Walt G

Period Images to Relieve some of the Stress

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13 minutes ago, 3macboys said:

Delahaye 135?


Talbot..........

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13 hours ago, Dandy Dave said:

This is a Reo.  Around a 1929. I had a Model GA Reo years ago. 

If commercial Reos are of interest, this book has some interesting Reo transit bus history in Montreal:  https://www.boutiquestm.com/en/livre-100-ans-de-bus-a-montreal.html

 

Unfortunately, its only available text 'en francais', but the period photos and illustrations make up for it.

 

Craig

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16 hours ago, Walt G said:

As Tony the tiger used to say "Grrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrreat!" The Mercedes - Benz are in a shelter that early car collector D. Cameron Peck used to keep his collection in, they were his cars. Photo was taken in the very early 1950s. Keiser - yep truck is a Reo Speed wagon, note the gas tank mounted just below the windshield. And yes again, that is a Packard model 433 from 1928.

One thing about the Reo truck photo I don't get - note the lettering on the window on the building - VIM. That was a truck built in Philadelphia , in fact I owned a VIM once.

I have to many images here in my archives. I haven't had time to look through the issues of the French OMNIA and L'Illustration magazines yet. OMNIA was a monthly slick paper auto journal/magazine , started life in 1920 and ended in 1936 , loaded with information and photographs. I have nearly a full run except for about 6 issues. L'Illustration had an annual auto number that was devoted to all the cars at the Paris salon.

 

 

I just added these two issues to my collection, never saw one before, if you stacked 2-3 issues of 1960's era LIFE magazines together you have an idea of the size of an issue. Bob 

DSCF5918.JPG

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Bob, this is great that you were able to add those to your collection. Congratulations!  Absolutely wonderful! The 'auto numbers' of European magazines are not well known in the USA , even to researchers and automotive historians. Magazines as you show us here as well as Omnia, which was a bit smaller in size and devoted every issue to cars/vehicles were printed on coated stock paper. This allowed the reproduction of images and especially photographs to be so much clearer. Magazines that were printed on a courser paper - newsprint , would see less definition of detail and after 80+ years now the news print paper which had more acid content has deteriorated much more rapidly compared to the coated stock. So much for today's lesson!

If you are looking to do research you need to be aware of what periodicals, brochures etc were printed when the vehicles were new, this is not necessarily an easy task to get information on unless you see some in someone's collection to actually know what to look for. I was fortunate enough to work for Austin Clark in his home library in the early 1970s so got to see first hand many periodicals I had never heard of before. I was able to then start to build my own library ( focusing on the WWI to WWII era) and had friends in England that would seek things out for me , and knowing I wanted them would just buy or trade for them when they found them as they had my "want list". People like Peter Moore of Motor Book Postal Auctions in Sussex, and the great historian Michael Sedgwick were great pals of mine. American cars were well represented in European magazines , such as the two mentioned above as well as La Carrossiere, and the auto number issues of The Motor and Autocar are also great resources for information and photographs, as are the huge thick annual motor show programs for Paris, London, Berlin and Brussels. OK, I will stop now, ranting about where to look and what to find. A good number of American cars saw sales literature printed in Europe so there are sales catalogs which are issued by the European agents for : Buick, Lincoln, Packard , Franklin, Ford and others as well.....................

Walt

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Thanks Walt, love posting something that gets you (and others)talking about the good old days of our hobby. Bob 

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15 hours ago, edinmass said:

And more......

7871DA9D-011D-4B58-B250-AF6A1A39DBEE.png

 

I think I recognize those water cannons and the step to the left.

Could this be Paris?

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gotta keep everyones spirits up. The ad is from the 1921 custom body salon catalog as I don't have any period photos of the make.

the Fact-Tree postcard is for Ed. Plus bodies in a field , those of you that read my last story will know where that is and what the bodies were cut off of when new and why.

pieerce arrow factory 1912002.jpg

Richealieu1921Saoloncatalog ad001.jpg

  Cantrellfactory003.jpg

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Every auto body repair shop in the NYC/Long Island/NJ metro area when they got an '40's A-body GM coach in that took a rear end hit must have called Cantrell for a quick replacement. 

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1 hour ago, Walt G said:

Plus bodies in a field , those of you that read my last story will know where that is and what the bodies were cut off of when new and why.

 

 

Cantrellfactory003.jpg

Walt,

           Apparently I missed that story but this picture has certainly piqued my interest!

Could you add a link please?

Greg

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1 hour ago, 28 Chrysler said:

 GM, Year Make and Models ?

GM-Stamped-Turret-Tops-Circa-1935.jpg

This picture shows what we rarely consider, the logistics of large scale manufacture, in this case stamped roof panels for shipment to GM's many body assembly plant around the country.   The designers had a dictum: "Nest! Don't stack." when designing.   Best guess is these are '40's A-body roof panels used by all GM makes except Cadillac.

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33 minutes ago, GregLaR said:

Walt,

           Apparently I missed that story but this picture has certainly piqued my interest!

Could you add a link please?

Greg

Hemmings Classic Car magazine April 2020 issue #187

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17 hours ago, edinmass said:

More of the obscure......

F6623BC4-BB16-4A99-8465-3BED3B92E1FF.png

 

I believe it is a 1937 Talbot-Lago.

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Posted (edited)

Back in the late 1960's there was a guy that would show up at swap meets with wood cases filled with Locomobile factory photo glass plate negatives. Think this is from around 1910, chain drive. . Sheets in the back highlight features for use in an ad or factory brochure. Detail is really good. If someone can enlarge it please do. Bob 

DSCF5915.JPG

Edited by 1937hd45 (see edit history)
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This is the best I can get it.

1910's Locomobile factory photo.jpg

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18 hours ago, edinmass said:

Not an easy car to ID......

DBAAFAB4-9FBC-4E41-923A-A69DF6A4C658.png

Anyone else wager a guess on the Minerva looking car? Vauxhall had a radiator sort of like that but this looks like a more substantial car

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Just now, md murray said:

Anyone else wager a guess on the Minerva looking car? Vauxhall had a radiator sort of like that but this looks like a more substantial car

 

 

Did they make a Gobron-Brillie at that time? Bob 

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22 hours ago, keiser31 said:

1931 Packard 840?

 

Looks to have the 1932 dress up kit grill shell.

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21 hours ago, 1937hd45 said:

D6E4A60D-3AC8-4922-AE3E-0891BC00DDEC.jpegEd, just how useful would that set of gas, oil and water cans be on a J ? Bob

 

Those cans might be Whiskey, Gin and Rum...

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. If someone can enlarge it please do. Bob 

 

OK, Bob, 

 

Hope this enlargement helps:

 

DSCF5915.JPG.a25330e7b81ca0b193b1bbf55e54b8fe.JPG

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