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Period images to relieve some of the stress


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23 hours ago, 58L-Y8 said:

Does this help to reveal the details?

'36 Auburn 852 speedster, Roosevelt Field, Garden City, LINY.jpg

scan ... NC14131, Serial Number 3995, WACO YKC, purchased by News. Syndicate ... per:  https://www.libraries.wright.edu/special/collectionguides/files/ms343.pdf  and http://www.airhistory.org.uk/gy/reg_N46.html

 

And here is a photo:  http://nationalwacoclub.com/ukcalbum/slides/1934 Waco YKC NC14131.html

 

1934 Waco YKC NC14131.JPG

Edited by John_Mereness (see edit history)
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34 minutes ago, Matt Harwood said:

 

At that time, the Packard was only about 35 years old. It's like us going to a show today and looking at a 1985 model. Amazing how perspectives have changed. Is it because technology changed so radically then and not so much today? Even in 1949, that Packard was vastly different than a new 1949 car. Today a 1985 car is more or less the same as a new car.

Yes, think of that Packard roadster with its gas lamps, crank start, wood wheels, exposed chassis, no roll up windows no windshield wiper, right hand drive etc.  It is like comparing the airplanes of the era of the Packard to an airplane in 1949 - open cockpit bi plane to enclosed tin goose. Not only did technology advance but styling as well.

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It's like the difference between showing my son a 50 year old Duesenberg 35 years ago.

003.thumb.jpg.f7467eb8b152f895ef64ffa1958d8cd2.jpg.

 

And a 70 year old Packard today, 35 years later.

image.jpeg.59f5daab1743637debb7c6cbb9c1cff5.jpeg

 

BTW, In that first picture he was carrying a toy Auburn Rubber red and yellow coupe. Grimy's good friend walked past us and said "Pretty good toy you gave your boy".

Bernie

 

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1 hour ago, Matt Harwood said:

 

At that time, the Packard was only about 35 years old. It's like us going to a show today and looking at a 1985 model. Amazing how perspectives have changed. Is it because technology changed so radically then and not so much today? Even in 1949, that Packard was vastly different than a new 1949 car. Today a 1985 car is more or less the same as a new car.

 

 

I'd guess that Packard was part of the Rod Blood collection. Far more 1985-2020 used  crap for you to sell, some people recognize quality now as they did back at the time this photo was taken. Bob 

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53 minutes ago, 60FlatTop said:

It's like the difference between showing my son a 50 year old Duesenberg 35 years ago.

003.thumb.jpg.f7467eb8b152f895ef64ffa1958d8cd2.jpg.

 

And a 70 year old Packard today, 35 years later.

image.jpeg.59f5daab1743637debb7c6cbb9c1cff5.jpeg

 

BTW, In that first picture he was carrying a toy Auburn Rubber red and yellow coupe. Grimy's good friend walked past us and said "Pretty good toy you gave your boy".

Bernie

 

My dad makes the comment all the time that when we first started collecting the cars we bought were only 30 to 40 years old - and now they are 80 and 90 years old. 

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18 minutes ago, John_Mereness said:

My dad makes the comment all the time that when we first started collecting the cars we bought were only 30 to 40 years old - and now they are 80 and 90 years old. 

 

Same with the people...

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This is my great uncle Charlie May with his 1954 Studebaker Commander. Not sure the year of the picture but he died in the early 60s. After his wife died my Father bought it from the estate around 1965. Unfortunately it was just a used car in very good condition, low millage and it was our second car for many years. I put a lot of miles on it when I was in high school and college.

 

I have been scanning my Dad's old slides so I may post a few more when I get a chance.

 

 

1954-Studebaker.jpeg

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Your great uncle Charles May must have been doing well, he didn't just have any '54 Commander, his was the Land Cruiser.   Those were the top-of-the-line sedan on the longer 120.5" wb, easy to tell because they're the only model with vent windows in the rear doors.   Snazzy, two-tone red and white, white-wall tires.    A '51 Studebaker behind it, was yours a Studebaker family?

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10 hours ago, Walt G said:

one more once to start the day off . thanks so much to everyone who has contributed to this post both in images and in information. GREAT, share the joy.

BodyTypes(3)TOURING CAR1925Diana touringcar005.jpg

BodyTypes(4) ROADSTER-1930 WIndsor - model WhitePrince ROADSTER008.jpg

Quite a pretentious outfit that Moon Motor Company, first with its Rolls-Royce-style radiator, then the Diana imitating the Belgian Minerva and finally the Windsor White Prince styled by Hibbard and Darrin if I'm recalling correctly.     It might just be an assembled car but it didn't have to look like one.   The Windsor really is quite the handsome car, a roadster appeared at Hershey years ago.

