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Period images to relieve some of the stress


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Ok so here we go for page Tree-hun-red one. 😉 The street scene is from approximately 1930. I have no idea of location but the radio transmission towers in the back start with a K , which isn't much help. No license plate visible clearly to give us a clue. The 2 door sedan in the foreground is pretty worn out so I am guessing was owned and used by one of the construction workers for the building being built.

The two door victoria is a Panhard from 1927 coachwork by Gaston Grummer and was built for Nadine Picard. Location is at one of the numerous social gatherings of car owners, somewhat like an outside salon/concours. Everyone attending was usually very well dressed. They were most popular in France.

Third photo is of a 1938 Lincoln 7 passenger sedan taken in 1942 in Illinois.

STREETscene1930001.jpg

Peugeot1927GastonGrummer001.jpg

Lincoln1938Ksevenpass001.jpg

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Walt, this is a great test for imagery analysts.  What can we wring out of that photo.  Regarding the "K" of the radio station.  As the U.S. lower 48 states were divided for purpose of radio station identification, K-call signs were west of a north-south dividing line from Canada to the border with Mexico.  Generally speaking the K-stations were west of that line, west of the borders between Montana-North Dakota & South Dakota, Wyoming-South Dakota & Nebraska, Colorado-Kansas, New Mexico and Oklahoma & Texas.  In January, 1923 the dividing boundary between K (west) and W (east) radio call signs shifted east to generally the Mississippi River.  An example of this today is Minneapolis and St. Paul, Minnesota, the Twin Cities divided by the Mississippi River.  In Minneapolis is the station KSTP radio with channel 5 TV, and in St. Paul is WCCO radio with channel 4 TV.  Based on the apparent ages of the cars in the photo, and your spotting of the "K" for the radio station, the location of the building under construction is somewhere west of the Mississippi River.  There are two large metal radio antenna towers on the building's roof, and that may be significant, and also the building itself is large and significant looking.  Consulting the attached map, perhaps the building is in either New Orleans (doubtful), Memphis (maybe), St. Louis (most probable), or Minneapolis/St. Paul, Minnesota.  These large cities are right on the border line between the K and W radio call zones.  My best guess is St. Louis, Missouri, with one of the transmitter towers being used by a K-call commercial station broadcasting for listeners to the west, and a second W-call station broadcasting to the east.  While the radio signals go where they will, the content of the radio broadcasts is geared to the listeners.  At night when the F-layers in the atmosphere change their reflectivity of the radio signals, night-time broadcasts and listening audience can be very much different than day-time.  I well remember listening at night to cool blues and zydeco music on my AM radio in Minnesota, broadcast from a radio station in Shreveport, Louisiana.  The Shreveport radio station "skipped" it's signal at night that long distance that could not happen during the day's F-layers which are modified by the sun's radiation.  Blues and zydeco was a refreshing welcome from the same old polka and waltz music that we lived with up there in the corn and soy bean country.

 

The extra cool street lamp in the photo reminds me of Kansas City, Kansas when we passed through there on a troop train.

STREETscene1930001.thumb.jpg.c9d0ddc480cc1b90592a203bb03cad7a 001.jpg

DSC01047.JPG

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Thanks for the great comment and analysis!  I knew that there was a "K" lettered radio station in California because the local Packard dealer had a big hand in that, and that was about the extent of my knowledge for radio stations.  No trees seen in the photo so can't get a clue from that ( palm trees denoting the climate) I have a very good long time friend who likes in St. Louis so will send him a copy of the photo to see if he can recognize the building. As you note about the great street lamp, a major city would have these not a small town or municipality.

It made me sooo happy to generate this kind of comment - I love making people think when posing a period photograph. It drives some of the local residents where I live a bit crazy when I do it for the village I reside in and am the local historian for.

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I love these factory portraits taken inside the building probably just minutes after the final touches have been completed.  Workers were task with hanging whatever fabric sheets they could get as a plain backdrop, in this case rather dirty and stained.   What we don't see but can sense is behind the camera is a group of very tired craftsmen who put in a yeoman's effort to complete this magnificent show car in time, plus a few managers who were pretty satisfied with the car they were about to spring on the public.

