Kfigel

1922 Studebaker Tools

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Finally went through the various tools that came with my car and was wondering if someone could help me on the following:

The car came with an antique Simplex No. 41 jack.  Knowing that this company was in business from the 1800's this would have been original to the car, correct?

Did these cars come with any type of tool kit?

I have three steel bars with flattened ends.  Are these special tools for the car?  Thanks,

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The tool on the left in the top picture is correct if you have the Michelin Disc Wheel option. The other two are not part of the vehicle’s tool kit.

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4 minutes ago, Stude Light said:

The tool on the left in the top picture is correct if you have the Michelin Disc Wheel option. The other two are not part of the vehicle’s tool kit.

I do have the disk wheels.  I'm guessing you use it to remove the "snap ring" from the wheel?

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The center tool is a modern tire iron, that one on the right is a tire iron for the Model A Ford tool kit.

 

 

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17 minutes ago, Mark Wetherbee said:

The center tool is a modern tire iron, that one on the right is a tire iron for the Model A Ford tool kit.

 

 

Thanks 

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Years ago I had a 24 special 6. There was a parts manual that showed the tools, maybe someone find you a copy of it so you know what they look like...

 

Good luck 

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Posted (edited)

The disk wheel tool was used to install the wheel assembly on to the hub  when installing on the car.  Tool was inserted into a stud hole in the wheel and the cupped end was place over the stud (concave side down) and the wheel assembly could then be picked up and slid over the stud/hub. Below is the entire tool kit for your car.

Scott

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Edited by Stude Light (see edit history)
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Here are the disk wheel tools as shown in the parts manual - part numbers 39928 and 39929.  Also is the tool kit for my Light Six (different from the Special/Big Six tools previously posted) which includes the two disk wheel tools shown.  The Light Six tool kit shares some of the tools with the other models and is shown in the owners manual (I didn't include that since it doesn't apply to your car).  You can also see the tool bag which was patterned after an original (including colors) which would be similar to the Special/Big Six bag.

Scott

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1 hour ago, George Rohrbach said:

Stude Light - Great kit you put together! 

Thanks George.  A number of the tools came with the car but I had to hunt down a few others. I was lucky to have a fellow Studebaker owner that had an original Studebaker tool bag.

 

In the picture is the proper use of the original Michelin/Budd Disk Wheel tool in question and why such a simple tool was important. You can also see the nut driver on the ground. These wheels were created as a collaborative project between the Budd Stamping Company (Philadelphia, PA) and the Michelin Company (France) as an improvement over the wood spoke wheels and were proposed to the OEMs of that time. Studebaker began offering them as an option in 1920. They became standard equipment in 1922 on the Big Six and remained an option on the Light and Special Sixes. When the car was ordered, the tool kit that was provided was tailored to have the correct tool set for the wheels that came on it (wood, wire, disc).

Scott

 

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Posted (edited)

Thanks everyone for all the input, especially the photos and list of tools for my Big Six.  After looking at that it looks like more of the original tools came with my car than I thought.  They are shown in the attached photo.  I believe that shown is original including the tool bag and grease gun.  I now know what I will have to fill in to try and complete my set.

One thing...the two smaller open end wrenches do not have any markings on them, just plain; the largest open end wrench on the far right is stamped Armstrong with their logo.  I'm thinking this wrench is not original.  I know Armstrong tools was in business in the 1920's out of Chicago.  My car spent it's whole life in a town about 30 minutes south of Chicago which is how this wrench might have ended up in its tool box.  Any thoughts?

Studebaker Tool Kit .JPG

Edited by Kfigel (see edit history)

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Posted (edited)

Yes, looks like you have quite a few of the original tools. 👍 Like most OEMs of the day, Studebaker didn't always buy their tools from the same supplier.  In their literature they show a couple of different tire pumps (minor differences) but with the same part number.  I have seen a couple original tool sets with different manufacturers for the wrenches, although they were the same shape and size.  Most of their wrenches were from the Fairmount Tool and Forging Company and typically had Fairmount Cleve (for Cleveland, OH) embossed letters.  The jack is definitely incorrect but the Big/Special Six originals are fairly easy to identify (say Studebaker on side) and find. They were made by the Buckeye Jack Company. The Light Six jacks are harder to find (take a tapered round wood handle vs the flat steel one shown in the parts manual). Not sure about the tool bag.  It doesn't match the photo or have enough tool slots but who knows.. I know the original Light Six bag I patterned from had a darker trim around the edge and a strap with a metal buckle end. The oil can isn't the right one (the side looks squared off in the photo - should have nice rounded top) but, again, easy to find those.

 

The grease gun, hand crank, tire repair kit, Michelin tire tool and all the wrenches look correct. If you look on the parts manual page I scanned, I had some notes on the wrench end sizes (in today's numbers) in the left margin.  By the way, the 90 degree bent wrench with the tapered square ends (which is probably original) was for rotating the floorboard locks - part number 23827 pictured below. Do a little eBay searching and have a little patience and you'll be surprised to find most of what you need.  Suggested searches "Studebaker Jack", Fairmount Cleve", "Studebaker Hub Wrench", "Vintage Thumb Oiler", "Vintage Hand Tire Pump". Good luck.

