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Period images to relieve some of the stress


Walt G

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 The Franklin in the photo Dave posted is either a 1930 series 14 model 145 or 1931 series 15 model 151 or 152. Both cars used most of the similar components but had a different hood panel at the side which is hard to see here but I think I detect the lower spear louver on the hood side so it might possibly be the 1930 car. Absolutely wonderful driving automobile , minimal or no fatigue to drive long distances , Franklin's motto in that era was "Riding like gliding" and they indeed did do that. This is stated from experience - I have driven Franklin's of this era for nearly 60,000 miles.

Walt

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I have driven Studebakers all day on the highway, and have ridden in cars that are now vintage when I was way younger.  I have always found the chair-like seats with the multiple coil spring construction in them to be very comfortable after a long journey and no aches of any kind.  And this is/was without power adjustment and lumbar support that all these newer premium cars have with their mostly foam rubber cushioning.   

 

Craig

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2 hours ago, Walt G said:

 The Franklin in the photo Dave posted is either a 1930 series 14 model 145 or 1931 series 15 model 151 or 152. Both cars used most of the similar components but had a different hood panel at the side which is hard to see here but I think I detect the lower spear louver on the hood side so it might possibly be the 1930 car. Absolutely wonderful driving automobile , minimal or no fatigue to drive long distances , Franklin's motto in that era was "Riding like gliding" and they indeed did do that. This is stated from experience - I have driven Franklin's of this era for nearly 60,000 miles.

Walt

Quoted wrong post. See below.

Edited by Dave Gelinas (XP-300) (see edit history)
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2 hours ago, Dave Gelinas (XP-300) said:

Quoted wrong post. See below.

 

4 hours ago, Walt G said:

 The Franklin in the photo Dave posted is either a 1930 series 14 model 145 or 1931 series 15 model 151 or 152. Both cars used most of the similar components but had a different hood panel at the side which is hard to see here but I think I detect the lower spear louver on the hood side so it might possibly be the 1930 car. Absolutely wonderful driving automobile , minimal or no fatigue to drive long distances , Franklin's motto in that era was "Riding like gliding" and they indeed did do that. This is stated from experience - I have driven Franklin's of this era for nearly 60,000 miles.

Walt

It's a 1930 Walt. If you will notice the belt line at the windshield that extends to the hood, the 31's didn't have that. Their belt line stopped about 2 inches beyond the windshield post. Also, the 31's didn't have fender lights nor a rib down the center of the fender. 

 

Bill

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Posted (edited)

Happy 4th of July - and keep those fire extinguishers handy!  Here's the aftermath of the 1929 LA Auto show fire.  Extra Credit if you can find the Auburn Cabin Speedster without referring to the June, 1975 issue of "The Classic Car" magazine, the CCCA quarterly!  The tall building with the peaked roof still stands just south of the 10 freeway in downtown LA. 

LAautoShowFire1929_000017.jpg

LAautoShowFire1929leftside_000018.jpg

Edited by HK500 (see edit history)
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An Elgin motor sweeper in Philadelphia, 1917

 

Not a car, but rather a street sweeper.  A 1917 Elgin.  How would you like to get your arm caught in all those chains?    No safety guards at all. 

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ASU Sun Devils first ever homecoming parade led by the class of 1923. Cannot locate anything  on the Ford dealer Staples Motor Co in the background. 

 

The first ever homecoming parade in 1926, led by the class of 1923. (Photographer: University Archives, Arizona State University Libraries)

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On 7/4/2021 at 3:58 PM, K8096 said:

An Elgin motor sweeper in Philadelphia, 1917

 

Not a car, but rather a street sweeper.  A 1917 Elgin.  How would you like to get your arm caught in all those chains?    No safety guards at all. 

Elgin still makes street sweepers today.   I remember when our city here replaced their Mobil sweepers with Elgin sweepers.  They could be emptied 'on the fly' when a dump truck pulled up along side it, empty the contents of the dust bin, and then keep on sweeping.  Elgin Sweeper Company  

 

Craig

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A photo posted on a facebook page. Apparently taken at the 1906 Vanderbilt Cup race on Long Island.

 

I can see a Peerless radiator towards the lower right. Looks as if the folks have lifted the seat cushion so they can stand in the back to see the race.

 

The car in front of the Peerless with the round radiator and vents on the hood is a Hotchkiss I think - note the cape cart top.

 

Something heavy at lower right with platform rear springing - maybe too early to be a Cadillac? 

 

Could the white car at lower left be another Peerless?

 

Looks as if the limo's chauffeur has put the seat cushions on the roof to sit on.

 

 May be an image of standing, outdoors and monument

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A true vintage photo.  The men wear hats; not commonly done these days.  Bald tires -- check.  Gouged right front tire with a blown out hole -- yikes.  Model T jack -- got it.  Mud speckled paint job -- looks authentic.  Bent front fenders supported by an adjustable rod -- nice touch.  Hopefully the fender-mounted rolls of tarp do not prevent venting the engine compartment.  How in the world was the license plate bent with the crank handle in front of it?  A person just doesn't see this level of authenticity at judging events.

