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15 hours ago, nzcarnerd said:

 

1941 Cadillac?

 

Yes,

1941 Cadillac.

The chromespears on the fender, and the chrome vent on the side of the hood are indicative of the 1941 Cadillac.

 

Thanks for posting the pic.

Edited by Marty Roth (see edit history)
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According to the by-line, a contractor found a bunch of old cars in a ravine and dug them out. No idea where or when. It said there were something like 40 cars there. Probably the back lot of an old junkyard. The owner pushed them over the bank and walked away. Most of them probably junk, but these 2 definitely look like they can be saved...with a big checkbook.

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26 minutes ago, Larry Schramm said:

 

So what's the story on this car?

 

If Bob is still paying attention he might be able to point you to where the story and that car are covered on the HAMB.

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With the oval door handles on that touring car ( one with the family and the cool puppy next to it) is that a 7 passenger touring? I know Packard liked to fit oval door handles to the 7 passenger open cars for a while at least through 1930.

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Yes, Packard seven passenger touring.  With the two piece windshield, I think we can narrow this down to first series (1924), a model 1-43.  Unsure of the dog.

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Is this a European version of the Reeves Octauto?  The car's style suggests it may be French.  A question comes to mind, "Why?"  The eight wheel Octauto didn't work out well, even after Reeves put a muffler on the stretched Overland, and a paper mache horse's head on the gas tank.

 

a6858dc02ad63cdd7c2b97ecdb542a9e.jpg

Octauto 03.jpg

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Polishing body, hood and fender panels is a task some reading this enjoy and some only do until half way through the task , depending upon how large the car you are working on is! Using equipment to do so beyond a rag in your hand to accomplish the job in less time has been around for over a century . By the late 1920s flexible shaft equipment was being reviewed and evaluated by the industry and written up in trade periodicals like the Motor Vehicle Monthly magazine. These images are from late in 1929 and show the Hoskins units for production work that had recently been installed in car factories. The hoods being polished are from the Reo Motor Car Company. Note the lack of face masks and the use of wood forms to lay the hood on to work on. Information at the time noted that 850 RPM was best for the rubbing operation and 1,750 RPM for the polishing with a sheepswool buff. The rubbing machine had a 1/2 HP motor . There is just so much information "of the era" that has never really been researched or focused on that gives a great insight into how the vehicles we admire were made.  In depth articles that give enough information but also are a "good read" for the current enthusiast could and should be written and published , but there is only so much space in club publications to do so. 

POLISHBODY1929.jpg

Polishhood1929.jpg

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26 minutes ago, LCK81403 said:

Is this a European version of the Reeves Octauto?  The car's style suggests it may be French.  A question comes to mind, "Why?"  The eight wheel Octauto didn't work out well, even after Reeves put a muffler on the stretched Overland, and a paper mache horse's head on the gas tank.

 

a6858dc02ad63cdd7c2b97ecdb542a9e.jpg

Octauto 03.jpg

I think it is German.  Grille shell suggests it is based on an Adler Trumf (minus Adler insignia) of about 1934.  

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On 2/9/2021 at 4:28 PM, LCK81403 said:

Anybody know the skinny on this '32 Cord E-1 prototype?  It's turning radius probably would not be compatible with Boston's streets.

32 Cord E-1 prototype.jpg

I thought there were were two of these bodies that survived - one Blue and one in Maroon.  The fenders were found from a Cord customized over time, and the grills (1 or 2 found) too.  The engine supposedly came from the powerplant (and Auburn V-12).  Otherwise, largely new construction to turn parts into a complete car.  My only question is with all the surviving photos that there appear to be none of this car new in the wild and it would be a blast to see even a glimpse ? 

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21 hours ago, Larry Schramm said:

 

So what's the story on this car?

 

 

Another easy restoration..............the pickers said it was worth 50k.

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7 hours ago, John_Mereness said:

My only question is with all the surviving photos that there appear to be none of this car new in the wild and it would be a blast to see even a glimpse ? 

