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Period images to relieve some of the stress


Walt G

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Ed and Tim thank you for the confirmation of who built the bodies. This is why the AACA Forums are so great, conversations that put answers together for 100 year old motor vehicles , down to who built a body on a car out of wood, brass, bronze and steel . The information is priceless , and although I much prefer a print publication to sit at and read and hold in my hands rather then a computer screen - this works and the well sorted information is now here. Thanks to all who have contributed and also urged and inspired us to keep adding to it. Pandemic therapy by car community activity. ( yeah I know that seems a bit academically stated , and I won't do that again, down to earth comments are where it is at!)

Walt

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Walt referred to the use of French curves, triangles, compasses, etc. in the design of cars before the computer age.  Here are two 1932 photos of the Fisher Body design and metal shops.  All the design guys are wearing ties and white shirts.  Lots of French curves hanging on the walls and on the drafting tables. I'm guessing that these photos were taken from the middle of the shop looking in both directions, though it could have been two different buildings of identical construction.  It was Harley Earl, I was told, who introduced the sets of calibrated "sweeps" to define the curvature of car bodies.  The concept of sweeps was taken from shipbuilding and railroad track layout.  Standard automotive sweeps were 60 inches long and the sweep number set the number of 1/8" offsets at the center of the sweep.  So, a #6 sweep is a shallow curve with 6/8" offset while a #24 sweep had 3" of offset.   Higher numbers resulted in short sweeps. 

You can buy full sets of sweeps from Fay Butler:  http://www.faybutler.com/sweeps2.htm

 

Any recognizable cars in these pictures? 

 

1929701890_FisherBodydesign1932.thumb.jpg.0783877e3608b1f0068ff21e4fa5de87.jpg   

 

 

1946483982_FisherBodydesign1932-2.thumb.jpg.d58070e261032355b5b38c00c4407771.jpg

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3 hours ago, Walt G said:

Designers and stylists were in a sense in competition, even within one corporation like General Motors. The assorted G.M. divisions did not want one make under their umbrella looking at what the other division was doing ideas wise - I got this first hand in conversation with a G.M. designer who was there in the early 1950s. Remember it was an era of hand drawn images, using french curves and rulers, and slide rules for calculations.

When GM disbanded separate design studios and separate engine divisions is what led to their downfall.  

 

IF only GM had learned from BMC/British Leyland a generation prior!!

 

Craig

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6 minutes ago, Gary_Ash said:

Walt referred to the use of French curves, triangles, compasses, etc. in the design of cars before the computer age.  Here are two 1932 photos of the Fisher Body design and metal shops.  All the design guys are wearing ties and white shirts.  Lots of French curves hanging on the walls and on the drafting tables. I'm guessing that these photos were taken from the middle of the shop looking in both directions, though it could have been two different buildings of identical construction.  It was Harley Earl, I was told, who introduced the sets of calibrated "sweeps" to define the curvature of car bodies.  The concept of sweeps was taken from shipbuilding and railroad track layout.  Standard automotive sweeps were 60 inches long and the sweep number set the number of 1/8" offsets at the center of the sweep.  So, a #6 sweep is a shallow curve with 6/8" offset while a #24 sweep had 3" of offset.   Higher numbers resulted in short sweeps. 

You can buy full sets of sweeps from Fay Butler:  http://www.faybutler.com/sweeps2.htm

 

Any recognizable cars in these pictures? 

 

1929701890_FisherBodydesign1932.thumb.jpg.0783877e3608b1f0068ff21e4fa5de87.jpg   

 

 

1946483982_FisherBodydesign1932-2.thumb.jpg.d58070e261032355b5b38c00c4407771.jpg

I believe these two photos have to do with the development of their highly advertised 'Turret Top' that came out in 1935.  They somewhat considered it a historic moment in all-steel body making after getting rid of wooden framework.

 

Craig

Edited by 8E45E (see edit history)
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Once a specific design/style was considered a success, thin plywood and eventually Masonite patterns would be used to lay on material to trace and then cut out. This was particularly true with station wagon bodies made from wood . The J.T. Cantrell CO. of Huntington , long island, NY used these patterns to speed up production work that they got contracts to do by providing station wagons for car manufacturers. Cantrell had a major contract with General Motors and chassis as well as 2 door sedans and business coupes were shipped down from the Tarrytown,NY assembly plant to the Cantrell Body plant and the coupe and sedan bodies remove just above the windshield, keeping the cowl,firewall/dashboard and windshield in tact. Then Cantrell added the bodies, leaving a field full of discarded removed bodies that were then scrapped.