Ford T 095.jpg

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5 hours ago, LCK81403 said:

A true vintage photo.  The men wear hats; not commonly done these days.  Bald tires -- check.  Gouged right front tire with a blown out hole -- yikes.  Model T jack -- got it.  Mud speckled paint job -- looks authentic.  Bent front fenders supported by an adjustable rod -- nice touch.  Hopefully the fender-mounted rolls of tarp do not prevent venting the engine compartment.  How in the world was the license plate bent with the crank handle in front of it?  A person just doesn't see this level of authenticity at judging events.

Ford T 095.jpg

I am willing to bet the owner bent the plate himself so as not to cut off his fingers when cranking....

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Some photos just kind of makes the daily grind come to a stop.  This photo for instance.  While the headlights appear to not jive with the probable year of the car, the running light/parking light by the cowl appears to be a smaller version of the headlights.  While that is not a show stopper whatever the person is wearing on his/her head is a show stopper.  It looks like Easter Bunny ears.  What in the world is that, and why would he/she, 1) be seen in public with it (in those days), and 2) how well does it "ride" in a speedster?  One other quite curious thing is what are the two white marks on the road under the rear axle.  The day appears to be cloudy, no direct sunlight, yet underneath the car are two white-looking marks as if sunlight shines there.

image.png.aa2d8973b99ee863dbf6bb52a2388b83.png

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On 7/4/2021 at 9:28 AM, HK500 said:

Here's a Cadillac Executive and a famous athlete in a Cadillac Convertible, in a photo taken by the GM photographic section.  Who are they?

CadillacSkater_000026.jpg

 

Looking at the picture, I would bet that this picture was taken in the old GM Argonaut building behind the old GM Building on West Grand Boulevard in Detroit.  GM Photographic had studios there if my memory is correct.  I was there just a few times.  Their studios were if I remember correctly were on one of the upper floors in the GM complex.  Looking out the window, it would appear that the picture was not taken on a ground floor.

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1 hour ago, LCK81403 said:

Some photos just kind of makes the daily grind come to a stop.  This photo for instance.  While the headlights appear to not jive with the probable year of the car, the running light/parking light by the cowl appears to be a smaller version of the headlights.  While that is not a show stopper whatever the person is wearing on his/her head is a show stopper.  It looks like Easter Bunny ears.  What in the world is that, and why would he/she, 1) be seen in public with it (in those days), and 2) how well does it "ride" in a speedster?  One other quite curious thing is what are the two white marks on the road under the rear axle.  The day appears to be cloudy, no direct sunlight, yet underneath the car are two white-looking marks as if sunlight shines there.

image.png.aa2d8973b99ee863dbf6bb52a2388b83.png

 

Never underestimate the power of fashion. I expect that at 60 MPH those ears produced quite a flutter.

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9 hours ago, LCK81403 said:

  One other quite curious thing is what are the two white marks on the road under the rear axle.  The day appears to be cloudy, no direct sunlight, yet underneath the car are two white-looking marks as if sunlight shines there.

image.png.aa2d8973b99ee863dbf6bb52a2388b83.png

The picture is black and white. I suspect the two marks under the rear of the car are oil spots on the road.

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On 7/3/2021 at 9:33 AM, HK500 said:

Extra Credit if you can find the Auburn Cabin Speedster without referring to the June, 1975 issue of "The Classic Car" magazine, the CCCA quarterly!

 

Just a guess, but it is the only car I could find without fenders or front bumper. It's the one sitting sideways behind the large roadster...

 

Frank

lafire.jpg

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A photo posted on a facebook page - source not quoted. What I think is an early Rapid truck - date before 1910?  I guess you would have had to stand up to steer it into corners?

 

I guess the extra crew were needed to shovel the load off?

 

May be an image of 1 person, railroad and text that says 'CENTRAL COAL & COKE cO PHONES 2430 MAIN'

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Peace celebrations in Richmond, New Zealand, in 1919. I can't determine the month from the photo. From a quick look at local newspapers records it seem the peace celebrations for the whole of the British Empire were coordinated to occur on 4 August, the same date as war was declared in 1914. 

 

From the Pelorus Guardian 4 July 1919.

 

Article image

 

 

205089764_4067900049984803_3278005456700046632_n (2).jpg

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8 minutes ago, nzcarnerd said:

Peace celebrations in Richmond, New Zealand, in 1919. I can't determine the month from the photo. From a quick look at local newspapers records it seem the peace celebrations for the whole of the British Empire were coordinated to occur on 4 August, the same date as war was declared in 1914. 

 

From the Pelorus Guardian 4 July 1919.

