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Period images to relieve some of the stress


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5 hours ago, LCK81403 said:

Standard motor car for sure.  In the time period of the garage photo, about 1913 or so, the Standard had a unique radiator shroud that was similar to the later Minerva.  The green color Standard is a 1913 Model S.  The '22 Minerva has a similar looking radiator shroud but is physically larger than the Standard's.

Standard.jpg

13 Standard Model S Tourer.jpg

22 Minerva Salmon & Sons 03-13.jpg

 

 

An even earlier Standard - circa 1907-09 - outside the premises of JS Hawkes in Gloucester St, Christchurch, New Zealand circa 1910.

 

 

JS Hawkes Ltd, Gloucester St,Christchurch (2).jpg

JS Hawkes Ltd, Gloucester St,Christchurch.jpg

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These two photos are not really 'period images' but I happened across them in my files. Two photos taken 50 years apart - 1965 and 2015. Same car, same owner. Some may be familiar with Brian Rankine who owns Doble E13. I don't know him personally but Barry Barnes, who took both photos 50 years apart I think does.

 

 

Brian Rankine Stutz at Milford in 65 B Barnes photo.jpg

Brain Rankine Stutz at Mt Cook 2015 B Barnes photo.jpg

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1 hour ago, 29 Chandler said:

1915 Chandler Closed car

IMG_5098.jpg

Chris, I believe the body on this car was designed and built by the Willoughby Company of Utica, N.Y. I have additional photos of the car under construction, interior, etc.

35+ years ago I purchased a huge collection of Willoughby period photographs at an antique show on Rt.20 just south of Utica, N.Y. a short distance from where the factory was and the Willoughby family resided. Among the items were Francis Willoughby's personal photo albums of the bodies his company built that are bound and signed by him in fountain pen. Many other makes are represented and I shared one of a Cole automobile with someone here who then posted it and did not give me credit as to where it came from (!!!!) - I will not share any further photos of any Willoughby bodied cars because of this . They will eventually form the basis for an in depth history of the company that will be published in a periodical . The AACA magazine would be perfect for this but I have been informed that it is impossible to find room for articles of 4 or more pages in any of the issues of that magazine.

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A story with a tragic ending. In 1917 Cecil Hill was brought to New Zealand from England to be chief flying instructor at the new Sockburn aerodrome on the outskirts of Christchurch. It late became Wigram airbase - later home of the well-known annual Lady Wigram Trophy car race from 1949 - and was closed in the 1990s. It was basically swallowed up by the city and is now a housing development.

 

Cecil Hill brought his own car with him, a 1912 (French) Vermorel. The tragic end came in February 1919 when he was demonstrating a locally built aircraft.

 

Christchurch crowd's horrified silence as stuntman's plane plummeted - NZ Herald

 

 

17 circa Cecil Hill first instructor Sockburn died Feb 19 crash 12 Vermorel car.jpg

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26 minutes ago, Walt G said:

Chris, I believe the body on this car was designed and built by the Willoughby Company of Utica, N.Y. I have additional photos of the car under construction, interior, etc.

35+ years ago I purchased a huge collection of Willoughby period photographs at an antique show on Rt.20 just south of Utica, N.Y. a short distance from where the factory was and the Willoughby family resided. Among the items were Francis Willoughby's personal photo albums of the bodies his company built that are bound and signed by him in fountain pen. Many other makes are represented and I shared one of a Cole automobile with someone here who then posted it and did not give me credit as to where it came from (!!!!) - I will not share any further photos of any Willoughby bodied cars because of this . They will eventually form the basis for an in depth history of the company that will be published in a periodical . The AACA magazine would be perfect for this but I have been informed that it is impossible to find room for articles of 4 or more pages in any of the issues of that magazine.

That is very interesting Walt. I always believed that the sedan that Chandler reported to have offered in 1914 was made by Willoughby and looked much different than the 1915 body. Now I think it is very likely there were the same model. This is the only picture of a Chandler Sedan this early that I have been able to find. You and I corresponded a few years ago about a sedan body I had sitting on a 1920 Chandler frame. I had thought that might have been the Chandler Willoughby sedan. Based on this information I am confident it was built for some other make, maybe Cole as the only gauge in the dash was labeled Cole.

 

I very much look forward to your article. Its a shame the AACA magazine cannot find room for it.

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Hi Chris, I do recall our exchange of information about the sedan body on the Chandler chassis you have some years ago. It is hard to decide sometimes what chassis a coach built body is on. A loop magnifying glass is perhaps a help if one can read the hubcap lettering! I learned this and used to do it when I worked for Austin Clark in his library and we were trying to do a project he had an inquiry on. Lots of eye strain and headaches ( still!) but it can put a name to what a car is. This goes for body builder tags on car - they are even harder to see then hubcap lettering! Fortunately many period photos have written on the back in pencil the type of car and sometimes the body.

All this research takes time, there is no instant answer at the press of a button. Fortunately many prints for photos were made with glass plate negatives ( some over 9 x 10 inches in size) and they can be wonderful for detail

Walt

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3 hours ago, twin6 said:

Col King Stanley.jpg

Looks like "Grandpa" Stanley's 1913 Chandler was retired and replaced with a 1925 Cleveland with the "OneShot" oil system for the chassis. Cleveland cars were an off shoot of Chandler to offer a range of cars in the lower price market.

