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Period images to relieve some of the stress


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2 hours ago, Walt G said:

Ok, I am back in this again - to much going on, so I am supposed to be retired..................hummmm.................

This is the interior of the WINTON factory machine shop

Next up the rear view of a Gardner series 136 6 cylinder sedan from 1930

Interior rear compartment of a Gardner series "140" sedan

Hupmobile(? not sure of model) roadster - painted on the gas tank it says Republic Tire

 

More to come later - the Gardener detail photos were sent to newspapers in hope that the auto editor would use them when the new cars made their debut thus

promoting their car even further. they are great for restoration purposes as they show details.

 

I have lots ( as in hundreds) of pre WWII era photographs of classic cars as well both domestic and European . Lets have your comments about what you observe here ( some viewers are not shy about doing that or perhaps they just want to rack up more numbers on their post listing???)

 

 

Wintonfactory001.jpg

 

 

 

Someone must have had a full-time job just maintaining all those sheaves, jackshafts, belts, and keeping those pillow-blocks greased!

 

Craig

Edited by 8E45E (see edit history)
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Craig, I agree. the maintenance crew in the factory indeed did "maintain" the machinery. NOTE all the machines are belt driven! not any electric cords plugged in anyplace.

To power the pulleys etc there would have been a furnace area in the factory that was fueled by coal.  The Franklin factory in Syracuse ,NY had a separate small power plant building at the center of their factory complex that was coal fired with tracks for trains to pull in and dump off their load of coal. I was there to see that place before it was leveled by dynamite.

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One last photo for today, I don't think I posted this here before but there are to many pages and images to recall now - hey who started all this open door to the past thread anyway? goofy stuff.

The car is a Locomoile , image is in the hard bound showroom album I have for the New York City dealership that was on the west side of Manhattan a few blocks off Broadway near Columbus Circle. Dual cowl, dual windshield touring car circa 1917. Designed by James Frank De Causse and built by Farnum & Nelson coach builders in Mass.  Pages of that album are absolutely huge and were printed on linen.

Locomobiledualcowl 1917.jpg

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17 minutes ago, Walt G said:

Craig, I agree. the maintenance crew in the factory indeed did "maintain" the machinery. NOTE all the machines are belt driven! not any electric cords plugged in anyplace.

To power the pulleys etc there would have been a furnace area in the factory that was fueled by coal.  The Franklin factory in Syracuse ,NY had a separate small power plant building at the center of their factory complex that was coal fired with tracks for trains to pull in and dump off their load of coal. I was there to see that place before it was leveled by dynamite.

Also of interest is that variable speed lathe with stepped diameter sheaves.  

 

Last time I was in a fully functional shop like that with open belt-driven machinery and a common jackshaft was back in 1964, where there were hardly any safety regulations in place regarding guards, etc.

 

Craig

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1 hour ago, Walt G said:

One last photo for today, I don't think I posted this here before but there are to many pages and images to recall now - hey who started all this open door to the past thread anyway? goofy stuff.

The car is a Locomoile , image is in the hard bound showroom album I have for the New York City dealership that was on the west side of Manhattan a few blocks off Broadway near Columbus Circle. Dual cowl, dual windshield touring car circa 1917. Designed by James Frank De Causse and built by Farnum & Nelson coach builders in Mass.  Pages of that album are absolutely huge and were printed on linen.

Locomobiledualcowl 1917.jpg

For what it's worth, I believe this photo was taken at Glyndor House, Wave Hill, Riverdale, NY.  "Glyndor" is partly obscured by the shrub in front of the pillar.  Awesome car!

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2 hours ago, 8E45E said:

Someone must have had a full-time job just maintaining all those sheaves, jackshafts, belts, and keeping those pillow-blocks greased!

 

I've seen old factory photos of filthy young boys (grease monkey's) with large oil cans and buckets of grease. Would guess they were lubing those line shafts and equipment. 

This taken from Wiktionary. https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/grease_monkey

 

Dates to at least 1928. May have originated during the Industrial Revolution in Great Britain when children were used to grease the large rotating axles which were used to transfer power from one centralized steam engine to all of the machines on the factory floor. These children, covered in grease and crawling in the tight spaces in the ceilings, were equated with monkeys.