I don't think there ever were any photos of them taken 'in the wild' since they were prototypes and probably not sold to the public.  I'd expect the only place photos may be found is right where the car is now; in the ACD styling studio archives.

 

Craig

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On 2/9/2021 at 4:28 PM, LCK81403 said:

Anybody know the skinny on this '32 Cord E-1 prototype?  It's turning radius probably would not be compatible with Boston's streets.

32 Cord E-1 prototype.jpg

 

There were two articles about this car in Special Interest Autos back in the 90s.  You can read the articles online on Hemmings' website:

 

https://www.hemmings.com/stories/2012/04/22/sia-flashback-found-the-real-lost-cord-part-1

 

https://www.hemmings.com/stories/2012/04/29/sia-flashback-found-the-real-lost-cord-part-2

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1 hour ago, edinmass said:

 

 

Another easy restoration..............the pickers said it was worth 50k.

 

To the uninitiated, they are all easy restorations that should only take a couple of months.... because that is what is shown on TV.  Those of us that know, just laugh at the "time line" of getting stuff done fast.

 

I have a friend that just inherited his Dad's Model T.  I have tried to tell him that with these old cars, time lines are not like taking a modern car to the dealer and getting it fixed in a couple of days.  Some times it takes months or years to complete a project especially for non mainstream vehicles where making parts are required to get it running again.  

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On 2/9/2021 at 3:28 PM, LCK81403 said:

Anybody know the skinny on this '32 Cord E-1 prototype?  It's turning radius probably would not be compatible with Boston's streets.

32 Cord E-1 prototype.jpg

 

 

Uhhh, turning radius of the Knock Nevis...  But its absolutely gorgeous!  

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On 2/7/2021 at 2:13 PM, edinmass said:

3ED5972A-DBDC-4DD7-8C68-A0778E5D933A.png

 

This car began as a 1930 Packard 734 Speedster Eight runabout (boattail). In 1932, Packard chief designer Ed Macauley began playing with the idea of updating it to a Twelve. Eventually, the car was fitted with the LeBaron-style fenders, and later fitted with a 1935 hood. Four 1934, "production" boattail speedster were built, all of which still exist. The question as to whatever happened to the prototype has finally been resolved. I found these two unidentified photos during the past year posted on FaceBook. First, the sedan, then the boattail. When I first saw the sedan, I noticed the LeBaron-only hood ornament, along with the LeBaron-style fenders, wondering if this is what happened to Macauley's speedster prototype. Then, a few days ago, the boattail photo appeared. There is no denying that it is the Macauley speedster, based on the rocker/splash covers, and the fact that it sports the 1930 Model 734 body (the "productioon" 1934 boattail speedsters were very similar in design, but very much different at the same time). Both of these cars sport the same license plate, and European headlights.

 

 

Macauley Speedster 1.jpeg

Macauley speedster at Brooklands.jpg

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One more thing I have noticed. The Macauley Speedster's LeBaron-style fenders do not match the fenders of the LeBaron boattails (nor the phaetons, for that matter) ... BUT.... they DO match the fenders of the LeBaron coupes. Notice the widow's peak at the front edge of the fender, as well as the bead and dip on the lower part of the fender skirt. Also note how the running board fits into the front fender, as opposed to ending before it gets there.

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Macauley Speedster 1.jpeg

Screen Shot 2021-02-11 at 1.20.37 PM.png

Screen Shot 2021-02-11 at 2.35.32 PM.png

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The 1932 CORD E -1 prototype was CORD's longest vehicle. It just might also be the longest vehicle manufactured in the US? I have read that production of this behemoth during the height of the depression was just not in the cards. I have always wondered what could be stored under that super long hood other than an engine? 

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On the building behind the automobile is a sign that looks like a London underground (subway) sign.  If that is true and this is a British vehicle, what is it?  Notice too the gasoline pump apparently on the sidewalk's edge.

c2a104b37d95a07cf830da9f02628dff.jpg

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Here's how the replica of the Macauley Packard looked in December 2020, not progressing rapidly.  Wray Schelin in the foreground.  I'll be in the shop on Friday, can get more photos.

