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Period images to relieve some of the stress


Walt G

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Check out the following website for a little tidbit on the Lincoln Zephyr / Volkswagen connection. www.industrialdesignhistory.com/taxonomy/term/298

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1933 Continental Ace


Automotive history is littered with short-lived, obscure makes and models that still deserve recognition for their place in that panorama, one such is Continental Motor Corporation's 1933 Continental Ace.  Borne out of the need to survive and recover some of the debts owed by the failing DeVaux Motors, itself sprung from Billy Durant's failing Durant Motors, Continental teamed with Hayes Body Company, DeVaux other major creditor, to field a line of low and lower-middle priced cars   The first image is their advertisement in the Motor magazine, January 1933, enlisting dealers to sign-up.


The Continental Ace was their top-line offering in sedan, Deluxe sedan and coupe styles, priced $745, $816 and $725 respectively.  Up against such heady competition as the Chrysler CO Six, Oldsmobile F-Series Six, Nash Big Six Series 1120 and Hudson Super Six Series E, all better established with wide-spread dealership availability, only 651 Aces sold for 1933.   It would not return for 1934 when only the Beacon continued.   Although Continental was well-known as an engine builder and Hayes Bodies were utilized by dozens of carmakers, neither was known as a complete car builder.   It was the nadir of the Depression, a chancy proposition to take a flyer on a new start-up make.


As might be expected, period images of the Continental Ace are rare.  Fortunately, Mr. Phil Rolffs posted the second image in the "What is it" form.  He graciously granted permission to include it in this brief Continental Ace exploration and provided the following background.

 

" It was taken at my grandmother's house on West Lake in Portage Michigan.  Her name was Clara Rolffs.  I believe that the young lady in the photo is my mother's younger sister, and my aunt,  Edith McManus.  (Later her married name became Moretti).  She was from New York City, as was my mother.  (But I'm not 100% sure that it's my Aunt Edith.  Just reasonably sure)!


I don't know who this car belonged to.  Pretty sure it wasn't my dad's car.  We had some fairly well-to-do relatives in Detroit who visited often in the summer.  My bet is it belonged to one of them.  Probably the same guy shot the photo.  It's a 5 by 7 print.  I'm sure this wasn't taken with a Kodak Brownie, and that's the only type of camera my folks might have had at that time."


Thanks to Mr. Rolffs for sharing this rare photographic evidence of a car rarely encountered in its day and virtually extinct now.   Survival rate is likely only four-to-six cars.  The third image is a period promotion item.
 

Quote

 

 

Continental Motors 1933 a.JPG

'33 Continental Ace sedan - Michigan 1934.jpg

'33 Continental Ace sedan.jpg

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Posted (edited)
19 hours ago, Pilgrim65 said:

That’s interesting , I was told originally beetles were made pre war, something about Adolf wanting a cheap people’s car 

Yep, it was Adolph's baby; a car that was affordable for the common folk (hence, People's Car), that was capable of doing 62 miles an hour on his other pet project, the Autobahn, all day without self-destructing.  

 

With the leader of the project dead, his mistress dead and all the development team of the People's Car who were part of that former government either in prison or dead  before the war had ended, there was obviously a valid reason to rebuild the factory and continue production of it; mass unemployment being the main factor.  What was rather amazing is how it never received the negative impact the Swastika earned after the war for being a 'reminder' of that era in German history; and most likely, because it hadn't fully established itself as an icon like it did in the postwar years.   

 

Craig

Edited by 8E45E (see edit history)
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Posted (edited)
22 hours ago, alsancle said:

 

I swapped some emails with him a couple of months ago.  I guess he got tired of some of the posters.

 

Can you tell us more ? He had some very interesting cars, but many were badly deteriorated by decades of bad storage. And his prices while not totally out of this world , were often a bit on the steep side once condition was considered. 

I really didn't understand his attitude. It's rare . It's way too hard to take good photo's . That's my price. Pay or get lost. I am a really busy man , just don't have time to waste on $5,000 - $10,000 cars. If it does not sell it goes back into the shed for a few more decades.

 Just seemed to be a really strange way to sell project cars.

But this hobby does seem to have its share of eccentrics .