 

 

 

 

Edited by Fossil (see edit history)
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1 hour ago, Fossil said:

I've seen old factory photos of filthy young boys (grease monkey's) with large oil cans and buckets of grease. Would guess they were lubing those line shafts and equipment. 

This taken from Wiktionary. https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/grease_monkey

 

Dates to at least 1928. May have originated during the Industrial Revolution in Great Britain when children were used to grease the large rotating axles which were used to transfer power from one centralized steam engine to all of the machines on the factory floor. These children, covered in grease and crawling in the tight spaces in the ceilings, were equated with monkeys.

 

 

 

 

There are still young boys & girls doing that to this day in certain countries where its allowed 'across the  Pacific Ocean'!!  

 

Craig

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2 hours ago, twin6 said:

The Sultan of Swat, aboard his 3rd series twin six.  Any thoughts on the body maker?

swat.jpeg

I know that Holbrook was not known for open roadsters, but that body tag is the same size and location that Holbrook placed them.   Holbrook was also located in New York. I vote for Holbrook.

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Sure looks like Tom Hibbard’s work before LeBaron had their own body manufacturing facilities.  I’ll take a stab at the builder.....Demarest. Roadsters were their specialty, and the double rear spare was also.

Edited by edinmass (see edit history)
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17 hours ago, Walt G said:

One last photo for today, I don't think I posted this here before but there are to many pages and images to recall now - hey who started all this open door to the past thread anyway? goofy stuff.

The car is a Locomoile , image is in the hard bound showroom album I have for the New York City dealership that was on the west side of Manhattan a few blocks off Broadway near Columbus Circle. Dual cowl, dual windshield touring car circa 1917. Designed by James Frank De Causse and built by Farnum & Nelson coach builders in Mass.  Pages of that album are absolutely huge and were printed on linen.

Locomobiledualcowl 1917.jpg

Fortuitously, we still have one still extant so we can appreciate in person what a marvelous car and body design was created.

'17 Locomobile dual cowl - McAlpin - B & W.jpg

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4 minutes ago, 58L-Y8 said:

Fortuitously, we still have one still extant so we can appreciate in person what a marvelous car and body design was created.

'17 Locomobile dual cowl - McAlpin - B & W.jpg

 

A few years back he brought this to the Eastern Grand Classic and knowing crap about Locomobile I noticed it and ran right over.   Really nice guy and we had a great discussion on the car.   From upstate NY and he did the restoration back to original colors (yep!) in his barn.

 

IMG_5820.thumb.JPG.73b94ee9923bce58b8315

 

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I had some great communication with the owner of that car who did a amazing restoration . There is another in the midwest as well that gets driven on a regular basis out there as well. Beautiful dinosaurs indeed. Most collectors reading this will have no idea how heavy that radiator and shell is to move around. I have one I am working on to display in my garage that I bought from Austin Clark 40+ years ago at one of his "Iron Range Days" ( that was a parts sale by invitation) at his auto museum in Southampton.  Some how that radiator seemed to be easier to move then then it does now..................

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18 hours ago, Walt G said:

Craig, I agree. the maintenance crew in the factory indeed did "maintain" the machinery. NOTE all the machines are belt driven! not any electric cords plugged in anyplace.

I don't see any electrical service anywhere in that photo. 

 

Any lighting in that plant was most likely gas or kerosene (probably gas, looking at the small diameter pipes at ceiling height).  Electrical in that era would have been the old exposed 'knob & tube' wiring that ran along the ceiling or wall, and appliances would have been directly hard-wired to it.  I don't think plug-in, or screw-in appliances as we know them today didn't come into existence until just before the first world war.

 

Craig

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23 minutes ago, Walt G said:

I had some great communication with the owner of that car who did a amazing restoration . There is another in the midwest as well that gets driven on a regular basis out there as well. Beautiful dinosaurs indeed. Most collectors reading this will have no idea how heavy that radiator and shell is to move around. I have one I am working on to display in my garage that I bought from Austin Clark 40+ years ago at one of his "Iron Range Days" ( that was a parts sale by invitation) at his auto museum in Southampton.  Some how that radiator seemed to be easier to move then then it does now..................

 

Yes!

 

There is a great video on youtube of the other car.

 

 

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