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PART 1: L'Automobile et le Tourisme: I've really enjoyed this nice distraction from the all the ....... I read with interest Bob's (1937hd45) posting on pg 3 of his recently purchased magazins (french) L'Illustration, L'Automobile et le Tourisme published Dec 1934. When travelling thru our Capital city (Ottawa, Canada) many years ago I walked into an old curiosity shop (sold books and maps)and asked if they had any Automotive stuff. He went into a back room and pulled out this copy of "L'Illustration, L'Automobile et Le Tourisme" dated October 4th 1930, 4 years earlier than Bob's. While written in french, my limited french teaching in High School (Canada is a Bi-Lingual country) allowed me to sorta translate much of it. I will post 6 or 7 postings. The first here shows items from the first half which is largely fine descriptions and pictures of France and details the great things there are to see while touring the French countryside and urban areas in your new touring car. Many of the photos are printed on the page, but some are printed separately and glued to the page on one edge only for easy removal I suppose. included in this first 4 is a map advising the tourists where to find good food and wine. Those french know how to live!

 

The back half of the magazin is devoted to the latest in Automotive developments and products, and finally 3-4 pages of advertising. Among the Automotive developments are pics of the Cord, V-16 Cadillac Engine, and various new "inventions".

IMG_6159.JPG

IMG_6162.JPG

IMG_6163.JPG

IMG_6165.JPG

Edited by Gunsmoke (see edit history)
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PART 2: L'Automobile et le Tourisme: Oct 4 1930  Edinmass and some others might be interested in knowing the the French publishers were quick on their feet, including a photo of this nice Cord (photo likely taken spring 1930?), a good photo of the then new V-16 Cadillac engine, and an item on using a Zenith Carb on a Talbot engine.  Pretty early photos of all these new things.

Cord photo, L'Automobile Oct 1930 (2).jpeg

V-16 Cadillac Engine Oct 1930 (2).jpeg

Zenith Carb on Talbot Oct 1930 (2).jpeg

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PART 3: L'Automobile et le Tourisme: Oct 04 1930;  I've never seen one of these, not sure if any were built. Illustration of a Raincey circa 1899, the whole drive-train turns with the front steering, maybe an early similarity to the Selden Patent but a bit more sophisticated looking.

Voitture Riancey 1899 (2).jpeg

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15 minutes ago, Walt G said:

Great stuff gentlemen, and all about cars too! nice to see we are back on topic , thanks.

Walt


Walt, I’m from Massachusetts...........so I’m no gentleman.

 

 

7FE5AED0-8FE2-4209-B3A9-47C201BFC2DD.png

723CF613-0D2F-4A17-8F0C-DCD8CD30823B.png

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PART 4 (Continued): L'Automobile et le Tourisme: last posting of 4 parts,  I promise.

 

The centerfold of the magazine had this wonderful 2 page spread on the "nomenclature" of car styles,  in French (23 different models), English (20 different models) and American (10 different models). Under the "you learn something new everyday" slogan, note that only American style terms used Roadster, Coach and Sedan but list does not mention Tourer or Touring. The French use of Conduite (means "'Driving" rather than Chauffeured?), Berline and Torpedo as well as Limousine is interesting. And of course the British used their own terms as well, Saloon, Landaulet, Clover Leaf, and Brougham. The only common styles appear to have been various versions of Coupe, Cabriolet and Landau, all of which are French words. There will be a test in a few weeks, so study up!

Nomenclature 1 Oct 1930 (2).jpeg

Nomenclature 2 Ocy 1930 (2).jpeg

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OK Ed, so you say you are no gentleman but you do like pre war cars , especially the big iron like I do and you also like Scottie dogs - that is another thing we both have in common , so for now you are "alright" until Al and Bob and perhaps a few others tell us different! 😲

WEG

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This is a photo I love for a number of different reasons.  It appeared online only a couple of years ago and since it can't be found all over the place it made me think it was scanned in rather recently.  I tried to backtrack to find the origin but by the time I got to the third person back he had no further information and the trail went cold. 

 

I have been unable to determine what that is bolted to the front wheel.  Everything has been guessed, but if someone truly knows I'd love to hear it.  These cars had some limo-specific hardware but that thing doesn't show up in the parts books nor do either of mine have it.  Given the clothing fashions and the condition of the car, the photo seems to have been taken when it was fairly new.  Not a cheap car and it's interesting to think it was being worked on at home if that's the first owner.

 

1794471149_60HETownCarera(1).thumb.jpg.035676afcd7bfce57bc0e85d68cf4bdc.jpg  

Edited by W_Higgins (see edit history)
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10 minutes ago, W_Higgins said:

This is a photo I love for a number of different reasons.  It appeared online only a couple of years ago and since it can't be found all over the place it made me think it was scanned in rather recently.  I tried to backtrack to find the origin but by the time I got to the third person back he had no further information and the trail went cold. 

 

I have been unable to determine what that is bolted to the front wheel.  Everything has been guessed, but if someone truly knows I'd love to hear it.  These cars had some limo-specific hardware but that thing doesn't show up in the parts books nor do either of mine have it.  Given the clothing fashions and the condition of the car, the photo seems to have been taken when it was fairly new.  Not a cheap car and it's interesting to think it was being worked on at home if that's the first owner.

