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Period images to relieve some of the stress


Walt G

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Walt, I believe this Packard panel is what you referred to.  1st photo is a good view of the Packard, the 2nd photo is a Packard panel body that appeared several pages back.  That particular panel body photo was identified as a body for a '37 Packard Model 115 chassis.  That photo of the body was kind of dark so I put it into photoshop and cropped it to cut down on the amount of background white light, then increased the lightness to bring out more of the detail on the dark panel body.  And it indeed looks like the body for the Packard, unless there was more than one of the Packard panel trucks.  

Packard panel 01-02.jpg

Packard panel 02-02 37 Packard Model 115 chassis.jpg

Packard panel 02-02 37 Packard Model 115 chassis - Copy.jpg

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Thank you, it is the same vehicle in all the photographs. I really appreciate you taking the time and effort to do this. Now if someone can tell us that the real thing survives it would be just so neat to hear.

The original 8 x 10 photo was fairly dark to start with.

It just makes my day ( week, month etc) to put an existing vehicle with a photo of the same machine taken when it was new. I was able to do that many years ago with a 1934 Lincoln convertible victoria with body by Brunn I had numerous period photos of. Turned out the car was in northern California and the fellow that owned it was in a national car club I belonged to at the time. I found out and made 8 x 10 prints of what I had ( exterior, interior etc) and last I knew they were on display on a wall behind the car in the fellows collection. That to me is what it is all about. I have a buddy in England that has a Ford Model TT truck that I had the period coach builders photo catalog on and his truck was in that album , that page now resides with the truck which is where it should be ( and yes I had a ride in that truck when in England). My friend has contributed some amazing and outstanding period photographs to this thread for all of us to see.

Walt

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38 minutes ago, Dave Gelinas (XP-300) said:

1-Buick Dealership.jpg


 

The Cadillac sign in this photo today would sell for over 50k. Great shot. 👍

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When I was a kid in the mid to late 70s we had a go kart shop in town.  It was like a candy store.   Up front he had two karts for sale and one of them was a lay down like this with dual tanks.   To me it was the coolest thing in the world.     Pretty soon I would graduate to other things I thought were cooler,  but at that point this was it.

 

Imagine a store front retail shop that only sells GoKart parts?   Those were the days.

LayDownKart.jpg

Edited by alsancle (see edit history)
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I told my wife I was putting down a narrow gauge train track around the perimeter of the yard for a small steam train.   It really will make her swallowing my next car boondoggle a lot easier.

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13 hours ago, Dave Gelinas (XP-300) said:

2- Buick Dealership.JPG

Dave: Thanks for this one showing a 1925 Model 51 Brougham in the show room with TUARC disk wheels. Also the other imagaes with the 1937 and 1938 front ends.

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More cars for sale in the ca. 1928 Rolls Royce NY  Dealership as used cars traded in on new R-R. I love that deluxe bus, could have your own regional PAS meeting with most of the region membership attending in one car!  I wonder what "executive of a large steel company" had this made for use between his estates, where were the estates? All these images raise other questions that will be the subject of another story, more history. I have way to much stuff - haven't even looked at the issues of OMNIA magazine ( French car publication on excellent coated stock paper that was published between 1920 and 1936 once a month - I have 99% of all the issues) for images/photographs.

 

PIERCEatRRNYDealer1001.jpg

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Walt, your postings of the used prestige cars by the Rolls-Royce dealer is educational.  It is interesting to learn the amount of "beating" the former owner took in order to acquire more prestige with a more expensive car.  Thank you for the postings.

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You are very welcome, my pleasure to share the photos from that really obscure sales folder. There are 18 photos of cars shown that were for sale and 8 of those are R-R ( all Silver Ghost)

It reflects the level of cars that were imported in that era and in the Metropolitan NY area. I am positive that some of the cars came from major cities like Philadelphia, Hartford,  and Boston , as the areas around those cities had the clientele that could afford that level of cars.

Let's hope that next year the AACA annual meeting will once again be in Philadelphia and I can give a talk ( yes with lots of period photographs and images) on coach builders. I did that for the CCCA at some of their annual meetings a few years ago .

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4 minutes ago, twin6 said:

Gov. Martin G. Brumbaugh of Pennsylvania with a 1915 Packard limousine. Big car.

1915 MGB.jpg

Note how short the chauffeur and footman are compared to the Governor. This was typical, all the room in chauffeured cars was provided for the owner of the car - in the back. Up front it was really tight quarters and usually the front seat was not adjustable. I love town cars,( enclosed drive limousines etc) and owned one for over 10 years and was in denial for the entire time that I fit well enough to be comfortable driving it. I was to long in leg. I also have a chauffeurs uniform from the 1920s, plus the stiff  leather chaps that you see here they are wearing that cover the lower leg from the shoe to the knee, looks great - yes, and it feels like you have your lower leg wrapped in a piece of sheet steel. That is not stated to amuse- it is a fact.

