Boston

The perfect tour car

Recommended Posts

That's true, but anyone can drive a Model T after a lesson or two. Drivers who are not hardcore car nuts would probably have a tougher time with the unsynchronized 3 speed in a Model A. Mitchell makes synchronized gears that will go in a Model A transmission case, but it raises the cost.

 

I do like the idea of a Model A.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites


Benefits of AACA Membership.

On 3/11/2020 at 7:23 PM, Wade Lanning said:

Can someone tell me what year and make of car this is?  Obviously the fenders have been cut back and it looks like the side of the hood is missing too.

Jacks Car in 1955.jpeg

4.thumb.jpg.9eaf0e66cb79c7d598390e60e1971b2b.jpg

 

 

Suppose the first picture was on it's way to this?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

For some reason, an ad for this thing just popped up for me. It seems to address many of your issues: old(ish) vehicle, electric power, reliable, but there's no mention of price or affordability.

 

https://go.mokeamerica.com/

 

207ff101-screenshot-2019-11-29-at-2-23-2

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 3/14/2020 at 10:52 PM, chistech said:

They are very reliable, that’s why I mentioned them. These days they are a bargain and going with a 17’ to 27’ will get you electric start and the best versions of the de mountable rims. If towing out of the parks is so expensive, simply keep a open trailer and pickup there to rescue a stranded tour car. The T will also give very decent fuel mileage. I would update any car purchased with a water pump and Kevlar transmission bands. If you purchase cars that are currently being used you will have little to do to get them ready. Another good thing is while a water pump helps, it’s not necessary as the cooling system was designed to work on thermal principal of heat rises so while a pump would help, if really hot and barely moving,  and you lost a fan belt, it would’ve the end of the world. The worst thing about using the T’s is there would be no AC other than good old mother nature’s fresh air! I know a guy who could probably set you up with quite a few Ts, priced right, to get you started. Super guy to deal with and I know that personally as I bought my 32’ Olds from him.


You have my attention. 

Someone nailed it when they said that a replica might not offer the feel of an antique and diminish from the experience. I'm tempted to agree. I wouldn't worry about AC as much as a heater and I can likely retrofit something. I do like the Fordor 😉 it has the look and the view people would like. 

So is there a way to contact through some more private means on this thing and get in touch with that guy you mention ? 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I would vote for a Model A. I have a 1911 T and 1936 Ford. The T is easy on parts but tricky  to drive in mountainous national parks with out a second gear and back seat passengers adding weight. The early V8 fords when running are great but mine has not run right since I got it. Fuel system issues are my current problem that an electric fuel pump will solve. The Model A has a gravity fuel system, simpler electrical system than an T or V8 and has three gears and four wheel brakes making it perfect for most cooler weather National Parks.( can even put in manifold heater or some closed A's have had A/C added.  A standard A will run easy at 45MPH all day and easy to master shifting using a double clutch and are fine with back seat passengers. Add that to reasonable parts and tire availability via internet or phone arriving in day or so. If you want to go faster or worry about shifting the overdrive transmissions are available. 

 

Tom

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, Boston said:


You have my attention. 

Someone nailed it when they said that a replica might not offer the feel of an antique and diminish from the experience. I'm tempted to agree. I wouldn't worry about AC as much as a heater and I can likely retrofit something. I do like the Fordor 😉 it has the look and the view people would like. 

So is there a way to contact through some more private means on this thing and get in touch with that guy you mention ? 

PM me and I’ll put you in touch with him. Great guy, has national contacts when it comes to early fords, and he’ll treat you right. He also has damn near every part you’ll ever need and could tell you and possibly supply you with any upgrade that would make the cars fit your purpose any better.

ted

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
21 hours ago, Matt Harwood said:

For some reason, an ad for this thing just popped up for me. It seems to address many of your issues: old(ish) vehicle, electric power, reliable, but there's no mention of price or affordability.

 

https://go.mokeamerica.com/

 

207ff101-screenshot-2019-11-29-at-2-23-2

 

I thought these were only sold and used in Hawaii.

Guess you learn something every day.

 

Mike in Colorado

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 3/14/2020 at 5:57 PM, Boston said:

OK so something Christech said


What is the most bomb proof antique tour car ? 

