Jump to content

Period images to relieve some of the stress


Recommended Posts

5 hours ago, alsancle said:

Help me out here.  Buick?  Attractive sedan whatever it is.

BuickMaybe.jpg

A 1946-'47 Oldsmobile Custom Cruiser Ninety Series (98 Series).  The same GM C-Bpdies shared with Buick Super and Roadmaster and Cadillac Series 62.

  • Like 1
  • Thanks 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

One additional Ford of France image and I will be done for a few days , have to look some Lincoln stuff up to possibly go with a story a friend did for the 100th anniversary of that make. Happy Easter everyone.

FORDFrance193001.jpg

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
10 minutes ago, Walt G said:

Happy Easter everyone.

Same to you, Walt.

 

Very nice photo.  Just wish I could have shown it to my late mother Simone.  She was a war bride from Marseille and was a nurse in WWII.  Her father imported the first Ford model T's to Algiers.  He died fighting in the French Resistance.

 

Regards,

 

Peter.

  • Like 1
  • Thanks 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
7 hours ago, Walt G said:

 

AUTPOPoloassnphoto001.jpg

 

This is an interesting photo. I have played with era cameras, and studied some about the long history of photography (another of my many dozens of interests), however, I know enough about photographic history to know that I have BARELY scratched the surface! Just not enough time in the years to devote to so many things.

Auto-Polo photographs are scattered all over the internet. However, they are usually the same dozen or so that get copied and shared over and over again. This one? I am fairly certain I have seen this one before, however it was several years ago.

What makes this one so interesting, is that this one MIGHT be an actual action shot? But I am not sure about it. Most of the commonly seen model T Polo photos were staged. They have been discussed at length numerous times. There are tell-tale signs of old-fashioned 'photo-shop' hiding blocks of wood and jacks holding the cars in position while the 'players' would pose for the camera. Several of the best known pictures would set the scene, someone would give the ready, set, GO, so the cameraman and 'players' would spin a wheel or two, then leap into the air for the cameraman to capture the 'action'! Interesting stuff to dissect old photos. There are also a few of the commonly seen pictures that are actual action shots.

Part of what is interesting about this photo, is that most photographic mediums of those days used rather slow types of film. An actual action shot on something moving like this will usually have blurry areas. I would expect the men flying through the air to not show clearly. That is what is seen on a few of the commonly seen action shots. Faster moving areas of the rolling car, the ball, the player falling onto the ground, are usually blurred a bit. However, there were some  higher speed film mediums even then. And they were often used photographing racing cars back then. So I would expect that may be what was done here.

 

Auto-Polo was played for many years, and model T Fords were usually the car of choice as they were common and cheap. Fifty years ago, just South of San Francisco, there was a theatre that was run by some film association (the theatre had been built in the late 1920s). Usually, Friday nights were historic films, and usually it was good stuff. I and my group of friends went often to watch silent movies and listen to the Mighty Wurlitzer played often by world renowned organists. We also sometimes saw movies like "The Big Sleep" and "Casablanca" both with Humphry Bogart. The theatre also played short features including Movietone Newreels. One night, the Newsreel was a 1948 release showing an effort to bring back Auto-Polo as a 'back to normalization' after World War two. The cars used? A bunch of Auto-Polo model T Fords that had been kept from before the war. It was fun watching the sport actually being played live on film!

  • Like 3
  • Thanks 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Wayne, thanks so much for your observations and comments! The field that this would have taken place is east of NY City about 35 miles. Lots of photo studios, movie studios etc ( in Manhattan, Brooklyn, Queens Counties) so perhaps the latest equipment available was in use? Not making a statement as to that is what happened but just a theory what could have been possible. Perhaps this image was taken from some movie film? The people who were involved with the polo association ( at least this one ) were connected to $ociety - Rodman Wannamaker among them ( of the Department store chain, Wannamaker liked high end cars too, owned the first Locomobile dual cowl phaeton built on a model 48 chassis)

