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Period images to relieve some of the stress


Walt G

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2 hours ago, GARY F said:

I don't get it yet. I think it is a nice looking Olds.

 

It is.   My point was you can't find that car anymore.   It was restored out of existence in the 70s and 80s.

 

I think I'm going to start a thread challenge for someone to find me a picture of basically the same car but taken now.

 

 

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19 minutes ago, LCK81403 said:

Lots of red 47 Olds, but there are others.

47 Oldsmobile 98 convert.jpg

47 Oldsmobile 98 Custom Cruiser.jpg

47 Oldsmobile convert.jpg

47 Oldsmobile Series 88 convert.jpg

 

I don't want to ruin Walt's thread,  but you made my point.  None of those cars look anything like the period picture.  

 

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In addition to the after market enhancements put on this fine motor car, what is with the tires?  The tread pattern is U.S. military, as seen on Jeeps and up to 1 1/2 ton utility vehicles.  We had an old Army ambulance having tires with that very same U.S. government approved, military tread pattern.

 

CircusWagon.jpg.fc1a182ef49a67e88b4c95a8b91c9ae7.jpg

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On 4/12/2021 at 6:57 PM, LCK81403 said:

Lots of red 47 Olds, but there are others.

47 Oldsmobile 98 convert.jpg

47 Oldsmobile 98 Custom Cruiser.jpg

47 Oldsmobile convert.jpg

47 Oldsmobile Series 88 convert.jpg

The Blue was the same color that my fathers 1948 2dr was. He sold it to my grandfather who had it until about 1960. I vaguely remember riding in it with him driving. By then the Blue had faded and dulled. It did have red wheels.

 One of my first attempts at buying an older car back in 1971 was in the form of a 1947 Olds 98 convertible stored in a garage not run for over 14 years. Owned by a local old car collector who had old cars stored all over various properties around Monongahela PA. It was a medium green metalic, low miles under 35,000.  Hydramatic with the same fender skirts, leather, power windows, nice untorn black top. Also.... 4 flat tires. My father liked it because he was always an Oldsmobile man. But he thought the $800 the collector wanted for the not running car was outrageous!

 I would like to know where all these cars ended up..

Edited by dibarlaw
spelling (see edit history)
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10 hours ago, LCK81403 said:

In addition to the after market enhancements put on this fine motor car, what is with the tires?  The tread pattern is U.S. military, as seen on Jeeps and up to 1 1/2 ton utility vehicles.  We had an old Army ambulance having tires with that very same U.S. government approved, military tread pattern.

 

CircusWagon.jpg.fc1a182ef49a67e88b4c95a8b91c9ae7.jpg

Is it possible that the photo was taken in the Philippines?  A lot of material was left there after WWII.

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Can anyone identify my grandfather's truck?  Behind the truck his steam engine is running on a belt to the Red River Special threshing machine.  Presumably it is the same truck that he removed the water tank used to service the steam engine and replaced it with a "camping" box-body.  Possibly a Ford TT?  There is a deer with a serious rack of antlers on the left fender.

Threshing.jpg

Deer on fender.jpg

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Yes, ford TT truck, probably 1920 or '21 based upon low radiator and styles of starting crank, headlamp lenses and wheel sizes and types. First photo shows brackets for a Prestolite tank (acetylene gas) down by the running board. Second photo shows the acetylene lamps mounted on the firewall. Very unusual for a vehicle that late that has electric headlamps. Possibly for working late into the night and lighting up the work area.

Very unusual body for a TT. It should be noted that Ford did not supply bodies for the TT until the 1924 model year. Before that, bodies were supplied by after-market truck body builders, chassis owners using second-hand bodies (very common to use discarded earlier runabout bodies!) or building their own crude bodies (sometimes literally fence boards!).

It should also be noted that some non-Ford heavy duty trucks continued to use acetylene gas headlamps until the late 1920s! Prestolite tanks continued to be readily available well into the 1970s, and in some states can still be found available at welding supply stores (unfortunately not in Califunny because I sure would like to pick up a few of them that way!!)

 

Forgot to mention, it has a Peerless after-market radiator. (Not related to the Peerless automobile.)

Edited by wayne sheldon
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10 hours ago, LCK81403 said:

Can anyone identify my grandfather's truck?  Behind the truck his steam engine is running on a belt to the Red River Special threshing machine.  Presumably it is the same truck that he removed the water tank used to service the steam engine and replaced it with a "camping" box-body.  Possibly a Ford TT?  There is a deer with a serious rack of antlers on the left fender.

Threshing.jpg

Deer on fender.jpg

That picture with the thresher is priceless!  I have seen those big steamers running at shows but to see a 'real life' picture of one in action is awsome. Thank You for posting this.

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2 minutes ago, TAKerry said:

That picture with the thresher is priceless!  I have seen those big steamers running at shows but to see a 'real life' picture of one in action is awsome. Thank You for posting this.

 

This.  Would love to see more pictures of the steamer

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I try to get to the threshermans reunion late summer in Ronks PA. They have a fantastic steam museum there. To see these beasts in action is incredible. I would recommend to anyone that has not witnessed it in person to do so at least once. My late father grew up on a farm in the 30's, and he would tell us all about the old stuff that was used 'in his day'.

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Wayne, thank you for the information about my grandfather's Ford TT truck.  The steam engine was used for harvest / threshing season and the rest of the time he used it in either the sawmill at town or for the mobile saw rig he took out to farm properties.  It was a 23 horsepower steam engine, which doesn't sound like much but it was 23 horse at the drawbar.  The power of the machine was amazing with steel lugs bolted to the drive wheels.  The attached photo is one of his two Minneapolis gas tractors that was also used for threshing season and he is again running the Minnie on a belt with the 38-32 Red River Special thresher.  I was a grandson and unpaid helper with the threshing operations.  Somewhere I have a photo of him moving a house with the steam engine; it's quite a photo.

 

The deer on the fender of that Ford TT is shown in the attached photo.  The rifle is a Winchester caliber .32-40.  Can you identify the car, seen through the tree branches?  I can't begin to guesstimate what it is.  That's my dad on the small steamer at the home place, running a bucksaw to cut up fire wood.  Slab wood would be brought form the saw mill and "bucked" into fire wood at home.

Minneapolis gas tractor and Red River Special threshing machine - Copy.jpg

Grandpas deer 1931 - Copy.jpg

Home place - Copy.jpg

My dad with a broken arm in front of a Chevrolet.  Also a photo of dad when he was trapping muskrats; the truck is unidentified.

 

Dad broken arm Chevrolet - Copy.jpg

Dad muskrat trapper.jpg

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1 hour ago, alsancle said:


is that from a magazine?

My friend Jim took the picture when he owned it. Picture was in frame when he gave it to me. Before arriving in Chicago the car came of of Ireland and was owned by a man named Desmond Fitzgerald. In later years this car was painted bright red and given whitewalls and chrome wires wheels.

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