Jump to content

Period images to relieve some of the stress


Recommended Posts

You are welcome!  Although their Derham files are incomplete as documentation was somewhat dispersed through carelessness, its still unusually good with much interesting material. 

Link to post
Share on other sites
19 hours ago, alsancle said:

HispanoMaybe.jpg

This one has the stork to give it away easily.  You don't see Chauffeur driven 2 passenger cars to often.

HispanoSuiza.jpg

I am guessing , but although I do not know the coach builder for the Hispano uUiza, I think the location for the photograph as well as for the one for the Sunbeam race car is at the Brooklands auto race track in Weybridge, Surrey, England. . I have been to that rack several times for the Brooklands Society annual reunions and the banked poured concrete track surface in the back ground is what is telling me where it is as well as the pedestrian bridges built over the raceway.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
4 hours ago, Walt G said:

I am guessing , but although I do not know the coach builder for the Hispano uUiza, I think the location for the photograph as well as for the one for the Sunbeam race car is at the Brooklands auto race track in Weybridge, Surrey, England. . I have been to that rack several times for the Brooklands Society annual reunions and the banked poured concrete track surface in the back ground is what is telling me where it is as well as the pedestrian bridges built over the raceway.

 

I am not so sure about that photo of the Hisso being at Brooklands.

 

From looking at the circuit in an aerial photo there don't seem to be any more footbridges other than the well known one. I don't know that for certain though.

 

See the source image

 

The structure of the bridge in the bridge in the Hisso photo is different. 

 

I was there on a wet day in February 2014 and took this one.

 

image.png

 

Notice the ends of the bridge sides are 'angled'. whereas in the Hisso photo they are straight up.

 

Another shot from back in the day.

 

See the source image

Link to post
Share on other sites
13 hours ago, nzcarnerd said:

 

I am not so sure about that photo of the Hisso being at Brooklands.

 

From looking at the circuit in an aerial photo there don't seem to be any more footbridges other than the well known one. I don't know that for certain though.

 

See the source image

 

The structure of the bridge in the bridge in the Hisso photo is different. 

 

I was there on a wet day in February 2014 and took this one.

 

image.png

 

Notice the ends of the bridge sides are 'angled'. whereas in the Hisso photo they are straight up.

 

Another shot from back in the day.

 

See the source image

 

Link to post
Share on other sites
On 4/4/2021 at 2:11 PM, 58L-Y8 said:

Chrome-plated side-mount covers AND Fenders too!!!

Don't forget fender lights and cowl lights too.  Plus, it looks like the sun visor over the windshield is chrome plated!  And purists complain about people today over chrome plating their antique cars.

 

Capt. Harley😉

Link to post
Share on other sites

From what I see on the diagram of the track, there are several bridges. Also, if you look at the construction photo you will see men on the bridge showing that it's more than just a foot bridge. The square end foot bridge must be somewhere else on the track. Maybe in the paddock area. Please forgive my previous post with quote, I hit the button before I added my comment.

 

Bill

Brooklands bridge.jpg

Brooklands circuit.png

Edited by hook
left out (see edit history)
Link to post
Share on other sites
On 4/4/2021 at 3:38 PM, John_Mereness said:

168366117_10159665201752189_1131890092039307610_n.jpg

A '29 Packard 640 roadster with a running board spotlight.  Instead of the stock factory supplied CM Hall spotlight mounted on the left windshield stanchion bracket.

There is something about running board spotlights that just get to me!🤩  I've got two of them:  one in my bedroom and one in the living room.🤪  The car and the light are just pure class!

Link to post
Share on other sites
On 4/4/2021 at 3:40 PM, John_Mereness said:

165887503_10159665192502189_2854201747061073075_n.jpg

 

I like photos like this. Someone had a ridiculous idea and they did it, but by virtue of wearing suits, ties, and hats all the time, they still look like very serious people. This is completely silly but with those two guys there, I would totally believe they're doing something important and not foolish.

 

Dress for success indeed.

  • Like 2
  • Haha 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

The roadster is a 1929 series 645 and has a Rollston body, not the factory catalog coachwork.  History of the Rollston/Rollson Company is in issue #1 of the new Crankshaft magazine and shows this car as well as many other cars that have the bodies built by that company that was located on the west side of New York City . It's final location was at 601 West 47th Street, the same building today is home to Toyota of Manhattan. Rudy Creteur who was the head of Rollston was a great guy, excellent memory of what he built and for who in the pre war era. He and Austin Clark and I used to go out to lunch on a regular basis - oh the stories that Rudy could tell about some of the customers !  Priceless.

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites
3 minutes ago, Matt Harwood said:

 

I like photos like this. Someone had a ridiculous idea and they did it, but by virtue of wearing suits, ties, and hats all the time, they still look like very serious people. This is completely silly but with those two guys there, I would totally believe they're doing something important and not foolish.