Walt

 

  • Thanks 2
Link to post
Share on other sites
On 4/3/2021 at 9:41 AM, Walt G said:

To get back to some black & white earlier images/photographs here is two more images from the ca. 1928 Rolls Royce of New York used car folder , plus the Ford model T chassis and flying passengers is of the APAA Auto-Polo Association of America. This was from their program for 1913 ( it was founded in 1913). They had a field on Stewart Avenue in Garden City, N.Y. where they would play polo but rather then use a horse used a car with a roll cage ( literally, if they rolled over it prevented them from being crushed)

President was Hicks Arnold Weatherbee ( any relation Mark?) and on the "Board of Control" was racer Harry Harkness.

More "different" stuff from my library /archives. The program for the event that took place on July 4 and 5 , 1913 has some really interesting advertisement that set the attitude and pace of that era just before WWI. Access to long island was not via the several bridges that are now taken for granted, they were not there. Main advertised access was via the Ferry for Autos Across Long Island Sound between Rye and Sea Cliff, N.Y. ( Rye was in Westchester County north of NY City and Sea Cliff was and is on the north shore of long island near Glen Cove. )

 

RR TILBURYmayfair.jpg

AUTPOPoloassnphoto001.jpg

AutoPOLOprogram cover001.jpg

AutoPOLOprogramPag10005.jpg

Walt, I recall eons ago in maybe 1988- ish, period (I joined in 1989 and prior was reading eveyone elses CCCA) reading a friends CCCA Bulletin with an article about Auto Polo and some CCCA era photos - any change you may have more photos to post or .... ?  I would love to reread that article too. 

Link to post
Share on other sites
17 hours ago, wayne sheldon said:

What makes this one so interesting, is that this one MIGHT be an actual action shot? But I am not sure about it. Most of the commonly seen model T Polo photos were staged. They have been discussed at length numerous times. There are tell-tale signs of old-fashioned 'photo-shop' hiding blocks of wood and jacks holding the cars in position while the 'players' would pose for the camera. Several of the best known pictures would set the scene, someone would give the ready, set, GO, so the cameraman and 'players' would spin a wheel or two, then leap into the air for the cameraman to capture the 'action'! Interesting stuff to dissect old photos. There are also a few of the commonly seen pictures that are actual action shots.

Part of what is interesting about this photo, is that most photographic mediums of those days used rather slow types of film. An actual action shot on something moving like this will usually have blurry areas. I would expect the men flying through the air to not show clearly. That is what is seen on a few of the commonly seen action shots. Faster moving areas of the rolling car, the ball, the player falling onto the ground, are usually blurred a bit. However, there were some  higher speed film mediums even then. And they were often used photographing racing cars back then. So I would expect that may be what was done here.

Making movies from fast-moving vehicles that abruptly stopped, reversed, switched direction, and rolled over once in a while was an exercise in futility with the filming equipment on hand at the time.   The movie cameras were big, bulky, had to be kept sealed from light at all times, the bulb was fragile, and to keep the undeveloped film rolling at a constant 1:24 frame speed per second in those conditions would have made it near-impossible to attain good, clear footage, unlike with today's digital technology with no moving parts on the camera itself.  Only in the last 15-20 have we seen acceptably clear real live on-board action videos race cars on the track. 

 

Craig

Edited by 8E45E (see edit history)
Link to post
Share on other sites
On 4/1/2021 at 8:17 AM, alsancle said:

I told my wife I was putting down a narrow gauge train track around the perimeter of the yard for a small steam train.   It really will make her swallowing my next car boondoggle a lot easier.