'33 Pierce-Arrow Silver Arrow factory photo.jpg

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The 2 door car in the foreground, appears to be a 1927 ESSEX.

Rear brakes, no front brakes, cowl light on A post, shape of Head light bucket, single belt line on body only-not on cowl or hood,  louvers on hood side.

and  Gas cap location.

 

Just my thoughts..................!

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9 hours ago, Tph479 said:

Silver arrow and sporting black walls.

10BCDF82-8E30-4629-AD3F-24402EFD5257.jpeg


 

Silver Arrow.....in the original two tone brown.

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51 minutes ago, BobinVirginia said:

1921 Haynes Model 55 Type T 

251E282B-801C-4924-BA91-1679A22A7150.jpeg

 

Seems to me your catching on fast with this crew..........👍👍👍

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If one has access to color sample books issued by the paint suppliers of the era or large collections of paint chips ( not broken up and sold off over the years to assorted people who only wanted the pile for their brand of car) it is a great commentary on what colors were popular for what cars across the board as well as for individual makes or car companies that offered several makes of car for sale. My art teaching back ground and historian /author place in life find so many things commenting "on the era" to give an overall view of exactly what life was like when these vehicles of the pre war era were new.

I know there are those of you that just read that and are shaking your heads saying " this guy has to many visions, thinks way outside of the box". 🙄 Can't help it, has always been that way.

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42 minutes ago, Walt G said:

If one has access to color sample books issued by the paint suppliers of the era or large collections of paint chips ( not broken up and sold off over the years to assorted people who only wanted the pile for their brand of car) it is a great commentary on what colors were popular for what cars across the board as well as for individual makes or car companies that offered several makes of car for sale. My art teaching back ground and historian /author place in life find so many things commenting "on the era" to give an overall view of exactly what life was like when these vehicles of the pre war era were new.

I know there are those of you that just read that and are shaking your heads saying " this guy has to many visions, thinks way outside of the box". 🙄 Can't help it, has always been that way.

One thing that always intrigued me was why brighter reds were hardly ever offered until the early 1950's; only maroons and maybe a 'darker' red like a carmine red, not counting fire trucks.

 

I know red pigments were fragile for stability out in the elements, and the most fade-prone, but so were the first metallic (opalescent) finishes, regardless of the color for fading.

 

Craig

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Posted (edited)

Reds still cost more to produce ( at least for paint used by artists for pictures) it is also a color that says "look at me". Many brass era cars were more prolific in red when new. With the depressing world wide activity in WWI then a few good years and the Great depression the color red was not looked upon as something to put in other peoples faces on a new car, even on wheels. The first real metallic colors became more popular in the mid 1930s in browns and greens. They were not the 'day-glo' metallics that appeared in the postwar era when the Age of Aquarius let the sun shine in.......🙃

Edited by Walt G
reworded for clarity (see edit history)
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On the topic of movie cars, watching the Mystery of The Wax Museum on Svengoolie last evening, what should appear but this 1932 Auburn 12-160 cabriolet.  The movie is the typical early 1930's 'horror' genre; thin stock plot, cardboard characters but the sets are great period Art Deco examples and the hard-boiled, fast-talking young woman reporter has some of the best lines of period slang delivered rapid fire.  When you are in the mood for some dopey, mindless entertainment with a great car, check it out.  Incidentally, Svengoolie explained the movie was filmed in an early version of 'Techni-Color' through red and green filters which makes it more visually interesting as well.

'32 Auburn 12-160 - Mystery of The Wax Museum 1933 a.jpg

'32 Auburn 12-160 - Mystery of The Wax Museum 1933 b.jpg

'32 Auburn 12-160 - Mystery of The Wax Museum 1933 c.jpg

'32 Auburn 12-160 - Mystery of The Wax Museum 1933 d.jpg

'32 Auburn 12-160 - Mystery of The Wax Museum 1933 e.jpg

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About the time when a person thinks he's seen it all, along comes yet another photo to prove him wrong.  This Auto Wash Bowl must have been an urban thing; country people just drove the family jalopy through the creek on the way to town. Perhaps Walt has some sage insight about this.

