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Period images to relieve some of the stress


Walt G

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3 hours ago, nzcarnerd said:

I note in the post above re Rapid trucks, the trucks in the second photo - presumable the new four cylinder model - has Northway Motor & Mnf. Company on the side. This would have been about the time that Billy Durant acquired both Rapid and Northway for GM. I see a mixed load on the truck, including tomato soup. There is a box marked ARGO amongst it. I wonder if it had anything to do with ARGO electric cars.

 

 

78064936_10Rapidtruck.jpg.daeb758a14affd85ed782db6dab7343c.jpg

Looks like load is food products. ARGO is corn starch.

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An article in "The Automobile", October 13, 1910, page 624 carried information about a two-cycle "wobble-gear" engine.  The article cited a previous article about it in the "Automotor Journal".  Did a wobble-gear engine ever appear in an automobile?

 

In those early days some novel things were tried, such as the three-cylinder and five-cylinder horizontal rotary engines in the Adams-Farwell.  The Adams-Farwell actually attained production status but thus far I have not found any automobile listing a wobble-gear engine.  The third photo shows a 1906 Adams-Farwell Model 6A horizontal rotary engine.  This type/configuration rotary engine was used in World War One fighter airplanes.  The shaft is stationary and the bank of cylinders revolve around to provide power; and a dangerous amount of torque that could be lethal to pilots.

10 Wobble-gear engine.JPG

06 Adams-Farwell ad 01.jpg

06 Adams-Farwell 6A rotary engine.png

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Another interesting period photo posted on facebook.

 

Apparently that is the Kelly family of Rotterdam, New York.

 

The sedan looks to be from the 1917-20 era. Any thought what the make might be?

 

 

old photos Rotterdam NY Kelly family John Johnson post.jpg

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21 hours ago, LCK81403 said:

An article in "The Automobile", October 13, 1910, page 624 carried information about a two-cycle "wobble-gear" engine.  The article cited a previous article about it in the "Automotor Journal".  Did a wobble-gear engine ever appear in an automobile?

 

In those early days some novel things were tried, such as the three-cylinder and five-cylinder horizontal rotary engines in the Adams-Farwell.  The Adams-Farwell actually attained production status but thus far I have not found any automobile listing a wobble-gear engine.  The third photo shows a 1906 Adams-Farwell Model 6A horizontal rotary engine.  This type/configuration rotary engine was used in World War One fighter airplanes.  The shaft is stationary and the bank of cylinders revolve around to provide power; and a dangerous amount of torque that could be lethal to pilots.

10 Wobble-gear engine.JPG

06 Adams-Farwell ad 01.jpg

06 Adams-Farwell 6A rotary engine.png

 

The same basic principal as your wobble engine is sometimes used on hydraulic pumps and motors.

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11 minutes ago, 1912Staver said:

 

The same basic principal as your wobble engine is sometimes used on hydraulic pumps and motors.

As was the A/C compressor used in a number of GM cars around 1979-'80, most notably, the new X-cars that year.  

 

Craig

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On 7/11/2021 at 6:32 PM, nzcarnerd said:

 

Interesting coincidence, this one was posted a short time ago on a facebook page. Not a very clear photo unfortunately.

 

I don't much about Pierce's commercial efforts. This one is dated at 1928 - photo or vehicle? Maybe both.

 

May be an image of one or more people, people standing and outdoors

 

 

From the book, Pierce-Arrow by Marc Ralston, page 205:

 

"The year 1924 saw the introduction of the new Z chassis that utilized the six-cylinder dual-valve engine of the Series 33 automobile.   This had a 4 inch x 5 1/2 inch bore and stroke and developed 38 horsepower.  It came in two wheelbases, 196-inch and 220-inch.   With is four-speed transmission, it had a top speed of 60 miles per hour.   The price was between $3,300 and $5,200.  Although primarily made for a bus body, this chassis was also used for other commercial vehicles, including a number of fire engines. Scanty information from Pierce-Arrow recension table would indicate that rather few (less than a thousand) Z chassis were assembled between 1924 and 1928. Two presently are known to exist. (1980)."

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On 6/27/2021 at 3:29 PM, Dave Gelinas (XP-300) said:

1929 Cord L-29 Phaeton Prototype

1929 Cord L-29 Phaeton Prototype.jpg

There is some story with this photo as they probably could have gone anywhere but the mudhole they took this car to (my guess is some window from the factory or headquarters). 

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A nice clear photo shared from a facebook page. The owner of the photo looking for id.

 

From Alan young - 

 

"Okay, everyone. Looking for help in identifying this automobile. The picture is an original photo mounted on board, and the license plate on the car is a 1903 Massachusetts. My registration listing books only reference the owner by name and address, no make of automobile.  1903 Massachusetts license plate no. 2177 was registered to Harry C Bachelder, 23 Fourth Ave, Lowell. My 1904 book shows the same registrant with the car being 15 horsepower, but the make is only referenced with a question mark."

 

Not a Winton apparently.

 

May be an image of 2 people, people standing and outdoors

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One for the Packard experts. I guess a post WW2 photo.

 

Odd it only looks to have three vent doors on the hood. Info on the participants on the back of the photo.

 

Is that an early historical plate?