171_1_orig.jpg

14572012-10153847914507513-1196727222-o_orig.jpg

22686573-1473963989390213-1578301527-n_orig.jpg

65310960-651381298664319-1133358740322385920-n.jpg

Now we are talking - Dad is an avid a model railroader and always as avid train enthusiast as they come (I have gone out to see pretty much everything imaginable in trains) - an early employer (a really cool guy named Richard "Dick" Fullerton who ran the Kelly Johnson skunkworks projects for the Foreign Technology Division at WPAFB ) was a model train nut and it stuck - "you have to have a hobby that involves scale and your hands when you spend the day doing military projects figuring out how to blow people up." 

  • Like 3
Link to post
Share on other sites
30 minutes ago, John_Mereness said:

Walt, I recall eons ago in maybe 1988- ish, period (I joined in 1989 and prior was reading eveyone elses CCCA) reading a friends CCCA Bulletin with an article about Auto Polo and some CCCA era photos - any change you may have more photos to post or .... ?  I would love to reread that article too. 

Hey John, The only information/photos I have on the car Polo matches is the local one mentioned in Garden City, NY here on long island. I am not aware of any later games like that that took place after WWI as the cars became bulkier so far as fenders and bodies are concerned even the open ones. As far as I am aware of Ford model T was what was used as a base since parts were so plentiful and thus cheap to buy , and easy to get locally. There may have possibly been some auto polo games in the Philadelphia area but I can't put my hands on any information of that era about that and the only thing I have in the folder in my files is all about the games I mentioned. CCCA article ??  Can the national CCCA offices/library give you access to the article you recall?? who knows,  if they would want to bother or even if they have scans of the Bulletins from that era.

Link to post
Share on other sites
21 minutes ago, Walt G said:

Hey John, The only information/photos I have on the car Polo matches is the local one mentioned in Garden City, NY here on long island. I am not aware of any later games like that that took place after WWI as the cars became bulkier so far as fenders and bodies are concerned even the open ones. As far as I am aware of Ford model T was what was used as a base since parts were so plentiful and thus cheap to buy , and easy to get locally. There may have possibly been some auto polo games in the Philadelphia area but I can't put my hands on any information of that era about that and the only thing I have in the folder in my files is all about the games I mentioned. CCCA article ??  Can the national CCCA offices/library give you access to the article you recall?? who knows,  if they would want to bother or even if they have scans of the Bulletins from that era.

Walt, I recall an article in a CCCA Bulletin (the black and white paper printed supplements to the more quarterly publication) via late 1980's - there were photos of mid to late 20's CCCA cars.  I have tried to research and have found nothing on internet.  I joined in I believe 1989 (when I started law school) and saw it in a bulletin from Charles Koch somewhere in relation to the 1989, time frame or within a year or so prior. 

Edited by John_Mereness (see edit history)
Link to post
Share on other sites

Craig, I agree about the movie cameras of that era ( early teens) being huge to deal with. I am guessing that the photos taken of the match used in the Auto Polo Association booklet were done from a camera mounted on a tripod on the ground, not anything attached to the car or hand held by someone. The image I provided is definitely taken from a land based camera just judging from the level of perspective. There is another image full page in the program but it is highly retouched , so I am making a judgement call thinking that it was done so to allow it to be full size page 7 x 10 inches. The one I show here is without doubt untouched and only 3 1/2 x 5 1/2.

Link to post
Share on other sites

1928 Lincoln L with  unknown French coachwork. Suggestions are Binder, Franay or Saoutchik. The licence plate can be dated to Paris, 1928.

The car has a full set of Grebel lamps and disc wheels (Michelin?) The photo was found by me at a Paris flea market.

French 1 001 (2).jpg

French 2 001 (2).jpg

  • Like 7
  • Thanks 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

OK guys, it has been 23 hours since I contributed the image of the 1933 Ford in France , and no one has mentioned the headlamps - look inside past the lens on the car, does it look different? Stop gazing at your Easter basket 🤪 and tell me what is different? Are they stock Ford factory headlamps? are they European? or are they a combination of both?

This whole thread to me is about making you think , observe ...................... yes, the historian and former teacher in me is still very much active and well , even on the annual country wide "bunny" day.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
×
×
  • Create New...