Garage Service 011.jpg

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On 3/12/2021 at 6:00 PM, John_Mereness said:

159622321_10159603801162189_2286737972814737250_n.jpg

 

Of course the Pebble Beach BOS Voisin,  but there is something about that photo that doesn't look right to me.

 

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56 minutes ago, LCK81403 said:

About the time when a person thinks he's seen it all, along comes yet another photo to prove him wrong.  This Auto Wash Bowl must have been an urban thing; country people just drove the family jalopy through the creek on the way to town. Perhaps Walt has some sage insight about this.

Garage Service 011.jpg

The only thing I can comment on is that all the cars after this dip and wash and wheel floss is that the wood wheels will not squeak or creak for some time until after they dry out. I heard a rumor that one of these swoosh palaces is being established near every major national "Concours " and there will be a new requirement that all drivers /owners of cars registered and participating in the 'Posh and Polish' events will have to drive this after their numerous visits to the free drink tents. This will prove to all , that like the wheels on the car they too will not squeak or creak for some time until after they dry out. 🧐

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M.E. Tunningley DeSoto-Plymouth, Nunda, NY was still selling new cars through the 1960's when I was growing up.  Melvin stayed a Plymouth dealership after DeSoto's demise, but he did handle Triumph cars for a time.   The showroom was just large enough for one car at an angle, which entered through fold-away doors between the showroom and service bays.  Like most small-town dealers, he kept maybe one demonstrator of the full-size, intermediate and compact, one to three other new cars, had a dozen or so used cars around at times.  He started in the early 1930's with his brother Norm as a Ford dealer, who took the Ford dealership to a different Nunda location.   Melvin took the Plymouth-DeSoto franchise over from another local operator, moved it to this location, if I recall the details correctly.  After forty years, Melvin quit about 1971-'72.  That was the end of a Plymouth dealer here.

M.E.Tunningley DeSoto-Plymouth, Nunda, NY late '40's.jpg

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5 hours ago, LCK81403 said:

About the time when a person thinks he's seen it all, along comes yet another photo to prove him wrong.  This Auto Wash Bowl must have been an urban thing; country people just drove the family jalopy through the creek on the way to town. Perhaps Walt has some sage insight about this.

Garage Service 011.jpg

I did some work at a land fill, they had built a rather expensive under carriage wash for the trucks exiting the cell area to make sure all of the mud was off before they hit the public road. I suppose they werent the first with that idea!  

 

I did read someplace,  that in the day it was common practice to ride through water to keep the wood spokes tight. As a woodworking I always thought that sounded a bit suspect, maybe a bit of urban legend.

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Kerry, your photo and thoughts bring back memories of when the new car models appeared in the showrooms in the autumn.  In farm land Minnesota that was a big deal.  The residents and farmers from miles around would "come to town" to see the new Ford and Chevy models, and free donuts and coffee was a major plus.  I remember seeing 50 or 75 people crammed in the small showrooms of the day; it was like a family reunion for the farmers seeing their widely dispersed neighbors again.  Then in the early spring the new tractors would be in the implement dealer's showrooms, John Deere, Oliver, Massey Harris, and again free coffee and donuts.  My great-uncle traded in his Dodge for a new Studebaker, with the same dealer who also handled Farmall tractors.  It was a different time, a different country then.

353306921_M.E.TunningleyDeSoto-PlymouthNundaNYlate40s.thumb.jpg.638c42374392efc5e01d721ba5ae7640.jpg

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3 hours ago, md murray said:

So cool.

 

120.JPG

 

Timeless classic. Thank you for posting this.

 

Simple lettering, yet I would venture to say the artist did it free hand. I grew up around an uncle who made a living on free hand sign painting... I've always said those guys from the early turn of the century even into the 1970s were amazingly talented. True artists and students of calligraphy... wish I would have claimed his books and tools when I had the chance before the mongrels got to them.

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