Jump to content

Period images to relieve some of the stress


Walt G

Recommended Posts

This photo is labeled 1907 American; not sure where it came from.  It possibly was posted on this site hundreds of pages ago.  My photo files have twenty brands of cars with American in the name but none of them look like the car in this photo.  The car fits the description of being a high wheeler but that is no help to identify the builder.

1907 American.jpg

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I have had no timeto be on here but could not resist this gem uncover from the Philadelphia Library goodies now owned by  us.  This picture was filthy and is very, very cool although the caption says cycle car race in 1911 and most of the cars do not seem to fit a typical cycle car to me.  Picture is waaaaay cool though.  Swanson, I bet you are drooling!

1914 race.jpg

  • Like 4
Link to comment
Share on other sites

49 minutes ago, 58L-Y8 said:

Here's a better look:

 

The date reads "July 4-5, 1914

1911 Cycle-Car race.jpg

 

#5 on the right might be the Marr cyclecar. 

 

The two cars with exposed engines next to the Marr might have Spacke V twin engines in them. I have seen mention of them elsewhere but don't know much about them.

 

The next one - on our left of the exposed engine cars looks as if it might be a Peugeot Bebe.

 

To the left of that one maybe a McIntyre?

 

Next left from that looks to be more a Ford T size car, though it has conventional front suspension.

 

The car two to the right of the Coey looks to be an early Morgan - by the sliding pillar front suspension.

 

The car between that and the Coey kind of looks like a miniature Stutz Bearcat and I am sure someone will recognise it.

  • Like 3
Link to comment
Share on other sites

12 hours ago, nzcarnerd said:

The car between that and the Coey kind of looks like a miniature Stutz Bearcat and I am sure someone will recognise it.

 

It is a Metz! It appears to have wire wheels, which were an option on Metz for many of their years. One specific model, in 1914, the wire wheels were the standard feature. That particular car was called "Speedster" by Metz factory and advertising. And the car in this photo very much looks like the 1914 Metz Speedster, a standard factory offered car.

The engine is similar to a model T Ford, same bore and stroke, slightly higher compression. The rest of the car is slightly smaller than a model T.

Metz was not generally considered a cyclecar, however, I have seen them included on a couple cyclecar lists.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Here's a 1930 Buick loading on a railcar. Check out the outfits on the two ladies, and think about how much easier it is to ship a car cross country now!

1930BuickonTrain_000028.jpg

  • Like 3
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Interesting to see a motor car being loaded into a train car via a rear door. Most cars transported by train were loaded from platforms and came in and out via a side door. This was the way the majority of cars produced in large quantities arrived in cities that were distant from the automobile factory. Cars were strapped ( chained?) down to the railroad car floor so not to bounce around and shift weight and thus destroy or damage fenders, bumpers etc. Most of the new cars arriving in NY City came in by freight /box cars on trains arriving on the west side of Manhattan in the active rail yards that once stood there.

There were well publicized massive "drive-aways" from factories to cities for delivery that were perhaps up to 150 mile radius of the factory location. I have photographs of Chevrolet and Franklins at mass drive-aways pre WWII.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Info on the cars in the "First Annual International Cycle Car race" I posted above.  The cars are supposed to be:3 Twomblys, 2 Saginaws, 2 Vixens, Princess, Coey, Detroit, Morgan, Downing, Bebe Puegeot, Mercury, Malcolm, and Zip.  I am amazed at all you super astute guys that you did not at least instantly recognize the Malcolm! :) 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

9 hours ago, HK500 said:

Here's a 1930 Buick loading on a railcar. Check out the outfits on the two ladies, and think about how much easier it is to ship a car cross country now!

1930BuickonTrain_000028.jpg

 

That 1930 Buick is a 1929 model. I think it is a Series 121 Model 47.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

The Ira Vail driven 1919 HUDSON Indy 500 car being loaded for a race somewhere. He later sold it to H.D. Carpenter of Philadelphia, that may be him along side the car in the third photo. The car was found on a used car lot in 1948. Cameron Peck bought it, it was later in the Lindley Bothwell collection, then Bill Harrah had it. Tom Barrett restored it and it is now in South Korea in the Samsung collection. Sure would be nice to see it come home.

