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Period images to relieve some of the stress


Walt G

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Photo of the Alfa Romeo with the guy holding the sheet up behind it was taken in London. The sheet would give a blank back ground for the photo to be used in a magazine. This was especially done in London before the annual Motor shows held at the Imperial Palace and "Ally Pally" Alexandria Palace . If you look in the annual show numbers of the magazines Autocar and Motor you will see photographs of the cars with no back ground, that is how this was accomplished - the back ground was not air brushed out - they also did it in the exhibition hall so the focus would be on the particular car and not see a distracting busy field of other displays , signs etc.

I have hundreds of pre war motor show and salon photographs that have this feature. It was mostly only done in London - Paris, Brussels and Berlin did not photograph cars that way.

Walt

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On 5/23/2021 at 5:43 PM, alsancle said:


The E&J is just as bad.  There was a Halogen conversion kit for them that I bought.  I assume there will be an LED one soon if not already.


 

Aj, both Woodlites and E&J lights are as bright as your charming personality............but I shouldn’t always give you a hard time, even though you deserve it. Your wonderful wife and very well raised children do earn a tip of my hat in admiration............you have a wonderful family, and decent taste in cars........especially when you listen to my advice. Fortunately, I don’t plan on driving your Stutz (with original installed E&J lamps at night.). How are we doing on my tubes?

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Posted (edited)
On 5/26/2021 at 12:41 PM, twin6 said:

A big Olds outside the Cliff House, San Francisco.

Cliff House.jpg


That’s not a big Olds......that’s a Limited. It defines BIG. Then, and now. Great shot. An identical car was sold new in my hometown of Ludlow Massachuetts. It was driven by a engineer who acted as chauffeur......his grandson is a good friend of mine, and has a bunch of photos of the car back in the day, but they don’t want them published unfortunately.


 

UPDATE- it could also be a mid sized Olds Autocrat...........

Edited by edinmass (see edit history)
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2 hours ago, raybelf said:

The Oldsmobile looks more like a 1912 Olds Autocrat 7 passenger rather then a Limited, based on the length of the hood


The double running board makes it a Limited? No?

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1 hour ago, BobinVirginia said:

I like it whatever that big thing is!!! 
 

 

1 hour ago, edinmass said:


The double running board makes it a Limited? No?

 

Not necessarily. I would have to look up the models to refresh my memory. Been a long time since I have seen or talked with anyone that had one. However a good friend of mine fifty some years ago was a good friend of Wayne Weathers that had one of the largest Oldsmobiles ever built! I met him several times, and saw his Oldsmobile up close on several occasions. I think his was a 1914. (Sometime I should tell the story of the nasty accident he had with that car, well enough known it can be told, and a good story! (He told me the story himself.))

Oldsmobile had at least three large model cars during years between 1910 and 1915, given names like "Autocrat" and "Limited". For several of those years, the two largest models both had double running boards! I am fairly certain the pictured car is not the largest model, likely the middle size car. (I don't offhand recall the name for it?)

Also about thirty years ago, I visited an antique auto repair shop that was working on one of the middle size Oldsmobile cars (a 1912 or 1913 if I recall correctly?). So I got up very close to it and its double running boards! Standing next to that brass era monster and knowing it wasn't the BIG one was quite a feeling! Standing next to it, you know that one actually needed the two sets of running boards to climb into that thing. Having been next to the one thirty years ago, and seeing this picture now, the two cars look nearly identical.

Having stood next to both the middle size car thirty years ago, and Wayne Weathers' 1914 only a few years before? Wayne Weathers' car was considerably larger.

 

All that off the top of my head.

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Limited

Autocrat

Defender

 

Looking at google images, only the Limited has the double running boards.

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On 5/26/2021 at 10:30 AM, Dave Gelinas (XP-300) said:

1959 Chevrolet Converetible.jpg

 

On 5/26/2021 at 10:30 AM, Dave Gelinas (XP-300) said:

1959 Chevrolet Converetible.jpg

     The 1E in the license tag indicates it's rental car in Dade County FL (Miami)  This was 1959 and later they changed the

      law so that rental cars would not be so easily spotted and victimized.  

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Posted (edited)

Although these are not period photos, I believe the car deserves it's placement here in this thread.

Just Gorgeous. 

1929 Peerless 8 125 7 Passenger Sedan

 

As a side note.

This car was used in the weekly television series "The Untouchables" (1959-1963) as a "Mob" car. 

1929 Peerless 8 125 7 Passenger Sedan.jpg

 

 

1929 Peerless Model 8-125.jpg

1929 Peerless 8 125 7 Passenger Sedan - -.jpg

1929 Peerless 8 125 7 Passenger Sedan Rear View.jpg

Edited by Dave Gelinas (XP-300) (see edit history)
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The Peerless was restored in Southern Florida, and I had a small part in getting it running. Neat car, very well done.

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4 hours ago, Dave Gelinas (XP-300) said:

Montgomery, Alabama, Perry Avenue.

Circa: 1906

Montgomery, Alabama, circa 1906. Perry Avenue.jpg

Beautiful homes. Would be fun to see photos of them today. 

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Last fall we had an Autocrat on tour and the only photo I have which shows double running boards is this group shot.  The Autocrat is parked near the center of the line.  Gary

 

1398967608_DSC_3984(2).thumb.JPG.9c1fe25f9090cba3dba00162ee340814.jpg

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10 hours ago, Dave Gelinas (XP-300) said:

Although these are not period photos, I believe the car deserves it's placement here in this thread.

Just Gorgeous. 

1929 Peerless 8 125 7 Passenger Sedan

 

As a side note.

This car was used in the weekly television series "The Untouchables" (1959 to 1963 )as a "Mob Car".