The one pictured is a 1924 fordor Ford LOL It's not expensive, customers would love it. speeds are 45 and below in the park. So how reliable are these old fords. 

image.jpeg


Prior to all this virus thing hitting this was the front runner

It just looks like something I'd like to take a tour of the park in. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My first choice would be an old style body on a new truck chassis like the Asquith or equivalent.

https://cdn-cms.f-static.net/uploads/1865660/2000_5c72fcc6df52e.jpg

 

Next would be a Chrysler or DeSoto six cylinder sedan or limousine 1938 - 1948. One of the roomiest most comfortable cars made.  They are very reliable, easy to drive, and all mechanical parts are available cheap. There are disc brake conversions available if desired. This illustrates the stock sedan, they made a long wheelbase limousine that carries 8 passengers, they are not very rare or expensive as Chrysler 8 pass sedan or DeSoto Suburban with roof rack. Mr Cunningham drove a Suburban in Happy Days.

 

image.jpeg.bfaf6dff122abfd0da37f7cd39d54ada.jpeg

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Appreciate the thought but those big busses are a nightmare to pull over and park around here. 

Its gotta be something small like the Fordor 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 3/14/2020 at 10:52 PM, chistech said:

They are very reliable, that’s why I mentioned them. These days they are a bargain and going with a 17’ to 27’ will get you electric start and the best versions of the de mountable rims. If towing out of the parks is so expensive, simply keep a open trailer and pickup there to rescue a stranded tour car. The T will also give very decent fuel mileage. I would update any car purchased with a water pump and Kevlar transmission bands. If you purchase cars that are currently being used you will have little to do to get them ready. Another good thing is while a water pump helps, it’s not necessary as the cooling system was designed to work on thermal principal of heat rises so while a pump would help, if really hot and barely moving,  and you lost a fan belt, it would’ve the end of the world. The worst thing about using the T’s is there would be no AC other than good old mother nature’s fresh air! I know a guy who could probably set you up with quite a few Ts, priced right, to get you started. Super guy to deal with and I know that personally as I bought my 32’ Olds from him.

Who's your friend Christech ? I'd like t contact if I can 😉 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)

Having a bit of a time finding commercial auto insurance  for an antique car. Any ideas ? I'm still exploring all my costs and am pretty much down to insurance at this point. 

Thanks 😉

PS just left Hagardy a note, we'll see if they get back to me. The NPS requirements are pretty tight 

$500,000 liability
$1,000,000 per occurrence 
 

Commercial auto insurance provides: 

1.Liability insurance, which includes coverage for bodily injury, property damage, uninsured motorists, and underinsuredmotorists;

 

2.Physical damage insurance, which includes collision insurance; and;

 

3.Other coverage, which includes medical payments, towing and labor, rental reimbursement, and auto loan coverage.

 

Taxis that do not provide tour services are only required to have Auto Liability insurance. The Commercial General Liability covers out of vehicle activities and taxis do not provide out of vehicle activities. 

Insurance Company Minimum Standards 

The CUA Application defines various terms, conditions, and requirements for CUA insurance. 

The NPS has established the following minimum insurance company requirements. All insurance companies must meet the following minimum standards. These standards apply to foreign insurance companies as well as domestic companies. 

1.All insurers for all coverages must be rated no lower than A- by the most recent edition of Best’s Key Rating Guide (Property-Casualty edition), or similar insurance rating companies (Moody’s, Standard and Poor’s, or Fitch), unless otherwise authorizedby the Service.

 

2.All insurers for all coverages must have Best’s Financial Size Category of at least VII according to the most recent edition ofBest’s Key Rating Guide (Property-Casualty edition), or similar insurance rating companies (Moody’s, Standard and Poor’s, orFitch), unless otherwise authorized by the Service

 

3.The insurance ratings must be submitted with the CUA Application. The rating companies do not issue certificates. Werequire the insurance broker to note this rating in the Certificate. If the rating does not appear on the certificate, theinsurance broker must provide it in another document. 

 

PPS 
Christech I haven't called your buddy yet, I'm still getting some ducks lined up. Working on the medical requirements and insurance at the moment, purchasing the vehicle is the final step, and that assuming the Park is processing applications, they're on hold for the moment. 

Page 

Edited by Boston (see edit history)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You know the Model T only has room for 3 passengers plus the driver and not very roomy for today's larger tourists?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)

There is a company here in Detroit that does tours of the city  & Belle Isle State Park in Model A's.  You might call them and see if they might help to direct you to an insurance/ carrier.