 

Bob 

1917-HUDSON-racer-arcd06921-Philly-Free-Library-sm.jpg

OIP (1).jpg

OIP (2).jpg

OIP.jpg

Edited by 1937hd45 (see edit history)
  • Like 6
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Great photo, thank you for post it.  I focused on the car's wheel.  It does not appear to be a wooden wheel, IMHO.  Do you happened to know if it is a wheel made from two pressed steel spoke patterns, welded together to resemble a wooden wheel?

Alvis automobile 01-02.jpg

Alvis automobile  02-02 wheel.jpg

Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 hour ago, LCK81403 said:

Great photo, thank you for post it.  I focused on the car's wheel.  It does not appear to be a wooden wheel, IMHO.  Do you happened to know if it is a wheel made from two pressed steel spoke patterns, welded together to resemble a wooden wheel?

Alvis automobile 01-02.jpg

Alvis automobile  02-02 wheel.jpg

Those are Sankey pressed steel wheels.  Very common on British cars at that time.

  • Like 3
Link to comment
Share on other sites

19 hours ago, nzcarnerd said:

I should recognise the one. I think we have seen something similar here recently, but it hasn't come to me yet.

 

Photo supposedly Michigan 1914.

 

May be an image of outdoors

 

 

Not for certain. But it looks a lot like a Scripps-Booth that collector Harvey Harper had in Eureka California about fifteen years ago. His I think was a small touring type body style whereas this looks like a roadster. The radiator and gasoline fill in the cowl look about the same. Also the wire wheels. Scripps-Booth had an interesting history. Born to some wealth, his automotive endeavors were not generally profitable, however he built several really interesting and even unique vehicles. They ranged from small to large, and even bizarre. One series of automobiles had one of the smallest V-8s of the 1910s. His automotive companies were eventually sold to General Motors (if I recall correctly?) and after only a couple more years the facilities were rolled into other GM marques. (All off the top of my head?)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

3 hours ago, wayne sheldon said:

 

 

Not for certain. But it looks a lot like a Scripps-Booth that collector Harvey Harper had in Eureka California about fifteen years ago. His I think was a small touring type body style whereas this looks like a roadster. The radiator and gasoline fill in the cowl look about the same. Also the wire wheels. Scripps-Booth had an interesting history. Born to some wealth, his automotive endeavors were not generally profitable, however he built several really interesting and even unique vehicles. They ranged from small to large, and even bizarre. One series of automobiles had one of the smallest V-8s of the 1910s. His automotive companies were eventually sold to General Motors (if I recall correctly?) and after only a couple more years the facilities were rolled into other GM marques. (All off the top of my head?)

 

There was a suggestion on the facebook page the photo came form that it might be a Car-Nation.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

13 hours ago, dictator27 said:

Those are Sankey pressed steel wheels.  Very common on British cars at that time.

 

And apparently the car is a Jowett. I did think it a little small to be an Alvis.

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 hour ago, nzcarnerd said:

 

And apparently the car is a Jowett. I did think it a little small to be an Alvis.

 

That's it!  I had been thinking Clyno.  Considering that Jowetts of the day had a horizontally opposed 2 cylinder engine, there is a lot of empty space under that high engine hood.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

On 7/11/2021 at 7:41 PM, K8096 said:

A happy owner with his new 1929 Stutz in San Francisco 

 

 

Stutzsedan-1200_1621.jpg

Wow - the same architect must have designed the Pierce-Arrow building (shown here under construction circa 1914) in San Francisco (still can read the "Pierce-Arrow" chiseled in the masonry at the top):

 

IMG_3082.jpeg

  • Like 3
Link to comment
Share on other sites

On 3/16/2020 at 6:40 PM, Gunsmoke said:

PART 3: L'Automobile et le Tourisme: Oct 04 1930;  I've never seen one of these, not sure if any were built. Illustration of a Raincey circa 1899, the whole drive-train turns with the front steering, maybe an early similarity to the Selden Patent but a bit more sophisticated looking.