 

1794471149_60HETownCarera(1).thumb.jpg.035676afcd7bfce57bc0e85d68cf4bdc.jpg  

 

I think even in the '50s, if you had a limousine, you had a "man" who managed it for you, including routine service work. I don't have any guesses for the two things on the front wheel that others didn't guess--radio interference suppressos or balancing weights, but neither seems very likely. Could they be locks for the lug nuts to prevent wheel theft?

 

 

Edited by Matt Harwood (see edit history)
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39 minutes ago, Matt Harwood said:

 

I think even in the '50s, if you had a limousine, you had a "man" who managed it for you, including routine service work. I don't have any guesses for the two things on the front wheel that others didn't guess--radio interference suppressos or balancing weights, but neither seems very likely. Could they be locks for the lug nuts to prevent wheel theft?

 

 

 

That's an interesting thought but in this case this particular model is a Town Car (in '59 they called it a Formal Sedan).  Same general conversion and very similar to the Limo but without the divider window and intended to be driven by the owner.  I did make reference to it being the same as mine, which are both Limos, and should have been more clear.  My guess was it's the owner behind the wheel with his mother and wife, but again, all a guess since I can't trace the origin.    

 

Radio interference suppressor is one I've not heard, but Lincolns of that era wouldn't have had need for such an add-on.  As to wheel locks, those wheels pretty much only fit those cars, but I guess it's possible.  It's too grainy to see well.  Another reason I wanted to find who scanned it in to see if I could get a better copy.    

Edited by W_Higgins (see edit history)
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On 3/16/2020 at 9:21 AM, Walt G said:

Thanks Bob, as I stated earlier can we please post photos etc of things with wheels not legs and paws?  I love animals, but there is a time and place for everything , no?

By the way the last two photos I posted are of a 1926 Diana touring and a 1930 Windsor White Prince roadster.

But, but, I like cat photos

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PART 5: L'Automobile et le Tourisme: Oct 4 1930:

The Oct 4 1930 magazine also had some nicely detailed illustrations of then currently developing technology. The Renault 8 cyl engine views are very similar to early 8 cyl layouts of major American companies. The Tracta "front wheel drive" was a limited success, with the FWD later being more successful with the Citroen Traction Avant venture (1934-1958). Developed at about the same time as the L29 Cord, unique CV joints, inboard brakes, suspension system etc (I include a photo of this engine trans setup in next Part 6).  Finally the Marelli System for providing an early "Power Brakes" options  using a servo-assist bellows arrangement. Others may know if these ideas caught on or were precursors to later developments.

 

 

8 cyl Renault Oct 1930 (2).jpeg

Tracta drivetrain Oct 1930 (2).jpeg

Marelli System Oct 1930 (2).jpeg

Edited by Gunsmoke
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PART 6: L'Automobile et le Tourisme: Oct 4 1930

I previously showed an illustration of the FWD of the French Tracta (not to be confused with Traction Avant), here is photo of the under-hood area and a rolling chassis, allowing for lower overall stance. Of course you could not drive one without a Driver's License, note this one from 1928 includes a photo, I never realized any country had such features so early on. Here in Canada, photo licenses I think began about mid 1970's. My final segment to follow will include some very early accessories.

Tracta from Oct 1930 (2).jpeg

France, Driver's License 1928.jpeg

Edited by Gunsmoke
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PART 7: L'Automobile et le Tourisme: Oct 4 1930

Finally from this great old magazine, some accessories we all take for granted now. How about signal lights, article refers to these devices becoming a requirement in Germany.  Or how about an electronic "vacuum assisted-Cigarette Dispenser", gee now-a-days you don't even get a cigarette lighter. And at last a neat idea used by Panhard for storing basic tools under the hood. Not sure this ever caught on, but many times when I pop the hood on my new cars I wish I had a small box of basic tools, a roll of paper to wipe dipstick, a small funnel for fluids etc. Seems like something easy to do! Maybe I should suggest the idea to "Weathertech" folks! 

Early Signal Lights.jpeg

Cigarette Dispenser.jpeg

Underhood tool storage.jpeg

Edited by Gunsmoke
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4 hours ago, W_Higgins said:

 

That's an interesting thought but in this case this particular model is a Town Car (in '59 they called it a Formal Sedan).  Same general conversion and very similar to the Limo but without the divider window and intended to be driven by the owner.  I did make reference to it being the same as mine, which are both Limos, and should have been more clear.  My guess was it's the owner behind the wheel with his mother and wife, but again, all a guess since I can't trace the origin.    

 

Radio interference suppressor is one I've not heard, but Lincolns of that era wouldn't have had need for such an add-on.  As to wheel locks, those wheels pretty much only fit those cars, but I guess it's possible.  It's too grainy to see well.  Another reason I wanted to find who scanned it in to see if I could get a better copy.    

I believe it was a Hess & Eisenhardt conversion.

 

Craig

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  • Steve Moskowitz changed the title to Period Images to Relieve some of the Stresshttps://forums.aaca.org/topic/341211-period-images-to-relieve-some-of-the-stress/
  • gwells changed the title to Period images to relieve some of the stress

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