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Period images to relieve some of the stress


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A lot of Franklins have lions on their grille..........Come to think of it, this one does too! Now 48 years later I don't think I'd let her sit on my hood now.

 

 

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11 hours ago, 30DodgePanel said:

Unusual body with curved doors. 

Chevy special body type?

 

5ca5501ed090e689b025f01d4f98ef63.jpg

 

This was likely purchased from a dealer as a cowl and chassis, then sent to a local body builder to be fitted with the neat C cab panel delivery.

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Wayne, who doesn't like a good mystery?  Mysteries are to research, document, speculate, postulate, document; it keeps a person's mind involved in the subject matter.  I do like the complimentary fender and running board flow lines of the Maryland and the mystery car.  I do realize that it may only be a common feature and not the true identifying feature.  The general appearance of the mystery car kind of suggests an underslung but obviously it is not an underslung.  Nonetheless it does seem to have a "low rider" look about it that was common with the underslung cars.  In a way that I can't quite understand, mystery car has some design element of the 1907 Colt Runabout, although the fenders most resemble the Maryland.

 

Now this raised an case in point.  Are we confident the mystery car actually has a gasoline engine?  Notice that most of these early cars had several large levers that were involved with the drive train and brakes.  No such levers are evident on this mystery car.  The length of the hood of this car is remarkable for its length, and also the apparent fact that there is leakage of some fluid where the left-rear corner of the hood meets the cowl.  Also under the cowl there is apparent leakage of a fluid.  Is it possible this car is a steamer?  That could explain the length of the hood that would cover the steam engine and boiler.  The two passengers in the car could be sitting on a water tank.  Hence the apparent wet spots at the hood/cowl, and under the cowl/floor board could simply be leaking water.  ?

07 Colt ad.jpg

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Well, yeesh, your are correct.  It does have a crank handle; presumably that rules out the first and only hand cranked steam engine.  Ha.

 

I hear "Maryland my Maryland" playing in the background.

 

 

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On 1/30/2021 at 5:36 PM, edinmass said:

E6B07CC5-120A-40F5-BEF1-D7D011D064F3.png

The Singer Josephine Baker with a Delage. Body by Letourneur et Marchand.  There's another picture in a French magazine that identifies her and it's the same car, but this is a much better photo.  Note the center door handle.

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37 minutes ago, ply33 said:

I have to say that @Dave Gelinas (XP-300) has been posting a lot of incredibly good photos! Thanks!

I agree completely!  And they are not all Buicks either!!!   Thanks Dave...................

I just noticed we are at 320 pages and 275,000 views , I guess there are a few of us out here that like period photos and images - this has gone well beyond what I ever expected it would.  Many thanks again.

WG

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I won't start to post sales literature as that would change this format a bit, but did want to share this with you. It is a sales flyer from the inside of a sales catalog ( folder was an addition for the motor show) in 1931 for WYLDER & Co. Coachbuilders of Kew Gardens in Surrey , England. They show their coachwork on a British Talbot chassis. There are 14 pages in the actual catalog with some fantastic bodies on an assortment of chassis. Many styles from town cars and open tourers to a club sedan that is a exact duplicate of a V16 Marmon that was current at that year in the USA.

iWylderCoachbuilder1931.jpg

iWyldereTalbotconv1931.jpg

4 minutes ago, HK500 said:

What city?  What streetcorner? and which series custom coachbuilder's work can be just barely seen in the window?

MadduxLincolnHollywood2_000143.jpg

Maddox was the Lincoln dealer in California and the location is most likely Los Angeles. To dark for me to tell what the coach builder was but a look at the Custom Body Salon program of that era may give a clue, I will look later to see if it does and report what I may find if anything.

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Dave thanks for the photos and if you have an extra one of those Oscar Mayer delivery vans laying around I'll take it. 😁

 

 

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52 minutes ago, HK500 said:

What city?  What streetcorner? and which series custom coachbuilder's work can be just barely seen in the window?

MadduxLincolnHollywood2_000143.jpg

1928-'30 Lincoln L quarter-window convertible victoria by Dietrich, appears to be Style 181

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4 hours ago, ply33 said:

I have to say that @Dave Gelinas (XP-300) has been posting a lot of incredibly good photos! Thanks!

 

4 hours ago, Walt G said:

I agree completely!  And they are not all Buicks either!!!   Thanks Dave...................

I just noticed we are at 320 pages and 275,000 views , I guess there are a few of us out here that like period photos and images - this has gone well beyond what I ever expected it would.  Many thanks again.

WG

Thanks guys your the best.

B&W 1930's DeLux Ice Cream Truckj.jpeg

B&W 1938 Ice Cream Truck.jpg

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Kurt, wow thanks for sharing those, I Love that Auburn dealership in the first photo. Do you know if that building still exists?