Voitture Riancey 1899 (2).jpeg

A great illustration of a de Riancey voiturette but the Selden car should be taken for what it became, a fraud on the American public. In 1899 no one in France had heard of the Selden vehicle or the Selden Patent. After all, it was not until 1899 that efforts to collect patent fees from US automakers were made. Since no Selden vehicle had been  made at that point, the whole idea was just a drawing on an unfinished patent. The actual vehicle was cobbled together after 1900 using little of Selden's powerplant. 

On the other hand, the de Riancey vehicle decends from the French and German avant moteur. It was the intention of some early European engine makers to replace all of the horse-related towing gear with an axle-engine combination; that way the consumer would not have to replace the entire wagon. The idea never really caught on as the money-saving device it might have been. 

In retrospect, this proves that the requirements of the horse-drawn wagon and the requirements of the automobile are vastly different. The avant moteur was seen on some US early trucks, the Barrows cars and the early US urban taxis. Personally, I like the 1895 Barrows, the motor and batteries hang out front, so heavy that it probably had to be steered by the rear wheels.

barrows.jpg

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

And an early straight 8 Packard Phaeton - looks like with some sort of tonneau windshield in the back - up on the Richfield gas station lift, Los Angeles,  sometime in the 20's.

20sPackardRichfieldLift_000030.jpg

  • Like 5
Link to comment
Share on other sites

16 hours ago, nzcarnerd said:

From the AACA facebook page. Posted by Bob Westiniky. His dad behind the wheel and his uncle holding the rear door. 

 

The car - a 1931 Chrysler??

 

May be an image of one or more people, people standing and outdoors

 

 

1931 or 1932 Chrysler.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

2 hours ago, HK500 said:

And an early straight 8 Packard Phaeton - looks like with some sort of tonneau windshield in the back - up on the Richfield gas station lift, Los Angeles,  sometime in the 20's.

20sPackardRichfieldLift_000030.jpg

Sport model, 2nd series, cool!

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Another one from facebook. Rhyolite, Nevada, August 1907.

 

From left to right - maybe - White steamer, Locomobile, Pope-Hartford??

 

An EDIT to this one - Seems the from left to right it is circa 1906 Thomas, circa 1906-07 Apperson and circa 1906 Pope-Toledo. And another Apperson in the background.

 

May be an image of standing and outdoors

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Five photos of a 1929 Chrysler Imperial Locke body roadster from the early 1960s, through several owners,  to the last one, a photo I took at the International vintage car rally in Rotorua New Zealand in 1980.

 

The car's history prior to the 1950s is unknown.

 

I believe the car has gone overseas but its whereabouts is unknown.

 

1961

1 61 c NZ Imperial f S Sharp ownership - Copy.jpg

2 61 c NZ Imperial r S Sharp ownership - Copy.jpg

3 Shack Sharpe ownership early 60s - Copy.jpg

 

late 1960s

4 Chas Emerson ownership late 60s Ingl - Copy.jpg

 

1980.

5 my photo Rotorua 80 - Copy.jpg

  • Like 3
Link to comment
Share on other sites

19 hours ago, nzcarnerd said:

Another one from facebook. Rhyolite, Nevada, August 1907.

 

From left to right - maybe - White steamer, Locomobile, Pope-Hartford??

 

Far left looks like an early Thomas.

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

On 7/25/2021 at 9:41 PM, nzcarnerd said:

Five photos of a 1929 Chrysler Imperial Locke body roadster from the early 1960s, through several owners,  to the last one, a photo I took at the International vintage car rally in Rotorua New Zealand in 1980.

 

The car's history prior to the 1950s is unknown.

 

I believe the car has gone overseas but its whereabouts is unknown.