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On 3/21/2021 at 6:37 PM, 30DodgePanel said:

 

One would think but Chrysler publicly ordered the Graham Brother name removed as of Jan/Feb 1929 so maybe dealerships were instructed to not use Graham trucks? 


What surprises me about it is why not have a Dodge Brothers wrecker like the one below? 

 

image.thumb.png.11f23193d05c375c59aa84903c191f20.png

 

 

Any idea where this Dodge Dealer was located? I reminds me of some older buildings that were dealerships here on Long Island.

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1 hour ago, John S. said:

Any idea where this Dodge Dealer was located? I reminds me of some older buildings that were dealerships here on Long Island.

 

Lancaster Ave @ Church Rd in Ardmore PA was one of the used car dealerships now a Napa Auto Parts store. This original dealership building was located less than a half a block from that intersection but is now a open parking lot. The Napa is still on that corner according to maps.

 

Here's another angle showing the original Ardmore ph #.

29 Dodge Tow truck.jpg

Edited by 30DodgePanel (see edit history)
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3 minutes ago, Dave Gelinas (XP-300) said:

Hollywood_and_Wicox_ca1934.jpg

 

30 Dodge panel in the center of photo with what appears to be a bright color (yellow?) for the body.

 

 

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I really like Dave's image of the 1950s convertible with the young ladies talking to five much older men who all would like to think of themselves as being age 35 when they are all in their late 50s and early 60s. The girls are likely discussing how dirty the shoes are on the old man with the white hat.

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Bucket :

 I don't think the shoes are that dirty. They look to be SUMMER SHOES. Fine mesh sides to ward off the summer heat on the feet. I had several pairs untill they dissapeared from the Tom-McKan shoe stores in the early 1970s.

1 hour ago, Dave Gelinas (XP-300) said:

Dave : I see at least 6 Roadsters in this photo.

Hollywood_and_Wicox_ca1934.jpg.e5f1b60a3406157a6771c72373ae7af3.jpg

Any Idea of what town? On the IRIS sign .... Neil Hamitlon was quite the Matinee Idol in 1929. (1960s Batman's Commissioner Gordon.)

 

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2 hours ago, Gary_Ash said:

How about Istanbul?

 

 

Another angle.

img-2.jpg

 

 

I ask because it's from an article in the Fire Engineering Magazine according to a old article dated 07/28/1915 in regards to the St Joseph Mo. fire dept needs at the time. 

Early photo editing a possibility? Looks like several 1914 American LaFrance units along with white men. If they did use Istanbul as a back drop one has to ask why? 

Edited by 30DodgePanel (see edit history)
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1 hour ago, 30DodgePanel said:

 

Another angle.

img-2.jpg

 

 

I ask because it's from an article in the Fire Engineering Magazine according to a old article dated 07/28/1915 in regards to the St Joseph Mo. fire dept needs at the time. 

Early photo editing a possibility? Looks like several 1914 American LaFrance units along with white men. If they did use Istanbul as a back drop one has to ask why? Or better yet, would this be in France somewhere?

 

Could the background be some sort of temporary exhibition venue? I know that something along those lines, but nowhere near as big, was built for the big Exhibition held in Christchurch New Zealand in 1906.

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2 hours ago, Gary_Ash said:

 

Here's why I thought the background was Istanbul:  a photo of the Hagia Sophia.

 

905060749_HagiaSophia-Istanbul.thumb.jpg.b02b4cbdead7f498513c8189503ffce4.jpg

The Hagia Sofia had the minerets added when it became a mosque (long before cars), and I don't see them in the posted photo

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I believe Metro is right, The World's Fair, Louisiana Purchase Exposition, in St.Louis in 1904 had very similar looking buildings. The buildings must have been still standing for the picture in 1914. 

 

Dave

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On 3/24/2021 at 7:13 PM, Dave Gelinas (XP-300) said:

DonLeecardealer1930.jpg

Don Lee in addition to being a Cadillac - La Salle dealer was also a coach builder for custom bodies on a variety of chassis including Pierce Arrow, Rolls Royce etc.

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1910 Packard model 30, well guarded, in Mexico.  Must have worked better than those "please don't touch" signs at concours events. Not sure, but possibly these fellows are involved with the Mexican revolution. The one attired in black has a nice Winchester model 95.  Maybe someone else can ID the other hardware.

P and W.jpg

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C.G.V. late in 1905 ( November) I enjoy the description noting that it is a Lady's Car for Town and Country. and can travel from 2 to 40 mph .

CGV1905001.jpg

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