 

 

old photos Packard Bruce Peterson.jpg

old photos Packard Bruce Peterson back.jpg

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3 minutes ago, 1937hd45 said:

May be an image of 2 people, people standing and outdoors

DSC06891-scaled.jpg

 

Looks a lot like this 1903 Pope-Hartford that is or was for sale recently. 

Bob 

 

 

Looks like it lost 2 rows of radiator during restoration.   Hope it doesn't run hot now.   

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While there are a few interesting similarities? There are too many important differences for me to think they would be closely related. A significant difference in the fit of the firewall, and I think the venting(?) on the sides of the front cover (hood?) is different. The shape of the seats is very different, somewhat rounded on the Pope, very straight on the unknown. The suspension is different, full elliptic vs half elliptic. The biggest thing I think are all the controls. The locations of all the levers, the types of all the levers. The radiator mentioned already.

All the differences could be explained by a model or even one year difference between the cars. Maybe. Things were changing so very fast between 1900 and 1905. Most automobile manufacturers were copying others, and designs were changing on some cars almost monthly! A car like the Rambler would have several models being produced at the same time, often many of them not looking anything like the others. Other companies might only build one model at a time, and build only a few of them before some change would be made and the rest would be different. Pope built a lot of cars, under different city names with significant variations and similarities between them. It may be worthwhile to investigate some of Pope's other offerings.

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7 hours ago, nzcarnerd said:

One for the Packard experts. I guess a post WW2 photo.

 

Odd it only looks to have three vent doors on the hood. Info on the participants on the back of the photo.

 

Is that an early historical plate?

 

 

old photos Packard Bruce Peterson.jpg

old photos Packard Bruce Peterson back.jpg

Usually the juniors had louvers in the hood, but I found a few pictures of some 733's that had hoods with 3 doors.  The Seniors had 4 doors on the hood.     John

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7 hours ago, 1937hd45 said:

May be an image of 2 people, people standing and outdoors

DSC06891-scaled.jpg

 

Looks a lot like this 1903 Pope-Hartford that is or was for sale recently. 

Bob 

 

On the facebook page someone said they thought it might be a Pope-Hartford but then realised there were differences.

 

I think out mystery car is bigger and heavier than the red P-H. Note the front suspension for one thing.

 

The original was quoted as being 15 hp.

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16 hours ago, nzcarnerd said:

One for the Packard experts. I guess a post WW2 photo.

 

Odd it only looks to have three vent doors on the hood. Info on the participants on the back of the photo.

 

Is that an early historical plate?

 

 

old photos Packard Bruce Peterson.jpg

old photos Packard Bruce Peterson back.jpg

I think it is a 1930 733 Standard Eight factory bodied dual cowl phaeton.  Three door hoods were a factory accessory for the 726/733 Packards.

 

Capt. Harley😉

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Capt. Harley is totally correct about the 3 door hood being a factory accessory for the 7th series 733 and 726. I own a 733 as you can see from the photo in my ID box, acquired a 3 door hood but then the stock louvered hood grew on me styling wise so although I have the optional hood it shifted to the "gonna happen some day" department.

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19 hours ago, K8096 said:

This has got to be the weirdest Model A I've ever seen.  

 

History-1920-13054.jpg

 

I've seen this photo before, believe it is built on an AA chassis using the fancy wire wheels they used on ambulance, and flower cars. 

 

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9 hours ago, nickelroadster said:

I would not expect his cruising speed while towing to be very fast!

In those days, off roading and camping was about the same thing. What cruising speed? You didn't need speed on dirt roads and woods trails. Now a days we have 4 lane roads right up to our camp site.

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23 hours ago, Walt G said:

Capt. Harley is totally correct about the 3 door hood being a factory accessory for the 7th series 733 and 726. I own a 733 as you can see from the photo in my ID box, acquired a 3 door hood but then the stock louvered hood grew on me styling wise so although I have the optional hood it shifted to the "gonna happen some day" department.

 

On the subject of 733s this one, as far as I know the only one of these sold new in NZ, was restored in the 1960s and still looks as good today as it did then. The owner passed away a few weeks ago at the age of 84.

 

I think he built most of the body from scratch as the car had become a wrecker in its later life. The 733 was later fitted with an 'agricultural' overdrive unit which was quite noisy when engaged but that didn't bother the owner as he was partially deaf.

 

The first photo was taken at a local parade in March 1973, and the other one in January 2020. I drove the car for a magazine article some years ago. My main memory is of the brake pedal going up and down with the front suspension movement. The same owner also restored a third series Twin Six, which was a faster car than the 733, which was quite leisurely.

 

 

73 3 March Vic st cars 16301_large.jpg

30 DH5053 733 TC Little River 010120 Andrew Rusbatch photo fb.jpg

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My 733 is comfortable at 55-60 mph , but most at 50 mph. No issue about the brake pedal jumping about due to the front suspension. The cable brakes work very very well if sorted out and adjusted by someone who knows what they are doing . I had mine sorted by a friend who has a restoration shop in western  Connecticut and wow does it stop well! - that is an understatement .

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2 minutes ago, 28 Chrysler said:

The car in Mt Barker could be a 1929 Dodge.

The 1929 DB would have had 12 spokes per wheel. The car in question only has 10.

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