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2 hours ago, LCK81403 said:

Walt, your postings of the used prestige cars by the Rolls-Royce dealer is educational.  It is interesting to learn the amount of "beating" the former owner took in order to acquire more prestige with a more expensive car.  Thank you for the postings.

IF the owner owned a business such as a steel mill, he would have purchased it through his company, and not taken any beating at all.  Uncle Sam would take the beating in the form of the owner writing off depreciation, insurance, etc., in taxes.

 

Craig 

Edited by 8E45E (see edit history)
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1 hour ago, Walt G said:

plus the stiff  leather chaps that you see here they are wearing that cover the lower leg from the shoe to the knee, looks great - yes, and it feels like you have your lower leg wrapped in a piece of sheet steel. That is not stated to amuse- it is a fact.

 

Those were also often called 'puttees' or 'leather puttees' back in the day. Technically, and the origin of the term, 'puttee' is the cloth wrapping that began at the top of the shoe and was tied up below the knee, as worn by foot soldiers around the world about a hundred years ago. However the term was also applied to the leather leggings (another term also used for those shown in the photo) that served the same purpose.

I have several original era pair of leggings/puttees and have worn them many times years ago. You are correct about them feeling like having your lower legs "wrapped in a piece of sheet steel". But wear them enough, and you get used to it.

Wearing authentic era clothing with your antique automobiles is a whole another education. Ever watch an era silent film, and notice how people walk funny? See how they stiffly shift their balance from one foot to the other as they walk? Wear hard leather sole shoes along with garters and a three piece suit with a tight vest for a day or two, and you may know why they walked that way!

 

I have also worn the cloth wrappings with my World War 1 army uniform for parades and such.

Edited by wayne sheldon
Additional thought. (see edit history)
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Here is a 1930 Franklin series 145 sedan ( possibly a series 147 the longer wheelbase but at this angle it is difficult to determine)  that was in a sales publication from Europe. The car is equipped with Marchal headlamps that have a crown/crest at the top of the rim of the lamp, and larger parking lamps on the top of the fenders as well as turn signals ( trafficators in the UK) fitted to the front door/windshield posts. That is an oval shield mounted to the center of the headlamp license plate bracket that also has a grown shape mounted to it so the car was part of the royal fleet of cars. Car is left had drive not right. The bumper medallion up front in the center has a image of an airplane cast into it and in the USA was usually fitted to the rear bumper of the similar Franklins sold there. Dark color on the car but with what appears to be a bright color on the belt line molding.

I am posting this here rather then the Franklin designated area of the forums because that seems to be a bit sleepy seeing minor "traffic" so far as views and interest, or even contributions .

FRANKLIN1930europe001.jpg

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From The Movie, "All Through The Night" (1942). 

Starring Humphrey Bogart, Peter Lorre, William Demarest , Jackie Gleason and others.

One Of My Favorite Bogart movies after, "The Maltese Falcon" and "Casablanca".

 

All Through the Night (film) - Wikipedia

 

 

 

All Through The Night.jpg

All Through The Night 2.jpg

All Through The Night 1940 Buick Limited.jpg

All Through The Night 1.jpg

Edited by Dave Gelinas (XP-300) (see edit history)
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20 minutes ago, Dave Gelinas (XP-300) said:

From The Movie, "All Through The Night" (1942). 

Starring Humphrey Bogart, Peter Lorre, William Demarest , Jackie Gleason and others.

One Of My Favorite Bogart movies after, "The Maltese Falcon" and "Casablanca".

 

All Through the Night (film) - Wikipedia

 

12 minutes ago, Walt G said:

One of my favorite movies as well, amazing cars , and a film that many have never seen.

 

And some of us have never heard of. Just looked it up on IMDB and watched the trailer there. Looks like a movie I'd like to see but it does not seem to be on any of the streaming services I currently subscribe to nor at my local library. I guess I'll have to buy a copy.

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If you buy a copy you will watch it over and over again. I bought a copy last year so I could do that. Before you sit down to watch it make sure you go out and buy a cheesecake so you will have something to eat while watching it. I know that Dave would agree with me that it would be the best thing to do.

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13 hours ago, Walt G said:

Let's hope that next year the AACA annual meeting will once again be in Philadelphia and I can give a talk ( yes with lots of period photographs and images) on coach builders. I did that for the CCCA at some of their annual meetings a few years ago .

I don't normally go to the meetings, but for that I would make an exception. I enjoy your photos and stories about the fine old classics.

 

Don

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Walt,

 

Here's one to go with your Purina truck. This was taken in Seaford Delaware in 1919. I leased this building in the 1970's. It was built in 1898 and raised by the State in the mid 1980's.

 

Bill

Enterprise mill circa 1919.jpg

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