 

 

That is a really nice car that they picked great colors on and then proceeded to crap in their pants when they did the wheels.

 

The later big Peerless cars are almost never seen.   There are maybe a dozen of them?   Jeff our Peerless guy can give exact numbers.  

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2 minutes ago, alsancle said:

That is a really nice car that they picked great colors on and then proceeded to crap in their pants when they did the wheels.

What do you mean?  

 

The color of the wheels really nicely offset the dark maroon paintwork on the body.

 

Craig

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19 minutes ago, 8E45E said:

What do you mean?  

 

The color of the wheels really nicely offset the dark maroon paintwork on the body.

 

Craig

 

I have three issues:

 

1.   I hate whitewalls in general,  but especially on a car that had about a 1% chance of wearing them originally.

 

2.  Wheel color should be darker than body color as a rule.

 

3.  This wheel color with the whitewalls scream at you and all you see are wheels and no car.

 

 

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5 minutes ago, alsancle said:

 

I have three issues:

 

1.   I hate whitewalls in general,  but especially on a car that had about a 1% chance of wearing them originally.

 

2.  Wheel color should be darker than body color as a rule.

 

3.  This wheel color with the whitewalls scream at you and all you see are wheels and no car.

 

 

What 'should be' and what was are two different things.  Generally, if the wheels were a different color than the main body, they would be a contrasting color; in other words, if the car had a dark finish, the wheels would be a lighter finish, and vice versa.  I have some older Studebaker color charts, and the wheels were always a contrasting shade.

 

I am totally indifferent toward whitewalls on any car.  On this car, it would appear just as good with blackwalls, as it does with whitewalls.

 

Craig

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2 minutes ago, 8E45E said:

What 'should be' and what was are two different things.  Generally, if the wheels were a different color than the main body, they would be a contrasting color; in other words, if the car had a dark finish, the wheels would be a lighter finish, and vice versa.  I have some older Studebaker color charts, and the wheels were always a contrasting shade.

 

I am totally indifferent toward whitewalls on any car.  On this car, it would appear just as good with blackwalls, as it does with whitewalls.

 

Craig

 

 

Everybody has different taste.   We can agree to disagree.   In this case, at least two guys in the world love it,   you and other owner.   So right now I'm outnumbered.

 

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15 minutes ago, alsancle said:

 

I have three issues:

 

1.   I hate whitewalls in general,  but especially on a car that had about a 1% chance of wearing them originally.

 

2.  Wheel color should be darker than body color as a rule.

 

3.  This wheel color with the whitewalls scream at you and all you see are wheels and no car.

 

 

   Just because the 1920's & 1930's are most oftened photographed in black and white, does not mean that

   color was not popular then.   While the Great Depression is shown in black & white and extra money for flashy

   cars was not always possible.   Whitewalls and pin striping gave a little flair to an otherwise hard time.   Color was 

   available, as evidenced by seeing the Concourse De Elegance pictures of today's shows.   The car that EdinMass

   displayed at Amelia Island was awesome in blues & greys.   However it started out black with a white chassis in

   1930.  While that was flashy in 1930, apparently the blues & greys were available then too.

    Did you know that even old Henry Ford wrote to his dealers in 1915, saying "Paint the Model T any color the

    customer wants, just sell them a car"   Suggested price to repaint the car in 1915 was $20.00.   On a $440.00

    car, why wouldn't you choose other than black?  (I did)

    It's kind of like going to chruch in a T-Shirt & baseball cap or the bride who got married with her hair in curlers

    because she wanted to look good at the reception.

    Whitewalls, Pin Stripes, wheel colors and accessories are all part of looking our best.   IMHO.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Posted (edited)
43 minutes ago, alsancle said:

 

I have three issues:

 

1.   I hate whitewalls in general,  but especially on a car that had about a 1% chance of wearing them originally.

 

2.  Wheel color should be darker than body color as a rule.

 

3.  This wheel color with the whitewalls scream at you and all you see are wheels and no car.

 

 

Big whitewalls on a car from this era remind me of  "Big White Toilet Seats".  Great if your a plumber by trade :)

Edited by 34LaSalleClubSedan (see edit history)
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3 minutes ago, 34LaSalleClubSedan said:

Big whitewalls on a car from this era remind me of  "Big White Toilet Seats".  Great if your a plumber by trade :)

Let's take a vote.

 

Would you rather clean a toilet, or be continuously on your hands and knees keeping those wide whites spotless prior to every show??!?

 

Craig

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10 minutes ago, Paul Dobbin said:

   Just because the 1920's & 1930's are most oftened photographed in black and white, does not mean that

   color was not popular then.   While the Great Depression is shown in black & white and extra money for flashy

   cars was not always possible.   Whitewalls and pin striping gave a little flair to an otherwise hard time.   Color was 

   available, as evidenced by seeing the Concourse De Elegance pictures of today's shows.   The car that EdinMass

   displayed at Amelia Island was awesome in blues & greys.   However it started out black with a white chassis in

   1930.  While that was flashy in 1930, apparently the blues & greys were available then too.

    Did you know that even old Henry Ford wrote to his dealers in 1915, saying "Paint the Model T any color the

    customer wants, just sell them a car"   Suggested price to repaint the car in 1915 was $20.00.   On a $440.00

    car, why wouldn't you choose other than black?  (I did)

    It's kind of like going to chruch in a T-Shirt & baseball cap or the bride who got married with her hair in curlers

    because she wanted to look good at the reception.

    Whitewalls, Pin Stripes, wheel colors and accessories are all part of looking our best.   IMHO.

 

Paul,  like I said to Craig, to each his own.

 

But I want you to compare the tires in the Marlene Dietrich photo of the Rolls with the tires on the Peerless and tell me they are the same.

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