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Period images to relieve some of the stress


Walt G

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20 hours ago, LCK81403 said:

Howard, it does appear that you are correct.  The rumble lid does look like it is short and the windscreen could be on a hinge and mate with the lid in collapsed configuration.  Hmmm, kind of wonder if it rattled?

 

Hopefully someone might know where this car is today, and have the opportunity to have a look at its deck lid. You can just see the handle in the 1980 photo and it is not easy to be sure just where it is in relation to the lid.

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On 7/27/2021 at 10:50 AM, LCK81403 said:

Regarding the 1929 Chrysler roadster.  Is it fitted was a version of a second windshield similar to what is found on a dual-cowl?  This photo is the only instance that I have seen of what appears to be a windshield / windscreen for occupants of a rumble seat.  How and where is it stored, how is it supported; support arms of any sort are not observable in the photo.

 

Several comments have been made about the various paint schemes on this vehicle.  Agreed, so what color/colors of paint would look good?  What about the wide-white wall tires?  Regardless of the paint the wide-whites seem to overpower the visual presentation of the car overall.  The first thing I see is the white-whites, then I need to ignore the tires and view the car and that is wrong.  It does seem that plain black wall tires are more complementary for this car.

29 Chrysler.jpg

29 Chrysler - Copy.jpg

The more I thought about this the more I knew I had seen something very similar before.  Found this 1947 Triumph this morning.

Howard Dennisuyuygy.JPG.0b7412552d5bb072ec1a61b94009464c.JPG

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On 7/28/2021 at 12:03 PM, hddennis said:

The more I thought about this the more I knew I had seen something very similar before.  Found this 1947 Triumph this morning.

Howard Dennisuyuygy.JPG.0b7412552d5bb072ec1a61b94009464c.JPG

Ran across this discussion that had this picture. Wonder if Locke put the twin panes in the lid or was it owner modified? This picture shows why it was split panes.   https://forums.aaca.org/topic/291250-how-to-get-in-rumble-seat/

 

Howard Dennis58e974fe30cbf_1930ChryslerLocke.jpg.01bfdfecc60dab02500c9138070ade6e.jpg.cb17de9f9fe7d9c646b689c0d3882bb5.jpg

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On 7/29/2021 at 12:12 AM, nzcarnerd said:

 

Hopefully someone might know where this car is today, and have the opportunity to have a look at its deck lid. You can just see the handle in the 1980 photo and it is not easy to be sure just where it is in relation to the lid.

Hello All I have just been visiting  the site and picked up on the 1929 Chrysler imperial Thread ..This is most interesting as I owned this car from 1977 and I have to admit I was the kiwi who re restored the roadster and chose the Whitewalls and colour scheme which is seen in the 1980 pix, i was very proud of the car then despite some comments as when i purchased her  the lovely body swages were not accentuated  to any real.,effect etc I also was most nostalgic when I saw the the early pix in the 1960,s when the car was painted Maroon as this was the guise I first sited the car in when I was going to High school and lusted after the care ever since not ever thinking that would own it someday. The earlier black and White  pix I had never seen before so thank you to those who posted these . 

when I purchased this car it was the same price as my new house at the time about $17000 as I recall and the car had implement ( harvester) tyres fitted so the New Denmans were a big purchase for me also at the time in old NZ !!

the rear rumble seat lid comprised of a larger main panel and a smaller upper panel which had the original glass inserts fitted to suggest a type of windscreen very similar as suggested to the 1947 Truimph Roadster  .the upper section had adjustable side stays to allow a suitable rake on the front screen when raised , it didnt rattle and had drain channels around the side  the handle was on the larger rumble seat panel which would need to be lifted first as they locked together at the join .

I was never able to find out how this car right hand drive as it was came to be in NZ as there were very few made in this version but the consistent rumour was that the Chrysler had had over 40 owners before myself .

it was resold twice after myself in NZ and i believe it now resides in UK ,

Since reading  this I am going to reach out to last NZ owner whom I still am  able contact and perhaps provide more history , alternativley if the current owner was to read this I would be keen to send images etc of my time with this special car .

This is a great forum and i thank those who have brought this to my notice 

 

Kind Regards Alan Sutton

 

 

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Note that the spotlight on the windshield frame has the same style rim as the headlamps. By 1920 Packard issued an annual multi page b & w sales catalog illustrating accessories that were on offer for purchase by the Packard factory. PMCC did not make all the accessories themselves but their  team would look at what was being produced and then if deemed worthy they would offer them as official factory equipment.  I have collected a small pile/stack  of factory accessory catalogs from about 1920 to 1941 and it is amazing what could have been purchased and added to the original price of the car. You could have bought a brand new Chevy, Plymouth, or Ford for the cost of a pile of accessories on your Packard.  Add in the general non official accessory supply catalogs , flyers, etc and this would be a multi page article.

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Thanks John, that really clears things up although I have to take exception with the books assumption that the purpose of the glass is unknown. The picture tells it all, there could be no other purpose.

 

Howard Dennis

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9 hours ago, alsancle said:

1920 Twin Six with artillery wheels.

 

 

1920TwinSixPackard.jpg

 

To me 'artillery wheels' are spoked, usually but not always wooden. 

 

These looks like Disteel disc wheels.

