “car guys” drive my cars. And one who had never driven a pre war car more than 10 miles borrowed my 1936 Pierce 12 for eight days and put well over a thousand miles on it. I taught a 12 year old how to drive his first car on an enclosed track.......my 1932 Pierce coupe. So it’s not impossible to get to drive my car........most people just don’t ask.

 

Don't forget Ed,  you also let me drive your Pierce 12.   I almost cut my hand off on a sharp turn with Pierce's idea of a vent window/Ginsu knife.

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Interesting conversation as to what the driving is like as well as the view out the windshield is like from  behind the wheel. I had two cars at the same time that gave the views that are discussed here - a 1931 Franklin with 11 1/2 inch Twilight headlamps on it and a 1933 Chrysler CT Eight. BOTH look good from behind the wheel! Can't say one was better then the other. Liked them both and never thought about which was "Better" to see that view - just was glad that I was fortunate enough to have the opportunity often to be able to do so!

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20 minutes ago, alsancle said:

 

Don't forget Ed,  you also let me drive your Pierce 12.   I almost cut my hand off on a sharp turn with Pierce's idea of a vent window/Ginsu knife.

 

That only occurs on a club sedan..............how about the e brake handle blocking your driver door exit when you try and exit the car?

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2 minutes ago, edinmass said:

 

That only occurs on a club sedan..............how about the e brake handle blocking your driver door exit when you try and exit the car?

 

That vent window isn't on the other body styles?   The e-brake was another bad idea.

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Just now, alsancle said:

 

That vent window isn't on the other body styles?   The e-brake was another bad idea.

 

Different size on the club sedan........when your driving a good looking cool car.............adaptations must be made.......

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12 hours ago, edinmass said:

 

 

Mike.........I have let countless true “car guys” drive my cars. And one who had never driven a pre war car more than 10 miles borrowed my 1936 Pierce 12 for eight days and put well over a thousand miles on it. I taught a 12 year old how to drive his first car on an enclosed track.......my 1932 Pierce coupe. So it’s not impossible to get to drive my car........most people just don’t ask.


Many years ago I drove a pierce 12 from Indianapolis to Hershey and back. By far the finest classic era car I have driven... and I have had wheel time on a couple of big boys... Packard 12’s, a Duesenberg J, a caddy 16... 

 

My heart is in the early stuff but I still have a dream that is a PA 12 with overdrive. Amazing car that owned the interstate. 

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7 hours ago, Steve9 said:

Speaking of ginzu, can you imagine what happens here in case of a wreck?

Steve, it looks like he put some door edge guard around the hole. I'm no enngineer but I'd say he's good to go.

😄

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On 4/3/2020 at 4:52 PM, edinmass said:

With probably only a few exceptions, I have driven more pre war cars than 99.9 percent of people in the old car hobby, and I have observed the following.................

 

Most any old pre war car is rather fun, unique, and enjoyable to drive. They all have their pluses and minuses, but each time I take a new platform for a spin, it always puts a smile on my face. The perfect old car? There isn’t one, that’s why it’s imperative we own as many as possible............

 

At a PAS meet I heard someone joke that when the wife asks how many pre-war cars is enough, he always replies - Just one more.  😀

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Since I don't drive and use a camera I had to take a shot while I was a passenger in our Pierce.

What better view could there be than one with those magnificent headlights out past a nice, long hood?

Kindly ignore the 'patina' on the cowl.  🤣

 

IMG_0240.JPG

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6 minutes ago, zepher said:

Since I don't drive and use a camera I had to take a shot while I was a passenger in our Pierce.

What better view could there be than one with those magnificent headlights out past a nice, long hood?

Kindly ignore the 'patina' on the cowl.  🤣

 

IMG_0240.JPG

 

That right head light looks like its positioned perfectly to hit that SUV with a rocket.

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