 

1961

1 61 c NZ Imperial f S Sharp ownership - Copy.jpg

2 61 c NZ Imperial r S Sharp ownership - Copy.jpg

3 Shack Sharpe ownership early 60s - Copy.jpg

 

late 1960s

4 Chas Emerson ownership late 60s Ingl - Copy.jpg

 

1980.

5 my photo Rotorua 80 - Copy.jpg

Oddly enough,  every time someone decided to "improve " the paint the look of the car suffered. In this case the car deteriorated in appearance from a real class act to downright tacky. What a difference paint can make. 

  • Like 2
  • Thanks 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Regarding the 1929 Chrysler roadster.  Is it fitted was a version of a second windshield similar to what is found on a dual-cowl?  This photo is the only instance that I have seen of what appears to be a windshield / windscreen for occupants of a rumble seat.  How and where is it stored, how is it supported; support arms of any sort are not observable in the photo.

 

Several comments have been made about the various paint schemes on this vehicle.  Agreed, so what color/colors of paint would look good?  What about the wide-white wall tires?  Regardless of the paint the wide-whites seem to overpower the visual presentation of the car overall.  The first thing I see is the white-whites, then I need to ignore the tires and view the car and that is wrong.  It does seem that plain black wall tires are more complementary for this car.

29 Chrysler.jpg

29 Chrysler - Copy.jpg

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I could be wrong as I too have never seen this windshield variation. To my eye it appears that the rumble lid is short and when closed only extends to the door jam of the right door. The windshield looks like it would fold down and close the space from the door jam forward.

 

Howard Dennis

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Howard, it does appear that you are correct.  The rumble lid does look like it is short and the windscreen could be on a hinge and mate with the lid in collapsed configuration.  Hmmm, kind of wonder if it rattled?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Here is an article in Popular Science Monthly, May, 1938, page 34.

 

"Rubber Spokes Give Bounce to Airless Safety Tires

 

Hard wood, embedded in rubber, forms the rim of a new safety tire invented by J. V. Martin of Garden City, N. Y.  Said to be more resilient and lighter than pneumatic types, the safety tire has hoops of hickory incased in rubber and fitted with criss-cross spokes of ribbed rubber.  Puncture proof and blowout-proof, the airless tires absorbed practically all vertical movement when a springless test car drove over four-inch blocks strung along a concrete road in a recent trial, it is claimed."

 

The airless tire of 1938, shown in the magazine photograph, appears to be a finished product at that point in time.  Having been associated with Research, Development, Testing and Evaulation (RDT&E) for many years I know that a finished and marketable product had a number of R-D-and T versions and underwent a number of evaluation tests (and failures) before reaching the market.  Some good inventions are too ahead of their time and are not marketable.  In the case of the airless tire produced by Mr. Martin, it has been involved in renewed testing of materials and markets into the 2000s.

 

Although no documentation has yet been found regarding airless tire prototypes and testing prior to 1938, a photo of such a tire hull or husk was presented earlier in this forum.  A photo of that particular tire clearly shows an interwoven husk of what appears to be metal hoops underlying a heavy rubber tread that is fitted over a standard rubber tire.  The underlying rubber tire may or may not be inflated, but regardless of inflation the pneumatic tire hull is supported by the interlocked wire hoops.  The wire hoops appear to interlock much like middle-ages chainmail armor.

 

A number of tire manufacturers today continue to work with the airless tire technology, including Michelin, Bridgestone, Goodyear and others.  Modern rubber compounds, chemistry, synthetic materials and fibers greatly improve on the 1930s "hickory hoops" of wood encased in rubber.  Airless tires are produced for automobiles, all terrain/utility vehicles, and heavy earth moving vehicles.  Because of a significant savings in weight of airless over pneumatic tires, perhaps one day airless aircraft tires may reduce the dead weight of commercial and military aircraft.

 

 

 

DSC01853.JPG

DSC01854.JPG

Airless 1243189516_Only8lugs.jpg.1f5a147cdf34d98daa518f81f0bad79a - Copy.jpg

Michelin airless 001.jpg

Polaris airless.jpg

Michelin airless 004.jpg

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
×
×
  • Create New...