Scott

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Edited by Stude Light (see edit history)

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11 hours ago, Stude Light said:

Yes, looks like you have quite a few of the original tools. 👍 Like most OEMs of the day, Studebaker didn't always buy their tools from the same supplier.  In their literature they show a couple of different tire pumps (minor differences) but with the same part number.  I have seen a couple original tool sets with different manufacturers for the wrenches, although they were the same shape and size.  Most of their wrenches were from the Fairmount Tool and Forging Company and typically had Fairmount Cleve (for Cleveland, OH) embossed letters.  The jack is definitely incorrect but the Big/Special Six originals are fairly easy to identify (say Studebaker on side) and find. They were made by the Buckeye Jack Company. The Light Six jacks are harder to find (take a tapered round wood handle vs the flat steel one shown in the parts manual). Not sure about the tool bag.  It doesn't match the photo or have enough tool slots but who knows.. I know the original Light Six bag I patterned from had a darker trim around the edge and a strap with a metal buckle end. The oil can isn't the right one (the side looks squared off in the photo - should have nice rounded top) but, again, easy to find those.

 

The grease gun, hand crank, tire repair kit, Michelin tire tool and all the wrenches look correct. If you look on the parts manual page I scanned, I had some notes on the wrench end sizes (in today's numbers) in the left margin.  By the way, the 90 degree bent wrench with the tapered square ends (which is probably original) was for rotating the floorboard locks - part number 23827 pictured below. Do a little eBay searching and have a little patience and you'll be surprised to find most of what you need.  Suggested searches "Studebaker Jack", Fairmount Cleve", "Studebaker Hub Wrench", "Vintage Thumb Oiler", "Vintage Hand Tire Pump". Good luck.

Scott

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Thanks for all the info, Scott.  Good leads for me to follow to start to fill in my set.  I would like a tool kit that's as original as possible.  Ken 

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Question-  On the Disc wheels,  do you just pry the ring off and change the rubber tire, then put the ring back on? 

That is how I read the ad.  Seems easy enough. It must be the later split rings that were dangerous?

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10 hours ago, (S) said:

Question-  On the Disc wheels,  do you just pry the ring off and change the rubber tire, then put the ring back on? 

That is how I read the ad.  Seems easy enough. It must be the later split rings that were dangerous?

My only experience with this is that I recently removed the tires from two of my '22 disk wheels.  (I'm going to have a restoration shop install new tires & tubes on them).  I carefully pried the "split ring" off using a small pry bar in the rectangular hole that is at one end of the ring.  The rings were definitely under tension so be very careful, but they did come off ok. From there it was easy enough to remove the old tire and tube.  

I don't know if some split rings are more dangerous than other years, but I would sure take it slow and be careful.  

Others may know if there is a difference or a specific tool that should be used.  Hope this helps.    

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12 hours ago, (S) said:

Question-  On the Disc wheels,  do you just pry the ring off and change the rubber tire, then put the ring back on? 

That is how I read the ad.  Seems easy enough. It must be the later split rings that were dangerous?

Besides strength, durability and lighter weight, the big benefit of the disc wheels was the ease of repairing a flat tire (i.e. patching the tube).  Flats were very common in the teens and twenties due to all the horseshoe nails on the roads. With a roadside flat, you changed out the disc wheel spare just like you do today - as a tire/wheel assembly with lug nuts.  This wasn't a whole lot different than changing out the rim/tire assembly on the artillery (wood spoke) design other than it just used the 5 or 6 lug nuts to attach it versus more attachment hardware that was typical of most of the artillery wheel designs.  The disc wheel/tire assembly was probably a bit heavier than the rim/tire assembly used on an artillery wheel, which is why they made that simple tool that allowed you to slide the wheel up over the stud.

 

As mentioned, the real benefit was when you had the put a patch on your tube.  Getting the tire off the disc wheel was really easy compared to the artillery wheel split rim design. First, just a mention on the split rims....those attach to the artillery wheels and are split across the entire cross section of the rim.  A rim spreader makes the job easier but it still isn't nearly as easy as the split ring design wheels. Split rims can also be a hazard when pressurizing and there are a number of different designs to lock the halves together, some more robust than others. 

 

The disc wheels have a detachable split ring. To remove the tire, first you deflate the tire, insert a screwdriver into the slot in the ring (pictured) and pry up.  Once you get it started you just pry the ring off the rim and the tire/tube assembly slides right off.  Since mine have the 90 degree nickeled valve stem sticking through the rim, there is also a nut that has to be removed to get the tube off. Once you patch the tube, just slide the tire back over the rim and put the split ring back in place.  This Michelin design has a really deep locking groove, deeper than other designs I serviced from the 1960s/70s. I would imagine that they all have their hazard issue - maybe some designs more than others.  The hazard is on initial fill and if the ring wasn't seated correctly.  I'm not sure how you couldn't get these Michelin designs correctly installed but I'm sure someone figured out how to screw that up.  Regardless, I did take precautions during initial fill.

Scott

 

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Ken,

Replying to your PM question...this is the original oil can. Note the design of the threaded base on the spout and compare to yours - you can see it matches the tool kit photo from the parts manual.  Just like other tools, I'm sure there were more than one oil can manufacturer, so you never know. It measures 3.5" across the base and is common to all the Studebaker models from the early 1920s.  The brazed one you have is only 3.25" wide so, it is not correct.

Scott

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Thanks guys!   As to that oil can-  We had old dealer stock and never knew some of these were  probably Studebaker!   

 

I am learning all the time thanks to your knowledge.   ( and great pictures ! )

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