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Period images to relieve some of the stress


Walt G

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13 hours ago, Dave Gelinas (XP-300) said:

November 1938. Capitol Avenue storefronts, Omaha, Nebraska.

November 1938. Capitol Avenue storefronts, Omaha, Nebraska..jpg

 

Wonderful photo! Notice the 1930/'31 model A Ford sedan delivery near the middle! Probably the earliest car there, nearly eight years old when the photo was taken, and looks to be in pretty nice shape still.

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12 hours ago, nzcarnerd said:

 

It is 'only' a 190SL. I guess even when new they were not cheap. Today it is only the very high prices for 300s that is bringing up the 190 prices. I have not had anything to do with them but my son works at a restoration shop and has driven one. He was less than impressed by it.

Guess I could make do with it at a push😊 

Edited by Pilgrim65 (see edit history)
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7 hours ago, wayne sheldon said:

 

Wonderful photo! Notice the 1930/'31 model A Ford sedan delivery near the middle! Probably the earliest car there, nearly eight years old when the photo was taken, and looks to be in pretty nice shape still.

Agree great photo , but coming from Uk I notice many of the shops are single story whereas in Uk are mostly the ground floor of at least 2 storeys , often homes above , if fact my first 11 years were spent above and rear of a cash register shop , lovely machines . 

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Here's a great looking  Franklin 12. The Japanese book " America Classic Cars" published in 1961  had this exact picture, and identified it as a LeBaron body.  That book is full of great original pictures of big Classic Cars.

1932Franklin12LeBaron_000022.jpg

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9 hours ago, nzcarnerd said:

 

Going by the registration plate on this BSA, and the one above, I think the location is Australia.


Looks like it, they are both Right Hand Drive 🤔🤔🤔🤔🤔🤔

Rodney 😀😀😀😀😀😀😀

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And the service area - also looks like the newest thing being worked on is an early straight eight car, off to the right.  And some much earlier cars, possibly twin six to the left.

EvanstonPackardServiceArea_000024.jpg

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4 hours ago, Pilgrim65 said:

Agree great photo , but coming from Uk I notice many of the shops are single story whereas in Uk are mostly the ground floor of at least 2 storeys , often homes above , if fact my first 11 years were spent above and rear of a cash register shop , lovely machines . 

In the town I grew up in the downtown are had mostly two and three story buildings with professional offices and a few apartments on the upper floors.    In the other smaller retail areas they tended to be one story until one of the early shopping centers in America was built there in about 1957. Still in use.

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Posted (edited)

Great photos of the two convertible sedans, a pair of true custom bodied vehicles! I wonder if both vehicles were owned by the same person? Perhaps the fellow to the left in the photo.

It would be very historically correct and proper to dress as he is outfitted and bring your car on the right to the next concours event! You could produce a copy of this photo to prove that all is exactly period correct - maybe even get bonus points so you could get the top premier award!  It may promote a new attitude and presence at PB and Amelia! Get both of them shown here invited to park next to each other.

The only thing I am disappointed of in this period photo is that the Conestoga custom to the left does not have the optional white wheels nor the chrome plated wood spokes.

 

Edited by Walt G
spelling correction (see edit history)
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Yes, that will fit the new "Pebble" class perfectly. Official hat and goggles too!  This particular example would loose at least1,000 points for the bent front license plate and chassis muck.  Still needs to be tarted up a bit for PB though with plated wheels, polished hood, and the addition of pairs of fog, spot, driving lamps and a 35 lb. gold plated flying pelican for a radiator cap.

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Highway 410, also known as Chinook Pass Highway, also known as Naches Pass Highway, also known as Yakima Pass Highway, somewhere near Greenwater, Washington, 1920.
Asahel Curtis photo.

204193669_5994519080566177_3658881780119748412_n.jpg

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9 hours ago, HK500 said:

Here's a great looking  Franklin 12. The Japanese book " America Classic Cars" published in 1961  had this exact picture, and identified it as a LeBaron body.  That book is full of great original pictures of big Classic Cars.

1932Franklin12LeBaron_000022.jpg

Franklin V12 Club Brougham

DSC00845.JPG

DSC00871.JPG

DSC00846.JPG

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9 hours ago, Dave Gelinas (XP-300) said:

Rolls Royce Silver Shadow II Krug Panel Van '1979

Rolls Royce Silver Shadow II Krug Panel Van '1979.jpg

WELL! We couldn't have our champagne delivered in a lowly without class ford or chevy now could we? More unusual than the custom Rolls is the fact that it has whitewall tires and it's a British car delivering French Champagne.

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8 hours ago, Pilgrim65 said:

Great little car were they produced open sided or was a this specially modified job , perhaps to show her legs 😆

Austin Clark had at least one of these at his L.I. Auto Museum and it sat on display in the museum rarely used except in a local parade sometimes. I don't think any built had doors . We both agreed that with little or no doors and the chance of falling out being present, it was better to have that possibly happen in his type 35 Mercer raceabout at 70 mph then the Fiat at 20 mph. This was the logic at the time 45+ years ago . 😉

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9 minutes ago, Walt G said:

Austin Clark had at least one of these at his L.I. Auto Museum and it sat on display in the museum rarely used except in a local parade sometimes. I don't think any built had doors . We both agreed that with little or no doors and the chance of falling out being present, it was better to have that possibly happen in his type 35 Mercer raceabout at 70 mph then the Fiat at 20 mph. This was the logic at the time 45+ years ago . 😉

The Citroen Mehari and Austin Mini Moke were similar vehicles.

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1 hour ago, Walt G said:

Austin Clark had at least one of these at his L.I. Auto Museum and it sat on display in the museum rarely used except in a local parade sometimes. I don't think any built had doors . We both agreed that with little or no doors and the chance of falling out being present, it was better to have that possibly happen in his type 35 Mercer raceabout at 70 mph then the Fiat at 20 mph. This was the logic at the time 45+ years ago . 😉

Doors were on option on the Crosley HotShot, and the  Excalibur Series I didn't have doors, either.

 

Craig

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Dave, this photo that you posted is a real keeper.  The caption information attached to the photo is Omaha, Nebraska in 1938.  It has been noted by another member that 1938 was in the time period of the Great Depression years.  The photo shows only two elderly cars, both Model A Fords that, depending on their year of production, were right on the very beginning of the Depression.  Hence it is interesting that there are so many newer 1930s cars in the photo.  My father trapped muskrats to help with a little cash flow in the Depression years.  He told me that times were tough enough that sometimes he could only afford to buy one .22 caliber bullet at a time time in a hardware store for his muskrat trapping, hunting, and processing.  Some of the old timers in our small mid-west town continued to drive their vehicles that survived the Depression, just in case the Depression came back again.  My grandfather drove his '31 Plymouth (with a Ford Model A engine) until about 1958 when he traded it in for a "new" car, a '39 Chevrolet.  Model A's were not uncommon to see, and one old guy for years continued to drive his Model T depot hack even though the passenger train stopped coming in the early 1950s.  He gave me a ride in the depot hack out to dad's mink farm one time.  A wonderful Oakland sedan was a common feature seen around town.  One last fond memory sparked by this photo involved a drag race from a signal light with my uncle's 1934 Ford versus a 1955 or '56 Buick.  That was no contest at all, the '34 Ford was a jack rabbit compared with that obese lumbering Buick.

 

355931805_November1938.CapitolAvenuestorefrontsOmahaNebraska..jpg.ecb01292c44d171a5e109c64bfcf5590.jpg

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