 

906951915_McAuleyPackardandWraySchelin.thumb.JPG.e44c98313ae60c6d620352c35cd5c7a2.JPG

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I rode in that wonderful white coupe when it was here on long island owned by a great guy - John Linhardt. The original owner of the car lived about 12 miles north of me, a man named Davidoff.  John bought the car from the original owner and it ran better then it looked! We went to the HCCA pre 1942 car show in Ridgefield, Ct. in it together along with the Pierce-Arrow guy Don Gilbert.  The B & W photo is of the car in 1950.

SO many memories, so much information and way to much period photographs, literature, periodicals, show programs etc here.

Screen Shot 2021-02-11 at 2.30.15 PM.png

PackardLeBaroncoupe1934in1950001.jpg

Edited by Walt G
added information. (see edit history)
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3 hours ago, Walt G said:

I rode in that wonderful white coupe when it was here on long island owned by a great guy - John Linhardt. The original owner of the car lived about 12 miles north of me, a man named Davidoff.  John bought the car from the original owner and it ran better then it looked! We went to the HCCA pre 1942 car show in Ridgefield, Ct. in it together along with the Pierce-Arrow guy Don Gilbert.  The B & W photo is of the car in 1950.

SO many memories, so much information and way to much period photographs, literature, periodicals, show programs etc here.

Screen Shot 2021-02-11 at 2.30.15 PM.png

PackardLeBaroncoupe1934in1950001.jpg


Wonder where the wheel disk went. I was fortunate to play around with this car just a bit two or three years ago up in Maine. Interestingly it wasn’t to fix it. It was to measure it. It was going on display down south in an art museum, and they needed to know if it would fit on the elevator. We accurately measured it to the fraction on an inch........and it fit the elevator with about two inches to spare. For my money, I would have denied the cars placement in such a tight spot even though it was only for a brief change of floors. Credit must be given to the owner and collection manager for allowing the car to be displayed in such close and challenging circumstances. I have also had an opportunity to drive one of the others, and a good friend had been a caretaker of a third. This is the one Individual Custom Packard Twelve that never got me excited. It’s a fantastic car, but style wise it never spoke to me.

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The big car has been identified as a Haynes. Believe it or not, the car behind it is a Chandler! No small car itself, it is the big brother to the 1919 Cleveland I posted just above.

Both the Chandler and the Cleveland can sometimes be identified by the shape of the rear windows (lights) in the top, if the tops are up. Both are shaped like the marque badge, both sometimes referred to as a 'bowtie' shape. The Cleveland, in this case, if zoomed in really close, reveals the Cleveland variation of the bowtie on the hubcaps.

Not all Chandlers and Clevelands had the rear window with the distinctive shape. Chandlers sometimes as early as about 1917, and Cleveland beginning in 1919 (the first year), up until about 1926, had the special rear windows on SOME models and body styles, both open and enclosed. Why on some and not all? I have no idea. But I have seen era pictures both with and without the windows that way.

 

Again, This information is for both the Chandler in this photo, and the Cleveland in the previous post above.

 

bigHaynesnChandler.jpg

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8 hours ago, Gary_Ash said:

Here's how the replica of the Macauley Packard looked in December 2020, not progressing rapidly.  Wray Schelin in the foreground.  I'll be in the shop on Friday, can get more photos.

 

906951915_McAuleyPackardandWraySchelin.thumb.JPG.e44c98313ae60c6d620352c35cd5c7a2.JPG

 

 

Wray looks the same as he did 30 years ago. 

 

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6 hours ago, edinmass said:


Wonder where the wheel disk went.

 

That was the first thing I noticed, too. One of the three restored cars has the wheel discs, and it looks really cool with them on. I tend to agree with you a little bit in regards to styling, but through the decades of admiring all of the LeBarons, the coupe has grown on me, and I certainly would enjoy having one in my garage, and I would certainly enjoy driving it all over creation.

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