 

Here is their web site.  https://antiquetouring.com

Edited by Larry Schramm (see edit history)
  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Rusty_OToole said:

You know the Model T only has room for 3 passengers plus the driver and not very roomy for today's larger tourists?


Yes, I was just looking at that and exploring some of the 7 passenger touring cars. They're more expensive but more people = more revenue. I was hoping Ford made a three seater touring car but If they did I haven't found it yet. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm a Ford Model A guy and that would be the hands down choice for me. Reliable, plentiful, easy to maintain, double the horsepower of a Model T and better brakes which can easily be converted to hydraulics. Parts are available from many sources and bodies like the station wagon pictured are available giving a five passenger capacity.

1930 ford model a station wagon.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 4/9/2020 at 10:43 PM, Rusty_OToole said:

Next would be a Chrysler or DeSoto six cylinder sedan or limousine 1938 - 1948. One of the roomiest most comfortable cars made.  They are very reliable, easy to drive, and all mechanical parts are available cheap. There are disc brake conversions available if desired. This illustrates the stock sedan, they made a long wheelbase limousine that carries 8 passengers, they are not very rare or expensive as Chrysler 8 pass sedan or DeSoto Suburban with roof rack. Mr Cunningham drove a Suburban in Happy Days.

Here in Ontario I there's a Desoto limo, must be a 5 or 6 ft vintage stretch at a junkyard, but the owner doesn't wanting to sell it. Never seen another like it. Its' just sitting there out in the elements.

Keith

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)

There is a 1950 Chrysler straight eight limo in Peterborough. They are asking $6500. It's more or less in one piece and doesn't look too rusty but needs everything. Been for sale for quite a while, I think it's over priced but what it would take to buy it is anybody's guess. I would look for a better one even if it cost more, they are not an expensive car even in good shape.

On closer reading of the ad it seems to include 2 parts cars so maybe not such a bad deal if you want a big, big project.

https://www.kijiji.ca/v-classic-cars/peterborough/1950-chrysler-imperial-crown-limousine-1-of-250-built/1494692276

Edited by Rusty_OToole (see edit history)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)

A few options:

 

https://www.facebook.com/marketplace/item/903684253414908/

 

https://www.facebook.com/marketplace/item/229604325115781/

 

https://www.facebook.com/marketplace/item/2624572817868034/

 

Option three is a good looking, running 1950 Straight 8 New Yorker. Must Go it says. Open to offers. Starting price $7K. Negotiate from there. I see an 8V battery in it. 

 

 

Edited by keithb7 (see edit history)
  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Too many doors.

Just went to the grocery store. Nice weather but had no desire to put top down. Anyone else feel that way ?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The shots of the woody wagon gave me an idea. Some years back a friend of mine put an early fifties International pickup cab and front end on a late model Chev pickup chassis. He said it was not hard, the body mounts weren't even that far off.

 

What if you could combine a good low mileage late model pickup chassis with a pickup cab and front end from the forties or fifties, and build a woody station wagon body? There are kits of wood parts that can be adapted to different chassis and wheelbases. You could have a cool looking rubberneck wagon with all around visibility, vintage looks and modern roadability and reliability. It wouldn't be cheap but what is these days?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)
On 3/14/2020 at 7:15 PM, chistech said:

I have to say Model T fords are cheap and very reliable. Not expensive to fix with parts everywhere. Depot hacks for larger groups, touring cars for the smaller group or couple. Add Rocky Mountain brakes if needed. I see decent Ts going for $6-8000. Not hard to drive once the driver learns and the main draw is the people road in an original of the first mass produced automobile. They are good in mud and snow also. People probably think I’m crazy but we couldn’t kill ours, couldn’t even come close. It was all original except for the aftermarket water pump. 

Ts would be great if you are not in a hurry. Get 4 passengers loaded with steep hills holding up traffic with horns blowing when they pass will kill the mood if you get a yahoo behind you. But it is a great adventure in a T but a two speed rear end and hydraulic brakes will be a must.

 The old mountain wagon would be much better fitting with a modern drive line as said above.

46e3f6f12d54555a92d6538ebc915db6.jpg

Edited by Joe in Canada (see edit history)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Well my latest pick is this thing. 

The idea of going with just tours for two is distancing. In the new world distancing will be of concern to many visiting the park and it's important to offer I think, more private tours. 

It's a bit more expensive, I'd prefer to find an old Ford of similar configuration. I gotta call the guys Christech suggested on that. 

1926-cadillac-314-7-passenger-touring.jpeg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now