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Period images to relieve some of the stress


Walt G

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1 hour ago, Walt G said:

Dave , thanks so much for all your time and contributions, all were most welcome and really great.

There is so much pre WWII era stuff out there , laying dormant in peoples collections for decades, not intentionally but just because there was no way to share to a vast audience on a regular basis and frequently.  Or perhaps there was no real story to go with the image, so with the opportunity to post /share it here , the tremendous input of knowledge has let us all enjoy what we would never have seen. thanks to all of you - I will keep repeating that as I am so grateful to all of you.

WG

Well said! 

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15 hours ago, Dave Gelinas (XP-300) said:

33742790436_320478b888_b.jpg

Wow, dig those demountable wood wheels. I think this is quite early for demountables, most cars had artillery type wood wheels. Also double horns. One electric, one bulb type. And double whitewall tires. 

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Wonderful photo of the dealership and the damage. These are the kind of stories we need to learn more about. The "everyday " happenings of a long gone era.  It puts a better picture into view of what went on, had to be dealt with, etc. beyond the particular make, series and body style of the cars.

 

This , everyday situation, really made a great impression on me 40+ years ago when I attended an AACA annual meeting ( before it was renamed a convention) when held at the Bellview-Stratford Hotel . Someone arranged for some 16mm news films to be shown and it was some footage of a auto junk yard north or east of Philadelphia . It showed a decade old Packard sedan being driven in under its own power just before WWII I believe, the car was going to be salvaged for its metal content. The gasoline was drained and then a flaming roll of newspaper was thrown into the rear seat area. It was an example of how to ( with the least amount of effort) get rid of upholstery, wood body framework, etc so that the metal that remained could then be salvaged. There was quite a loud moan up from the audience watching a 1929-31 era Packard loose its life that way.

This photo of the dealership just gives us all a great sense of what had to be dealt with to rebuild a shop that sales and service could then continue to generate income.

Walt

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2 hours ago, hook said:

Wow, dig those demountable wood wheels. I think this is quite early for demountables, most cars had artillery type wood wheels. Also double horns. One electric, one bulb type. And double whitewall tires. 

Forget the wheel makers name, they were two piece STEEL stampings welded together to look like a wood wheel. My 1912 AC had them. 

 

Bob  

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The Mayfield Car Company in Burbank, CA.  There are recognizable cars that now exist in major collections! The DuPont is an obvious one.  I think this was taken sometime in the 1950's.  Set the Flux Capacitor to 1955 and buy up the whole lot at full price!

MayfieldCarCompany_000174.jpg

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7 hours ago, 1937hd45 said:

Forget the wheel makers name, they were two piece STEEL stampings welded together to look like a wood wheel. My 1912 AC had them. 

 

Bob  

 

Yes, usually referred to as Sankey wheels. They usually had a wooden 'filler' inside the spokes I think.

 

The reason for the name is explained here - The story of the steel wheel (themanufacturer.com)

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On 6/12/2021 at 11:45 AM, Casper Friederich said:

Dampers

 

 

The one I have is just a pair of small coil springs. I believe they were intended provide the spring action on smooth , in town roads. For anything rough they would bottom out and the main springs would come into play. No attempt to dampen the ride like a friction shock.

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19 Garford truck from my Garford file. Under Willys ownership Garford trucks were produced through 1933 when production of the trucks and the Willys Knight automobile ceased and production shifted to the inexpensive Willys 77. Thanks to 1937hd45 for stimulating my research. I don’t think I have ever seen a Willys 77. The photo posted earlier was in a box of family photos. 

FF3A33D2-C298-46E2-8521-A24AAC2919BC.jpeg

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17283u.jpg

Washington, D.C. April 3, 1929. June and Farrar Burn and family on G Street with their "Ballad Bungalow."

 

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 Payne Service  September 1939. "Combination filling station, garage, blacksmith shop
and grocery store. R.F.D. Danville, Pittsylvania County, Virginia."

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May 1939. Washington, D.C. "Alleyway [Zei Alley] between H, I, 14th and 15th streets N.W."

 

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December 1940. "Signs in Alexandria, Louisiana, advertising military wearing apparel and goods

 

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July 1942. "Chevy Chase, Maryland. Serving supper to motorists at an A&W Hot Shoppes restaurant."

 

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6 hours ago, alsancle said:

ThomasFlyer.jpg

After looking at New Your To Paris Thomas Flyer photos for 60 years this it the first time I noticed it left New York with factory fenders! When were they removed? 

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R861788bb0895a96cd8298d11c921c31f.jpg

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1 hour ago, 1937hd45 said:

After looking at New Your To Paris Thomas Flyer photos for 60 years this it the first time I noticed it left New York with factory fenders! When were they removed? 

Rd573031183b6f3d8b419feed8a631956.jpg

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And....when was the front axle changed from wavy to straight?

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8 hours ago, alsancle said:

This was living large in 1958.

Caddy-1958.jpg

 

 

Yup....living large....but the garage is too small. My historic neighborhood had additions to almost every garage to add five feet.......except mine!

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3 hours ago, edinmass said:

 

 

Yup....living large....but the garage is too small. My historic neighborhood had additions to almost every garage to add five feet.......except mine!

Blame Harley Earl, he figured out postwar Americans would gladly fork out premium prices for a few extra inches of wheelbase and many extra inches of rear overhang for the extended-deck Pontiacs, Oldsmobiles, Buicks and Cadillacs.  When GM lead, all others were compelled to follow or lose sales.   Can't accommodate 226" in your garage?  Time for a garage extension!

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OK, more odd and bizarre from my files. I can't date this exactly but am guessing it is ca. 1938. Made by the Moto-Scoot Manufacturing Company ( 215 South Western Ave.) Chicago, Illinois . They primarily made single and tandem scooters that used an air cooled  4 cycle motor with ball bearing crankshaft. they even had a sidecar available at extra cost to use as a delivery vehicle. Their motto was " Go and come as you please - Make this your " Declaration of Independence".

MOTOscoot3wheeler1938.jpg

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5 minutes ago, Walt G said:

OK, more odd and bizarre from my files. I can't date this exactly but am guessing it is ca. 1938. Made by the Moto-Scoot Manufacturing Company ( 215 South Western Ave.) Chicago, Illinois . They primarily made single and tandem scooters that used an air cooled  4 cycle motor with ball bearing crankshaft. they even had a sidecar available at extra cost to use as a delivery vehicle. Their motto was " Go and come as you please - Make this your " Declaration of Independence".

MOTOscoot3wheeler1938.jpg


Walt, if you have one of these I expect it to come to me and not Ed.

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Nope, don't have one of these, just about a dozen early to mid 1960s pedal cars I don't need, which I can't get to until I get the 1936 Packard club sedan running again to move it out of the way.

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