Mark Gregory

Look at what this man did to a burnt 1934 Riley Lynx

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Benefits of AACA Membership.

Wow!

That had to be a labor of love.

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Posted (edited)

What am I missing here?

 

This clearly is not the same car unless aside from perhaps being a 'frame doner'.   The fenders, which appeared to be salvageable, are not the same ones as seen in the above photos, and there are convertible top bows shown, which makes me believe it was a touring, not a 2-seat roadster as the 'after' photo shows.  

 

Craig

Edited by 8E45E (see edit history)
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I think you are on the right track Craig.  Most likely just the frame and some of the major castings re used,  possibly  not even the frame except as a pattern for a new one. But still a great outcome from what many would have seen as a complete and total loss. 

 

Greg in Canada

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1934 Riley Lynx Burned Wreck Restored - Phoenix Book Review

 

Seat frames, or pans, may have been re-used.

 

Image result for Riley Lynx

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Here is another link with more detail on the car. I guess you could call it a British Speedster. It also appears that they wrote a book about this car’s journey. No matter what you may think about it, there is real craftsmanship involved in building an aluminum over ash body. I could never own a car like this, I’d drive it too much.

Phoenix Special

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The aluminum melted in the fire, which must explain the cover for the differential is missing, it melted away.

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There have been a number of heroic restorations of significant cars badly damaged in fires over the years. A massive undertaking usually reserve for truly exceptional cars. It's great that someone took on a task like this for a desirable but not super valuable car like a production Riley.

 

Greg

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Nice save! I painted a 1933 Riley IMP years ago they are great cars. Bob 

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I have been told that if a car burns outside there is a chance of repairing it, if it burns in a building it reaches temperature high enough to distort and take the temper out of the metal and it will never be any good again even as parts.

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I don't care if it is only the horn button he retained, great build.

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I had a friend who’s business garage burned. He had a few big trucks in the garage with the typical garage stuff like oxy/acetylene, etc. way up front in an alcove, he had three harleys parked. All three motor/transmissions melted into globs under each frame and the two with aluminum wheels had the same globs where the wheels once were. There was no one part salvageable and they were way up front away from the hottest parts of the fire. The blaze made the news with quite a few departments responding and incredible live footage of explosions with things getting hurled over a couple hundred feet into the air! 

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Nice story, and if you follow the article it clearly indicates that the Riley Lynx remains became a Riley Special.  They were great cars.

Terry

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The next time some guy says it's ok to make a hot rod or rat rod because the car was too far gone I'll show them these pictures! 

 

Thanks Mark Gregory for this post!

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At what point does it go from a restoration to a replica?........just asklng......bob

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1 hour ago, Bhigdog said:

At what point does it go from a restoration to a replica?........just asklng......bob

 

 

Good question, but in this case it has become a Riley Special, something unique in the UK Vintage Sports Car world. Bob 

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Posted (edited)
2 hours ago, Bhigdog said:

At what point does it go from a restoration to a replica?........just asklng......bob

Reminds me of Lincolns (or was it Washingtons ?) axe...

 

OTOH, there are many examples and stories of complete rebuilds, recreations or “restorations” done around just a V.I.N.-plate or less...

Edited by TTR (see edit history)
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Posted (edited)

A couple of the cars I have restored I was told they were beyond restoration before I started. It is amazing what can actually be straightened and made decent again.

I sometimes jokingly refer to some of the cars I have done as "resurrections"!

Someday, I should again tell of the 1912 wide-track model T touring car a good friend of mine restored. Almost miraculously, another good friend and his wife survived being hit by a big semi doing about 70 mph. After settling with the insurance companies, he GAVE the wreckage (several thousand dollars worth of salvageable parts!) to the other good friend as he had a reputation as the go-to guy to fix the unfixable. Almost everything except one rear wheel was repaired. The original wood was repaired, even the original hood which landed on the highway and was run over by about a dozen cars was repaired!

 

I have known of a few hot fire cars that were restored, and know of one being worked on now.

 

It CAN be done!

 

Thanks for the thread and all the comments. While that particular car may not be exactly what it was, at least it can be enjoyed again.

Edited by wayne sheldon (see edit history)
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15 hours ago, mike6024 said:

1934 Riley Lynx Burned Wreck Restored - Phoenix Book Review

 

Seat frames, or pans, may have been re-used.

 

Image result for Riley Lynx

If the car was insured to be rebuilt, and not a cash settlement for the loss, it would have to go back to its 'as was' state, which would be like this car above. 

 

Craig

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On 3/22/2020 at 3:09 PM, richasco said:

Here is another link with more detail on the car. I guess you could call it a British Speedster. It also appears that they wrote a book about this car’s journey. No matter what you may think about it, there is real craftsmanship involved in building an aluminum over ash body. I could never own a car like this, I’d drive it too much.

Phoenix Special

There is a write-up on this rebuild in the current (May, 2020) Thoroughbred & Classic Cars magazine.

 

Craig

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When does a re-build become closer to a scratch build?

 

Cheers,

Grog

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Some things can't bedone . I had a fire in my garage , lost all the cares ,I rebuilt my 66 Ply conv Has been back on the road for a few years now . Have done a few national tours with no problems . I don't see why people  say things can't be done . I am not a pro restorer . Kings32

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