 

Article image

 

 

205089764_4067900049984803_3278005456700046632_n (2).jpg

The front car is a 1918 Buick as is the 2nd behind the motorcycle

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2 hours ago, nzcarnerd said:

A photo posted on a facebook page - source not quoted. What I think is an early Rapid truck - date before 1910?  I guess you would have had to stand up to steer it into corners?

 

I guess the extra crew were needed to shovel the load off?

 

May be an image of 1 person, railroad and text that says 'CENTRAL COAL & COKE cO PHONES 2430 MAIN'

Photo looks to be heavily retouched in the style of the era so I think a bunch of details that would explain the operation have been lost.

 

But it looks like there are some doors/openings on the side of the vehicle where coal could be unloaded. I see hinges and levers but the required gaps and seams are missing (retouched away?).

 

Before my time, but houses used to have coal chutes into the basements from the street. I imagine that a ramp or slide between those probable openings and the chutes in the house would allow the truck to unload while parked parallel to the curb.

 

With all that guessing, I have to admit I don’t see a way to hook a slide onto the side of the truck below those door/opening looking things. Maybe that is what the chains dangling on the side are for. . .

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An interesting photo taken in the suburb of Fendalton in Christchurch, New Zealand, in 1925.

 

I thought the wire wheeled touring car with suicide doors front and rear might be an Essex but even though the Essex - and Hudson - sedans characteristically have suicide doors front and rear I think the touring cars don't.

 

The last photo is the same intersection today. Rossall St has had a major realignment and most of the old houses are gone. The trams stopped running through there soon after WW2. 

 

 

25 Rossall-Rhodes conrer looking SE.jpg

25 Rossall-Rhodes conrer looking SE (2).jpg

Web capture_11-7-2021_233015_www.google.com.jpeg

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Great view of the Rapid Truck.  It certainly does appear to be vintage 1910 era.  The second attached photo of a Rapid freight truck is captioned as a 1910 model.  Third photo, a Rapid "panel" appears to be complete with a English bull dog.  Fourth, a photo of a pre-1910 Rapid (hauling bed springs) has the engine under the body and shows the same chain drive configuration as the newer 1910 model that has the engine front-mounted under a hood.

 

An article in "The Automobile", November 24, 1910, page 898, col. 1:

 

Four-Cylinder Rapid Truck Announced

 

Pontiac, Mich., Nov. 21 -- The Rapid Motor Vehicle company, of this city, has begun the construction of a new truck.  A sample truck, which is the design of Engineer F. C. Frank, has been in use on the streets here.  The new Rapid is of two-ton capacity and has the engine under a hood on the front of the car instead of under it. 

The engine is of the four-cylinder type.  The new model, after being thoroughly tested, will be exhibited at various automobile shows throughout the country.  It is planned to ultimately discontinue the manufacture of the old two-cylinder truck.

 

 

Rapid truck.jpg

10 Rapid truck.jpg

Rapid trucks.jpg

w.jpg

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15 hours ago, nzcarnerd said:

A photo posted on a facebook page - source not quoted. What I think is an early Rapid truck - date before 1910?  I guess you would have had to stand up to steer it into corners?

 

I guess the extra crew were needed to shovel the load off?

 

May be an image of 1 person, railroad and text that says 'CENTRAL COAL & COKE cO PHONES 2430 MAIN'

 

13 hours ago, ply33 said:

But it looks like there are some doors/openings on the side of the vehicle where coal could be unloaded. I see hinges and levers but the required gaps and seams are missing (retouched away?).

 

Before my time, but houses used to have coal chutes into the basements from the street. I imagine that a ramp or slide between those probable openings and the chutes in the house would allow the truck to unload while parked parallel to the curb.

 

With all that guessing, I have to admit I don’t see a way to hook a slide onto the side of the truck below those door/opening looking things. Maybe that is what the chains dangling on the side are for. . .

 

The doors on side of the truck are the chutes for the coal to come out.  The doors hinge at the bottom and the chains allow the door to fold down and the chains keep  the door from dropping directly down.  The latches for the doors are at the upper corners of the doors.  When moved up, the door/chute open up.

 

I doubt the truck would unload at the curb.  It would probably pull up parallel to the house where most of the coal chutes to the basement I can remember were pointed to the driveway.

 

Just IMO.

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I note in the post above re Rapid trucks, the trucks in the second photo - presumable the new four cylinder model - has Northway Motor & Mnf. Company on the side. This would have been about the time that Billy Durant acquired both Rapid and Northway for GM. I see a mixed load on the truck, including tomato soup. There is a box marked ARGO amongst it. I wonder if it had anything to do with ARGO electric cars.

 

 

78064936_10Rapidtruck.jpg.daeb758a14affd85ed782db6dab7343c.jpg

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2 hours ago, twin6 said:

Stretch Pierce?

long.jpg

 

Interesting coincidence, this one was posted a short time ago on a facebook page. Not a very clear photo unfortunately.

 

I don't much about Pierce's commercial efforts. This one is dated at 1928 - photo or vehicle? Maybe both.

 

May be an image of one or more people, people standing and outdoors

 

 

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