 

  

Edited by 1912Staver (see edit history)
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2 hours ago, 1912Staver said:

 

Can you tell us more ? He had some very interesting cars, but many were badly deteriorated by decades of bad storage. And his prices while not totally out of this world , were often a bit on the steep side once condition was considered. 

I really didn't understand his attitude. It's rare . It's way too hard to take good photo's . That's my price. Pay or get lost. I am a really busy man , just don't have time to waste on $5,000 - $10,000 cars. If it does not sell it goes back into the shed for a few more decades.

 Just seemed to be a really strange way to sell project cars.

But this hobby does seem to have its share of eccentrics .

 

I went back and looked.  I mischaracterized his email.   He has gotten busy with other projects right now and hasn't had time for the forum.    I expect/hope he will return at some point.

 

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16 hours ago, edinmass said:


Currently owned by a very good friend of mine. Fast as hell. Two stroke.

Mr. Stutz?  I saw that car on a tour in Mass. years ago.  Is it the only survivor?

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An Overland in Illinois.  How many makes of car had the oval filler neck on the radiator, which I have always understood was to more easily allow adding water with a bucket?

Overland in Illinois 1917.jpg

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Back in the ancient times in the car hobby, the Northern Illinois region of the CCCA published "The Dashboard" with Purple mimeograph or ditto ink.  For graphic content, they included a glossy 8X10 photo called "Classic Salon".  Here's one with some captioning errors, which you can figure out by clicking on this link that show more pics of this stunning car.  Folklore is the original car is lost but replicas exist. https://www.scale143.com/viewtopic.php?t=12428

1936FigoniDelage_000002.jpg

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Posted (edited)
20 hours ago, Matt Harwood said:

Looks like these two images were taken at roughly the same location. Amazing how much things changed in a very short period of time, since both appear to be late 1940s.

 

SHORPY-N4-038A.jpg&ehk=ZcdFMF0434coD%2B2wX1XdYE4KhHPL2PGt6WQesbZ9NUc=&risl=&pid=ImgRaw

 

SHORPY-N4-017A.jpg?itok=_KzYHhuN

I don't understand your point. Both pictures were probably taken on the same day, just farther down the street, maybe a couple blocks. Even the flag on the columned building on the left. And the same overcast cloudy day. So, what changes? 

Edited by hook
left out (see edit history)
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1 hour ago, jukejunkie1015 said:

Fill er up!

Muller_Bros.jpg

Standard_Station1931.jpg

El_Patio_Auto_Laundry_ca1927.jpg

   "Filler UP',  by 1963 when I was a pump jockey, we never had 5 attendents on a car.  However I guess 

    we never had a LaSalle come in our station.   We didn't have 5 employees either.

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Posted (edited)
On 6/22/2020 at 11:20 AM, John_Mereness said:

COACHBUILD.com • View topic - LeBaron Cord

 

COACHBUILD.com • View topic - LeBaron Cord

 

Deco Diva Town Cars – 1917-1948 | Automobile companies, Automotive ...

As a sidenote:  There are motion picture film that briefly features this car out in Los Angeles circa 1938 = a "Mystery Studios" film called "Double Danger" staring Preston Foster, Whitney Bourne, plus Donald Meek and Samuel S. Hinds.   The car appears in the film as a delivery vehicle for a high end Jewelry store (the rear door window is blanked out with the company logo in the window).  In film it has lost it luggage trunk, though now sports Lyon two piece metal spare tire covers and a double pilot ray, as well as double whitewalls.    

I have been trying to find the clip of the film showing the  car in the movie Double Danger.

YouTube had it at one time but now it is gone.

It made a great sedan delivery in the film.

Wish I could find it.

Edited by Dave Gelinas (XP-300) (see edit history)
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The photo posted on Tuesday by HK500 of the Delage D-6 fastback was taken at the Paris Salon when on display there.  The D-6 I believe was a 6 cylinder car and the D-8 their 8 cylinder car.  There will be a story on the Motor Shows and Salons held in Europe prior to  WWII in issue # 2 of Crankshaft magazine due out next month. It will have many period photographs taken at the shows in London and Paris.

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