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Hassler Shocks (Snubbers) on 1928 Chrysler


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So it appears these shocks were a big accessory for the Model T fords.  So much that if you Google it all you find are references to the Model T.  Was it the same shock for both the Ford and Chrysler? If not how can you tell the difference?  Model Number, size?  Very obscure.........help.

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  • 9 months later...

This thread appears to be one year old now, but I have recently acquired a 1928 Model 52 Chrysler that came equipped with Snubbers. They are in sad condition, one has the cloth severed and the other is holding on by threads.  I'd like to remove them and rebuild them. Has anyone found the material used for replacement from any vendors?

 

thanks,
Mark

 

IMG_8595.JPG

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39 minutes ago, my48ruby said:

This thread appears to be one year old now, but I have recently acquired a 1928 Model 52 Chrysler that came equipped with Snubbers. They are in sad condition, one has the cloth severed and the other is holding on by threads.  I'd like to remove them and rebuild them. Has anyone found the material used for replacement from any vendors?

 

thanks,
Mark

 

 

The style of the shocks just visible on your car indicate that you are looking for wires to replace, is that correct? If it is the woven style of shock snubbers you are after, I believe companies offering these come up on a google search?

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  • 1 month later...
On 1/14/2021 at 10:15 AM, Narve N said:

The style of the shocks just visible on your car indicate that you are looking for wires to replace, is that correct? If it is the woven style of shock snubbers you are after, I believe companies offering these come up on a google search?

 

The appear to be cloth spring dampers, cloth is something like you find on the exterior of a fire hose.  I will search online to see if these can be rebuilt at home or if they must be sent out.  Not sure about your comment about wires.  There's no wires connected to these dampers that I can see.

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Snubber material is no longer available, Restoration Supply sews hood lace together and sells it. It looks and works just like the original material. I bought hood lace and had it sewed together for my '30 Chrysler Brougham.

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This may be an option.  I believe I read somewhere that if the woven material breaks between the snubber and where it is clamped on the axel you can pull more woven material down out of the snubber and by putting a nail? into a hole in the snubber housing the tension on the internal spring will be held while you re-clamp the woven material back on the axel.  I don't know how susceptible that woven material is to dry or wet rot but being incased in grease my have a positive effect on retarding aging. 

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  • 2 months later...

Another issue here.  How do you properly take the slack out of the woven band before anchoring it?  Apparently what I was lead to believe about setting a nail into the shock spring to hold the tension is not the case.

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Posted (edited)

Hi Sasha39, thank you, yes there are some similarities and then differences too.  For instance the Hassler shock has the wound spring inside the canister and the "strap" attaches outside using a two sided metal bracket that pinches the strap between it and uses rivets to hold it in place.  A metal pin appears to be how the bracket holding the strap is attached to the end of the spring which protrudes from the canister.  I like the way the Watson shock has a procedure to attach the strap to the frame and then tighten the tension by winding the spring inside the canister.  I've not figured out how this is done with the Hassler's.  Inside the Hassler canister is the spring bathed in chassis grease from an external zerk fitting.  I don't really know if I'm going to get into cleaning out any of that mess because these shocks were not known for being that effective even when they were new.  I will change the straps hopefully with something that will not break causing me to loose the bolted clip which holds the strap to the lug on the frame while driving.  Here is another thought that I posted under the technical heading:

Looking at the McMaster-Carr online site there are several types of rolled fabric webbing 1 1/2 inches wide which can be used to replace the straps on Hassler shocks (snubbers).  The question is strength.  These webbings are rated at a breaking strength of 2200 lbs for cotton with a nylon core up to 5100 lbs for nylon.  Does anyone know what the composition and strength was attributed to the original fabric straps used on Hassler shocks?

 
Edited by leomara (see edit history)
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