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Period images to relieve some of the stress


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2 minutes ago, Walt G said:

Special Day here for me today as it marks exactly a year since I started this thread on period Images. I have always been one to want to share what I knew or what I had in my collection, it is the teacher in me, but as a kid I liked to see friends happy as well. I never thought this thread would last more then a few months. I had some friends I knew that would jump in and post some cool photographs from their collections, from both sides of the pond known as the Atlantic Ocean. It is so good to know that what has been shown here has made a few people have some moments of relief from all the health concerns that we have had to cope with. I was gratified and choke up when I read that some of you look at this every day for a needed break from what we have to deal with . Thanks so much to all of you who have contributed, to AACA for putting up with all of this.

We are now on the brink of 300 pages, and so many replies and over a quarter million views - HUH? Really!

Many of you I never knew or heard of before this pandemic and this thread started, I now consider you good friends even though we have not met in person, THANK YOU for your efforts , just so many good people . Keep well all , thanks for stopping by and sharing the history. Keep in mind it is AACA who is the host , never forget that.

With my greatest respect,

Walt

1937PackardtROLLSTON phaeton super8model1501010.jpg

BodyTypes(2 )DUAL COWL PHAETON-1916Locomobilephaetonmodel48003.jpg

Thanks Walt, very much!!!!! .............Jim

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1 hour ago, 34LaSalleClubSedan said:

 

The light-colored car immediately above Jim's message is a Model 48 Locomobile, likely a Farhnam and Nelson body equipped with a cape top. Several survive. 

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28 minutes ago, jrbartlett said:

The light-colored car immediately above Jim's message is a Model 48 Locomobile, likely a Farhnam and Nelson body equipped with a cape top. Several survive. 

Here's one that's been wonderfully restored by a fine gentleman in Western New York, rendered in black and white to be consistent with the pre-war theme:

'17 Locomobile dual cowl - McAlpin - B & W.jpg

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By golly, Twin6, that is an interesting photo.  After studying the photo I am guessing that the driver is refilling an oil tank.  Attached to the left side of the driver's seat is what appears to be an air pump, said air pump probably attached to the small diameter hose that is attached to the filler cap on the top of probably fuel tank number 19.  In old journals I read about air pumps used to supply pressurized air to fuel tanks for purpose of forcing fuel to the carburetor.  Plus I have read about the large amounts of lubricating oil carried on early cars, hence the apparent reason for such a large oil tank.

19.thumb.jpg.9ba966da8143f522f9491d50a04753d6.jpg

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21 minutes ago, LCK81403 said:

By golly, Twin6, that is an interesting photo.  After studying the photo I am guessing that the driver is refilling an oil tank.  Attached to the left side of the driver's seat is what appears to be an air pump, said air pump probably attached to the small diameter hose that is attached to the filler cap on the top of probably fuel tank number 19.  In old journals I read about air pumps used to supply pressurized air to fuel tanks for purpose of forcing fuel to the carburetor.  Plus I have read about the large amounts of lubricating oil carried on early cars, hence the apparent reason for such a large oil tank.

19.thumb.jpg.9ba966da8143f522f9491d50a04753d6.jpg

Totally correct on that comment and points you made. I had all of this explained to me by Austin Clark early on - over 50 years ago. Note the hand pump is on the passenger side of the seats. This was so the "riding mechanic" would perform that task while going down the road because the driver was to busy, steering, shifting and controlling the spark and throttle. I had the job of using /working that pump to pressurize the gas tank to send fuel to the carburetor on Austin's type 35 Mercer many times on trips we used that car for . We took his car out to lunch but of course had to get it "warmed up " not just get in and drive a mile or more and then shut it off.  Usually a 3 to 5 mile exercise before settling down for some good food and refreshments.

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2 hours ago, Walt G said:

Totally correct on that comment and points you made. I had all of this explained to me by Austin Clark early on - over 50 years ago. Note the hand pump is on the passenger side of the seats. This was so the "riding mechanic" would perform that task while going down the road because the driver was to busy, steering, shifting and controlling the spark and throttle. I had the job of using /working that pump to pressurize the gas tank to send fuel to the carburetor on Austin's type 35 Mercer many times on trips we used that car for . We took his car out to lunch but of course had to get it "warmed up " not just get in and drive a mile or more and then shut it off.  Usually a 3 to 5 mile exercise before settling down for some good food and refreshments.

 

I think much of that oil carried simply fell out of the what passed for seals in early engines, although they did consume quite a lot as well. 

 

Did Austin's Mercer leave puddles when it was parked or had it been 'sealed up'?

 

I had a discussion on the subject with my son just a few days ago.  Nowadays we expect our normal daily driver cars to not use any oil at all, but it is not that long ago that it was expected that engines would use at least 'some'. His current transport is an early 1990s Toyota Trueno, a sporty coupe based on the Corolla chassis of the day. It has the 20 valve 1600 cc 4A-GE engine which makes peak power (155hp) at 7,400 rpm. It has done over 200,000 miles and is still strong but does need to have its oil level checked frequently.

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Hard to recall exactly but I do not recall puddles under Austin's Mercer, perhaps a few drip spots but that would be/could be  common on many pre war cars even up into the 1930s.

To many stories, to many memories of "adventures " with good friends, all whom I only met and got to know well because of our common interest in old cars.

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Walt, you have provided thru AACA a wonderful diversion from all that has gone wrong this last year. Not only do I check this thread daily I do it several times a day, it is that interesting. Seeing cars I had heard about but never seen is a special treat. Seeing cars I never heard of is awesome. Here’s to another 300 pages at least. We appreciate all the input from all the contributors but you especially for starting this one. 
dave s 

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Everyone, it was my pleasure to do this, so very pleased that it was well received and still is accomplishing its original intent - to relieve some of the stress.

John, thanks for pushing the pages to 300 with an absolutely great photo of that Pierce Arrow sedan. As I mentioned some time ago - just look in that photo ( and the majority  of the photos) of all the other "era" features and history we can view - her coat and hat, the magnificent homes in the back ground that don't have a bit of plastic or aluminum construction showing. Time warp photographs. ( I know I mention architecture a lot - cars are rolling architecture to me, my grandfather and father were builders, and more then two decades ago I made a loud noise here in the village that my family has resided in since 1924 that there had to be an Architectural review board because to many homes were being modified (or torn down ) to accommodate the needs of the current owner in the cheapest way possible. I got a call from the then Mayor and was told " you got your wish you will see our village have a review board , now gather your crew to write the laws for that for people to follow who have to appear before it" I did and the laws still are  in affect. 

The history in the photos we see here is priceless, Images of the era.

Walt

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A year already! Congratulations to Walt G, and all involved. Thanks to John M for so many wonderful postings, and hitting the BIG 3-0-0-.

 

And for an unusual contribution, a 'pre-pre-war-war electric;

 

(I would give due credit, but I do not remember where I found it?)

 

earlyfancyelectric.jpg

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