 

That fender mirror looks to be in such a place that the only thing you will see in it is the spotlight - 😉

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The thermal region of New Zealand's central North Island has been a tourist destination since the middle of the 19th century. Here is a 1906 postcard. I doubt the car is identifiable but I have an idea I have seen another photo of what might be the same vehicle somewhere. I just have to find it.

 

 

NZ cars waiotapu 06 Lew Redwood.jpg

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This photo was posted on a facebook page by Heather Shoal. In the main group photo are her grandparents holding their children.

 

She asks what is the big car?

 

My first thought was circa 1917 Buick wearing a 'Detroit Weatherproof' top. There is a photo of a very similar car in the book 70 Years of Buick.

 

BUT - I think it might actually be a Studebaker. Radiator shape - rear hubs - etc.

 

I think the other car is a Ford.

 

Found this regarding Detroit Weatherproof. - Detroit Weatherproof Body Co., Weatherproof Body Corp., Model T Truck Body, Ford Cab, All-weather truck cab, Corunna Michigan, Owosso Michigan - CoachBuilt.com

 

May be an image of 1 person and standing

 

May be an image of one or more people, people standing and outdoors

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2 hours ago, nzcarnerd said:

This photo was posted on a facebook page by Heather Shoal. In the main group photo are her grandparents holding their children.

 

She asks what is the big car?

 

My first thought was circa 1917 Buick wearing a 'Detroit Weatherproof' top. There is a photo of a very similar car in the book 70 Years of Buick.

 

BUT - I think it might actually be a Studebaker. Radiator shape - rear hubs - etc.

 

I think the other car is a Ford.

 

Found this regarding Detroit Weatherproof. - Detroit Weatherproof Body Co., Weatherproof Body Corp., Model T Truck Body, Ford Cab, All-weather truck cab, Corunna Michigan, Owosso Michigan - CoachBuilt.com

 

May be an image of 1 person and standing

 

May be an image of one or more people, people standing and outdoors

 

I am going to say that neither is a Model T.

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On 7/30/2021 at 7:18 AM, Walt G said:

Note that the spotlight on the windshield frame has the same style rim as the headlamps. By 1920 Packard issued an annual multi page b & w sales catalog illustrating accessories that were on offer for purchase by the Packard factory. PMCC did not make all the accessories themselves but their  team would look at what was being produced and then if deemed worthy they would offer them as official factory equipment.  I have collected a small pile/stack  of factory accessory catalogs from about 1920 to 1941 and it is amazing what could have been purchased and added to the original price of the car. You could have bought a brand new Chevy, Plymouth, or Ford for the cost of a pile of accessories on your Packard.  Add in the general non official accessory supply catalogs , flyers, etc and this would be a multi page article.

That is interesting about Packard.  Studebaker didn't start offering factory accessories until the 1931 model year, according to Richard Quinn:  Can anyone shed some light on this item? - Studebaker Drivers Club Forum

 

Correct that factory engineers would evaluate each potential accessory, and if worthy, inside purchasing and sales would get involved to assess its marketing viability.  I would imagine most Packard accessories would have a 'Packard' label on it somewhere.

 

Craig

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The folklore was you could balance a nickel on the hood ornament of a running Marmon Sixteen - but this earlier balancing effort seems a little more spectacular! MarmonHoodOrnament1926_000035.jpg.97dd8f2409c3cbc2330f16aad589f512.jpg

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10 hours ago, twin6 said:

Several Locomobile steamers?

 

I was wondering that myself. There were a number of imitators of the Stanley/Locomobile design, with subtle differences. So it can be hard to tell. I really like the car behind the Orient Auto-go Fore car, the one half in the building. I don't know what it is either.

Wonderful photo!

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14 hours ago, wayne sheldon said:

 

I was wondering that myself. There were a number of imitators of the Stanley/Locomobile design, with subtle differences. So it can be hard to tell. I really like the car behind the Orient Auto-go Fore car, the one half in the building. I don't know what it is either.

Wonderful photo!

I think the car at the far end of those outside is the same as the one in the doorway as well.

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Another early mystery vehicle posted on a facebook page.

 

The truck could be from anywhere - USA, Britain or Europe. Hard to say.

 

"Braidwood Brass Band, on Garnet Madrell's truck, 1914.   Braidwood is a town in the Southern Tablelands of New South Wales, Australia, in Queanbeyan–Palerang Regional Council. It is located on the Kings Highway linking Canberra with Batemans Bay. It is approximately 200 kilometres south west of Sydney, 60 kilometres inland from the coast, and fifty-five from Canberra."

 

 

java stephens hands from peter Latts.jpg

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auburn.jpg

 

 In 1935, The Auburn Auto painted four of their cars white and toured them around the country, promoting the company. These  dapper young men have stopped at Landy's Clothing store on Main St. in Auburn, Indiana to get outfitted for the tour and are posing with one of the cars.  Sadly the company was struggling and closed two years later.
 

Edited by plymouthcranbrook (see edit history)
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The first of these photos, taken in Courtney Place, Wellington, New Zealand about 1939 turned up on a facebook page. It was printed in the local paper The Dominion in 2011 in black and white and the poster colourised it.

 

The second photo appeared around the same time and I realised that the two were taken only a very short time apart. The photographer was obviously standing on a shop verandah and followed the progress of the mystery European sedan - which so far has eluded being identified.

 

 

Old Wgtn Sean Drader colourised photo Courtney Pl Wgtn.jpg

Courtenay Place, Wellington, ca. 1939.jpg

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