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The New York City Rolls-Royce dealership in the mid to late 1920s would have sales flyers/folders printed of cars that were for sale that they took in on trade on a Rolls-Royce. All kinds of cars, besides R-R as can be seen here in a partial view of the sales folder . Would be an interesting article to cover the R-R and Packard used car sales in the 1927 to 1935 era in New York City that I have material on.

USEDcarsalesRRinNY.jpg

USEDcarsRRsale.jpg

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ca. 1906. A small crowd scattered on the sidewalk pauses to admire a fleet of new Fords lined up outside the Washington Automobile Co., 710-12 Pacific Ave., circa 1906. The Washington Automobile Co. was the first car dealership in Tacoma.

 

Kurt M.

Tacoma WA

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28 minutes ago, alsancle said:

DoodleBug.jpg

 

 

This is how millions of young people started out in the car hobby back in the day......an off brand doodlebug.

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The Car and Mascot are obvious.  The location isn't readily identifiable to me.  Google of Thames and Paris bridges don't come up with matches, and the photo hasn't been on Google either. My guess is the UK based on the mascot and possible source of the photo. 

BugattiType55_000155.jpg

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This looks to me like the Duesenberg Weymann Tapertail J437.   Based on where the photo was found and the Kodak Velox paper, likely taken at some car meet in the 1950's.  Auburn maybe?   You know, that car probably didn't get much attention, they had to add a big arrow stripe along the body accent line to make it stand out a little more !

DuesenbergSpeedster_000154.jpg

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1 hour ago, HK500 said:

The Car and Mascot are obvious.  The location isn't readily identifiable to me.  Google of Thames and Paris bridges don't come up with matches, and the photo hasn't been on Google either. My guess is the UK based on the mascot and possible source of the photo. 

Looks like Putney Bridge A316 into London to me it’s just before Chelsea , just a guess it is similar 

 

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13 hours ago, HK500 said:

The Car and Mascot are obvious.  The location isn't readily identifiable to me.  Google of Thames and Paris bridges don't come up with matches, and the photo hasn't been on Google either. My guess is the UK based on the mascot and possible source of the photo. 

BugattiType55_000155.jpg

 

I agree it's probably in the UK but Putney Bridge doesn't have semi-circular "bastions" between the arches. It certainly looks familiar though.

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This is two pages from a 1921 catalog that is 15 pages long and issued by Disteel "the safe wheel" . The wheels were made by the Detroit Pressed Steel Company, and as can be seen from the list were available for many makes of cars. The main claim by the company was the safety of a steel wheel over a wood spoke wheel and examples were shown of how a wood wheel would collapse and break apart in an encounter with an object . I thought it would be interesting to not only see the photos but also the list of cars.

Disteelwheel1922TWO.jpg

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On 4/27/2021 at 6:34 PM, HK500 said:

This looks to me like the Duesenberg Weymann Tapertail J437.   Based on where the photo was found and the Kodak Velox paper, likely taken at some car meet in the 1950's.  Auburn maybe?   You know, that car probably didn't get much attention, they had to add a big arrow stripe along the body accent line to make it stand out a little more !

DuesenbergSpeedster_000154.jpg

"A former owner in the early Fifties tried out a novel decorating scheme on this car. The cutaway fenders were an even earlier redo".

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Walt, thank you for the advertisement page for the Disteel wheels.  The idea of a steel wheel versus a wood spoke wheel was not new in the 1920s.  A November 1, 1907 article (page 228) in the Cycle and Automobile Trade Journal provided information about the Indestructible Steel Wheel Company, of Chicago.  The article mentioned that a Premier roadster automobile was driven on a promotional trip through Indiana, Ohio and Michigan demonstrating the new open pattern of their steel wheel.  The article said that many factories placed orders for the wheels for their 1908 output of cars.  The inference is that the Indestructible Wheel Company had already be in production of a solid steel version of their wheel since because open pattern was new.

 

Advertising for the Indestructible Steel Wheel shows a small car with the steel wheels going down a steep ramp, launching and flipping in the air to presumably safely land.  The demonstration vehicle was called "The Somersault Automobile."

 

Another steel wheel manufacturer was Gler-Lewis, who advertised their wheel in The Automobile, February 2, 1922, page 216.  I have no photographs actually showing Indestructible Steel Wheels nor Gler-Lewis metal disk wheels on any cars.  I do have a number of photos of the Disteel wheels.

 

Indestructible Steel Wheel 02.JPG

Indestructible Steel Wheel 05.JPG

Indestructible Steel Wheel 03.JPG

Gler-Lewis metal disk wheel The Automobile 2-2-1922 P216.JPG

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I'm as interested in the backgrounds as I am in the cars themselves.  It would be nice if the posters would include location information, if known, so that we could all check the accuracy of our guesses.  Keep up the good work.

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