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Period images to relieve some of the stress


Walt G

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New fenders of unusual shape, falling to the bumper.  Better protection against thrown mud, avoids gusts of wind under the fenders which cause a large resistance to moving forward.  Avoids the need for supplemental bumper guards.

 

Not word for word

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I really enjoy and appreciate all these photos but especially the ones like this with artwork painted on the sides of buildings, barns, tops of hotels etc. to advertise a product .

I taught art for 40 years and to see anything hand lettered, or painted is a skill and art form that is being lost to modern technology ( perhaps it its already gone)  There is no computer generated plans to refer to, everything was hand drawn, painted with a brush. Even the lettering on the door of the truck was hand painted/lettered. That bottle they are working on appears three dimensional yet you know it is on a flat brick wall that has the irregular surface of the bricks and mortar joints to contend with.

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51 minutes ago, Walt G said:

I really enjoy and appreciate all these photos but especially the ones like this with artwork painted on the sides of buildings, barns, tops of hotels etc. to advertise a product .

I taught art for 40 years and to see anything hand lettered, or painted is a skill and art form that is being lost to modern technology ( perhaps it its already gone)  There is no computer generated plans to refer to, everything was hand drawn, painted with a brush. Even the lettering on the door of the truck was hand painted/lettered. 

 Hello Walt

Attached is a detail of the artwork on (formerly) my 1931 Chevy fire engine. Many detail photos were taken before the old paint was blasted off. A fairly young fellow recreated the gold leaf scrolls and striping. It's truly an art form to paint in the shading to get a three dimensional appearance. The original artist at Bickle Fire Engines in Woodstock, Ontario faced a problem when the new Imron paints came in. The gold leaf would fall off the glossy finish. He sliced a potato in half and slid the cut part of the spud along where the gold leaf was to be applied. The acid in the potato softened the paint just enough for the gold leaf to stick !

I asked the painter what the most difficult part of the job was. Interestingly,he said the hardest part was getting the stripes on the 20 inch disc wheels to line up when he had gone full circle.

Slides from carousels 1970's 033.JPG

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1 hour ago, Walt G said:

I really enjoy and appreciate all these photos but especially the ones like this with artwork painted on the sides of buildings, barns, tops of hotels etc. to advertise a product .

I taught art for 40 years and to see anything hand lettered, or painted is a skill and art form that is being lost to modern technology ( perhaps it its already gone)  There is no computer generated plans to refer to, everything was hand drawn, painted with a brush. Even the lettering on the door of the truck was hand painted/lettered. That bottle they are working on appears three dimensional yet you know it is on a flat brick wall that has the irregular surface of the bricks and mortar joints to contend with.

In my day, it was Letraset!

 

Craig

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2 hours ago, 58L-Y8 said:

Would you translate for those of us for whom high school French classes are too many decades past now...

 

If you ever want to translate a piece of foreign language - eg French -  just type 'translate French to English' in the search line of a new page, and it should come up with a couple of boxes for each language. Then all you do is copy and paste the section of text, et voila. I think sometimes it struggles with more technical stuff but you get the idea.

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27 minutes ago, Dave Gelinas (XP-300) said:

Not sure but here is the color version.

 

 

1937 Lincoln.jpg

Sunroof? Yes, its a one-off Derham sport sedan for an unidentified customer on the 1937 Lincoln K 136" wb chassis.

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Posted (edited)

One more on the Royals.

1950 Lincoln Cosmopolitan  Presidential Limousine  -  Bubble Top Parade Car  - Presidential Motorcade

President Eisenhower - Queen Elizabeth, Prince Philip - United States Visit - Washington DC  - October, 1957

 

 

18068753023_4dc4d0dd5b_b.jpg

Edited by Dave Gelinas (XP-300) (see edit history)
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Credit for this thread goes to all of you!   Not me.  I just have a lot of ideas ( to many) for looking and learning about history , stories that need to be shared all generated by the images we view and marvel at. I  felt that there had to be a few more like me beyond the dozen or so I knew were already as odd as I was. Even if you don't contribute because you don't have the resources or time to seek things - you are here looking at this, learning and having a good time. That is what old cars are all about. The comradeship , it's all good. 

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46 minutes ago, Walt G said:

Credit for this thread goes to all of you!   Not me.  I just have a lot of ideas ( to many) for looking and learning about history , stories that need to be shared all generated by the images we view and marvel at. I  felt that there had to be a few more like me beyond the dozen or so I knew were already as odd as I was. Even if you don't contribute because you don't have the resources or time to seek things - you are here looking at this, learning and having a good time. That is what old cars are all about. The comradeship , it's all good. 

No dodging the credit for coming up with one of the best threads I have ever seen.  Like all great leaders you passed the credit to the others. But we know....