 

Dress for success indeed.

I believe that was considered 'proper' attire at the time, even during some recreational activities.  In school, there was a dress code in place, and when one looks at period street photos from the era, almost everyone is dressed up by today's standards.

 

Craig

  • Like 3
Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, 8E45E said:

I believe that was considered 'proper' attire at the time, even during some recreational activities.

I'm always fascinated by the old photos of the early club meets in the 1940's and 50's. Young men wearing a tie and jacket on a weekend for a vintage car club outing seems other worldly but it was only a generation ago.

  • Like 3
Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Walt G said:

The roadster is a 1929 series 645 and has a Rollston body, not the factory catalog coachwork.  History of the Rollston/Rollson Company is in issue #1 of the new Crankshaft magazine and shows this car as well as many other cars that have the bodies built by that company that was located on the west side of New York City . It's final location was at 601 West 47th Street, the same building today is home to Toyota of Manhattan. Rudy Creteur who was the head of Rollston was a great guy, excellent memory of what he built and for who in the pre war era. He and Austin Clark and I used to go out to lunch on a regular basis - oh the stories that Rudy could tell about some of the customers !  Priceless.

 

My first thought when I saw the picture was that it was this car.

 

 

29-Packard-645-Deluxe8_DV-15-PBC_t011-800.jpg

  • Like 3
Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, md murray said:

I'm always fascinated by the old photos of the early club meets in the 1940's and 50's. Young men wearing a tie and jacket on a weekend for a vintage car club outing seems other worldly but it was only a generation ago.

There is a nice video here of the 1962 AACA meet, where one also sees the same.  It was in the late 1960's when much of the younger people decided to 'dress down' for school, and other not-so-formal events which didn't enforce a dress code.

 

Craig

Link to post
Share on other sites
9 hours ago, Dave Gelinas (XP-300) said:

Here's the other photo.

Their slacks are as long as the car.

s-l1600.jpg

 

Thanks.   I would assume dad in the middle.

 

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, alsancle said:

 

Thanks.   I would assume dad in the middle.

 

 

Maybe Dad's dad was tall?

 

My ex-wife's father was only about 5' 8' but his two sons are both 6' 6" plus. Their grandfather, born 1907, was very tall - about 6 3". 

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

On July 4, 1921, at 2:30 in the afternoon, the flag dropped starting the 10th annual Tacoma Speedway Classic. Nine drivers had entered the 250 mile race. It was driven on Tacoma's infamous board track and had a purse of $25,000, to be divided nine ways. On the right is the pace car, a Marmon Speedster, carrying referee Eddie Rickenbacker and pace maker Ray Harroun. The car would pace the drivers for one lap before the race actually took off. Rickenbacker was a former star of the race track and a famous ace of the air and Harroun was also a veteran driver. Harroun was a last minute replacement for Louis Chevrolet. The car on the left of the pace car is #6, the Duesenberg driven by Roscoe Sarles. Sarles had earned the pole position by driving at the top speed of 101 mph during the trials. The race was won by favorite Tommy Milton. Milton broke all speed records for distance with his average speed of 98 mph.

race.png

  • Like 3
Link to post
Share on other sites
On 4/25/2020 at 11:32 AM, Gary_Ash said:

The giant wooden model of the 1931 Studebaker roadster.  It lasted for many years but eventually was burned by the company as it got too outdated.  Also, a modern Zippy cartoon of the car. from December 2004.  There is a video available of the Studebaker band playing music from the car, though I can't find it today.

 

31giant_roadster_sm.thumb.jpg.777245b2dcfea5e90d03c78509107a95.jpg

 

Zippy_31Stude_122204_color.gif.eaf2ecf6e75df25f22323bc9d96ad8fc.gif

 

As consolation, here is one old video of the car:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3muLAOy_lDk.

 

 

 

Link to post
Share on other sites

Judging by the lack of radiator and the shape of that timing case my guess is this is powered by a Henderson 4 cylinder motorcycle motor.

 

Howard Dennis 

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites
On 4/7/2021 at 5:33 PM, alsancle said:

This picture is from the 1950s.  If this car made it to the 70s and was restored it would be a bright embarrassment today.

Oldsmobile.jpg

Please enlighten as to why this car would be an embarrassment today?  I admit to not recognizing it.  Thsnk you.

Link to post
Share on other sites
19 minutes ago, plymouthcranbrook said:

Please enlighten as to why this car would be an embarrassment today?  I admit to not recognizing it.  Thsnk you.

 

The car as pictured is pure awesomeness.   But if it was restored anytime between 1965 and 1995 it would look like this.

CircusWagon.jpg

  • Haha 2
Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
×
×
  • Create New...