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Period images to relieve some of the stress


Walt G

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1 hour ago, 58L-Y8 said:

Simplex Crane 1916

Simplex Crane 1916.JPG


 

Body in the ad is Brewster..........fantastic car.

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I believe the cars tucked away were in New Jersey?

 

Regarding the green wall tires in the Goodrich advertisement. This was a promotion in late 1932. I have a color sales catalog issued by Goodrich of Akron, Ohio that is 24 pages long devoted to these assorted colors that were available. Half the pages were full size 9 1/2 x 12 inches, the other 12 were half size and showed and individual tire with the chosen color ( red, blue, green, gray, etc. ) They state inside ""Which tire will correctly harmonize with the color of my car?" The name on the cover of the catalog is New Feathers for the Peacock. This is not a joke I am serious!!!  I just scanned and sent the pages of the catalog to my good friends Hedi and Chris Charlton of Maine and I expect it will get some mention in the New England Region CCCA magazine that they edit. I only did this within the past 2 days!

I have to much weird stuff in my collection ,

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Cadillac offered color “white wall” tires in 1932. I have seen red and green originals, as well as orange tires that was on the Mormon Meteor. I have never seen the publication Walt has.........and Matt Sonfield’s excellent paper on tires of the classic era never mentioned the Goodrich product. 

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22 minutes ago, Walt G said:

I believe the cars tucked away were in New Jersey?

 

Regarding the green wall tires in the Goodrich advertisement. This was a promotion in late 1932. I have a color sales catalog issued by Goodrich of Akron, Ohio that is 24 pages long devoted to these assorted colors that were available. Half the pages were full size 9 1/2 x 12 inches, the other 12 were half size and showed and individual tire with the chosen color ( red, blue, green, gray, etc. ) They state inside ""Which tire will correctly harmonize with the color of my car?" The name on the cover of the catalog is New Feathers for the Peacock. This is not a joke I am serious!!!  I just scanned and sent the pages of the catalog to my good friends Hedi and Chris Charlton of Maine and I expect it will get some mention in the New England Region CCCA magazine that they edit. I only did this within the past 2 days!

I have to much weird stuff in my collection ,

Did any manufacturers actually offer them as OEM equipment?

 

Craig

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I have never seen any factory publications offering the colored side wall tires ( even just dealership focused material)  . This was a promotion ( my guessing it didn't last long at all) by Goodrich to see if it could boost sales in anyway possible since the era it was being promoted was just 3 years into the great depression. A friend of mine long since passed away - Les Cutting of Huntington, NY collected cars of the 1914-1929 era, mostly orphans and he also had a collection of odd tread, color, size tires just because he thought they were neat. He didn't have any of these Goodrich tires. Reminds me of a roll of Lifesaver candies.

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I had heard of this many years ago, but never noticed any original literature or surviving tires.

I am a lot more familiar with colored and multi colored clincher and straight-side tires of the 1910s. I have seen several magazine colored advertisements from before 1923, and known a few collectors that had decent surviving original tires. One fellow (a Pierce Arrow collector) had about four such tires mounted on his shop walls! Reds, grays, and greens in a variety of combinations of sidewalls and treads. Those I got to get up close to. I have heard of blue.

So much neat stuff in automotive history.

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13 hours ago, 8E45E said:

Packard used a Bijur automatic lubricating system.

 

 Yes, our 1930 Packard 733 7-PanssengerTouring has a fully functional Bijur lubricating system, advising that we pull the handle once each day.

had I done that during the year of Covid-19, our garage floor would reprise the EXXON VALDEZ

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I think almost all high end cars in the 28-34 range had some form of "one shot" chassis lubrication.   Bijur was the one you hear about most,  but Mercedes had their own,  Rolls Royce, etc.

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8 hours ago, BobinVirginia said:

That’s a gangster looking pic. Any known history on the picture? 

I believe one of these gents (on the right?) is Albert Mussey Johnson (May 31, 1872 – January 7, 1948) (Wiki help) ---an eccentric millionaire who served for many years as president of the National Life Insurance Company, built Scotty's Castle in Death Valley, and was variously partner, friend, and dupe of infamous Wild West con man Death Valley Scotty, for whose outrageous antics he later served as financier.

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Posted (edited)

In the summer of 1919 the building at 218-220 St. Helens Avenue was the home of Sam J. Kenyon's Marmon Service Station and Batons Auto Laundry. Mr. Kenyon specialized in servicing and repairing luxury automobiles known for their speed and power.

 

Kurt M.

Tacoma WA

Marmon.png

Edited by jukejunkie1015
Text issue (see edit history)
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