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SHORPY-8c00898a.jpg?itok=jfnP3avS

Showtime in Chicago

SHORPY-8c03972a.jpg

November 1940. "The main square in Colchester, Connecticut."

 

SHORPY-8c04725a.jpg

March 1941. "Traffic on the main street of Fayetteville, North Carolina."

 

SHORPY-8c00261a.jpg

December 1940. "San Diego, California. Workers' automobiles parked near the airplane factories."

 

SHORPY-8b14858a.jpg?itok=ziayivsB

August 1942. Washington, D.C. "Corner store at 11th and P Streets N.W."

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A.J. we all need one of those gadgets you show that was in Omnia magazine for the annual get together at the BIG H. in October. What a great flea market piece of machinery, There is so much cool stuff in period magazines like Omnia that most are unaware of , and I am sure that many never heard of Omnia either !

And the period images and education continues on here , GREAT STUFF.  So many things that have not been seen since they were new 80+ years ago. It is refreshing to see new - old  stuff be brought to life again. All of this reinforces that AACA is one of the premier sources for automotive history at the touch of a button.

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Taken At The Gatsby Picnic.

Dunsmuir Estate.

Oakland, CA September, 2012

 

Check out the site. The gallery is a treat.

Gatsby Summer Afternoon

 

Rolls Royce @The Gatsby 2012.jpg

 

 

This one, (although not a period photo) really brought a smile to my face for a few minutes!

Not only did I instantly recognize the place? I KNOW and have ridden in that car!

It has been way too long since I have done the things I most enjoyed in my life. And those Gatsby Picnics were high on that list. I have been to probably ten or twelve of them, years ago. Always great fun. The whole atmosphere was wonderful! The music, the dancing, so many people putting out fancy era picnic displays. I still have my era tables and chairs (chair's patent dates are 1898!) And talk about incredible cars! Model Ts on up to Rolls Royce, and a bunch of them. Even a Stanley steamer went several times, and spent most of the day driving around giving rides to anyone wanting one (also a wonderful longtime good friend of mine!).

 

There I go, drifting again.

Thank you Walt, again, for a wonderful thread.

 

 

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As we approach the  80th anniversary of the evacuation of British and allied troops from Dunkirk in Operation  Dynamo this a 1939 Mercury was one of some 65,000 vehicles left in the towns, roads and beaches of northern France and Belgium. Orders were given destroy everything but thousands of captured cars and trucks were reconditioned by the Wehrmacht, most seeing service in Russia. This Mercury appears to carry British army markings and was less than one year old when destroyed, either in battle or by the British Army.  

1939 Mercury at Dunkirk.jpg

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I never heard of that chassis lubrication system but I did hear of the car it was fitted to. Here is an advertisement they took in the 1921 N.Y. Salon souvenir catalog.

This and the ad that A.J. has shared with all of us is the only two I have ever seen. There is a lot of incredibly great images and artwork that was printed in the 1914 to 1932 era especially in publications like the souvenir salon programs, periodicals like Motor Life and Motor Print ( which later merged into one magazine) , in Europe the Omnia magazine that A.J. was fortunate enough to recently purchase and I have a collection of as well. I have found that most collectors are not aware of certain material, and if you aren't aware of it you can't seek it out. There were a fair number of sales catalogs on American makes printed and published in France and England - Packard, Buick, Lincoln, Chrysler,  Franklin just to name a few and all totally unlike the stuff published here in the USA. The same goes for European cars sold here in the USA . I have sitting here in front of me a 1921-23 era b & w sales catalog printed in the USA by Walters & Mahon Inc. of N.Y. for Isotta Fraschini (!) for their USA agent for sales on West 44th Street in Manhattan . This will be used in a story I am currently working on for a new quarterly 144 page magazine that has appeared on the automotive scene.

Richealieu1921Saoloncatalog ad001.jpg

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4 minutes ago, Walt G said:

I never heard of that chassis lubrication system but I did hear of the car it was fitted to. Here is an advertisement they took in the 1921 N.Y. Salon souvenir catalog.

This and the ad that A.J. has shared with all of us is the only two I have ever seen. There is a lot of incredibly great images and artwork that was printed in the 1914 to 1932 era especially in publications like the souvenir salon programs, periodicals like Motor Life and Motor Print ( which later merged into one magazine) , in Europe the Omnia magazine that A.J. was fortunate enough to recently purchase and I have a collection of as well. I have found that most collectors are not aware of certain material, and if you aren't aware of it you can't seek it out. There were a fair number of sales catalogs on American makes printed and published in France and England - Packard, Buick, Lincoln, Chrysler,  Franklin just to name a few and all totally unlike the stuff published here in the USA.

 

Packard used a Bijur automatic lubricating system.

bijur.jpg

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