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On 1/23/2021 at 2:24 PM, edinmass said:

Ok boys........comments on this one please.Year, Make, and Body Builder.

4FEE77DF-CDBA-45C7-A9EB-D158A347D3F2.png

Better late than never... I had to do some digging.  Believe this to be a Packard 3rd series 8 (1927), with owner Florence Powers on board.  Body possibly by Locke?

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23 minutes ago, twin6 said:

Better late than never... I had to do some digging.  Believe this to be a Packard 3rd series 8 (1927), with owner Florence Powers on board.  Body possibly by Locke?

 

 

I was told its a French body.....makes sense with the Arch de Triumph in the background. Hood doesn't look like anything American I have ever seen. See photo caption below, factory archive from Packard.......

 

 

 

 

Packard Co. file photograph of a 1927 Packard right side view, light in color, top lowered, female standing on running board. Inscribed on photo back: "Packard 343, third series eight, 8-cylinder, 106-horsepower, 143-inch wheelbase, 2/4-person special runabout and/or roadster, note right-hand drive, see lady's hand on steering wheel, bulb horn & drum type spot light mounted at right: tail lamp, 6-lug wheels, tail lamp of type introduced on third series eight, wing nut securing spare wheels to the support arm, drum-type spot light, unusual hood louvers, coach builder's plate on body sill at cowl base, Mrs. Walter Powers, photographed in Paris, France."

 

Edited by edinmass (see edit history)
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I would like to give some people I know several hundred dollars in cash, if they get in line and spend it purchasing brains.......even at twenty five cents per serving.............three hundred dollars probably won’t even get them to the point of remembering to put the trash out once a week. 

34C87776-FF22-4EA8-932F-2F350E7BBEFA.png

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6 minutes ago, edinmass said:

get them to the point of remembering to put the trash out once a week. 

Or paying their bills. 

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8 hours ago, edinmass said:


I would like to give some people I know several hundred dollars in cash, if they get in line and spend it purchasing brains.......even at twenty five cents per serving.............three hundred dollars probably won’t even get them to the point of remembering to put the trash out once a week. 

34C87776-FF22-4EA8-932F-2F350E7BBEFA.png

I seem to recall seeing that photo in National Lampoon on their 'True Facts' page!!

 

Craig

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That makes me think of the old saying”you’re just throwing good money after bad!”  I’m sure we have all heard that before when we’ve hauled some old cars home but it would really apply to your idea Ed. Besides a few hundred dollars would not make a dent in today’s world. 
dave s 

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3 hours ago, Jerry with a Packard said:

I hope this is not off topic too far. My car from high school and college. 65 Skylark Gran Sport. Sister in foreground and I am washing the 68 Charger R/T in the background.

IMG_2730.JPG

Beautiful Buick!  I had a '66 Skylark GS in high school after losing my '29 Chevy in an accident.  The story I was told was that the Service Manger at Key Buick in Jacksonville, FL.  Kind'a souped up the car with two 4-barrels, 4-speed, headers, cam, etc.  I was the third owner and never lost a street race!  From a fuel injected

327 Corvette., to a brand new (at the time) '69 Impala 427 under-cover cop car.  Against the 'Vette I got a ticket for reckless driving and against the Impala cop car

I got one hell-of-a dressing down for speeding.  The cop was off duty and he was showing off his new "ride" to his buddy.  We got up to about 120 MPH and he just couldn't take me.  Man 'o man did I ever get a thrill.  First from beating him and second time when he flashed his badge on me when we came up to a stoplight.  No ticket,

but you talk about a scared high school kid.

 

Capt. Harley😉

 

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12 hours ago, 1937hd45 said:

 

Bob,  we have talked about it in other threads.  It goes by a number of different names including "Thompson Special" and "Glasscock" special.  Built on a 29 chassis it does not exist although a replica does.

GlasscockSpeedster.JPG

GlasscockSpeedster2.JPG

Edited by alsancle (see edit history)
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Ok, I am back in this again - to much going on, so I am supposed to be retired..................hummmm.................

This is the interior of the WINTON factory machine shop

Next up the rear view of a Gardner series 136 6 cylinder sedan from 1930

Interior rear compartment of a Gardner series "140" sedan

Hupmobile(? not sure of model) roadster - painted on the gas tank it says Republic Tire

 

More to come later - the Gardener detail photos were sent to newspapers in hope that the auto editor would use them when the new cars made their debut thus

promoting their car even further. they are great for restoration purposes as they show details.

 

I have lots ( as in hundreds) of pre WWII era photographs of classic cars as well both domestic and European . Lets have your comments about what you observe here ( some viewers are not shy about doing that or perhaps they just want to rack up more numbers on their post listing???)

 

 

Wintonfactory001.jpg

Gardner1930rear001.jpg

Gardner1930interior001.jpg

HUPProadster001.jpg

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Love the photos of the old factory interiors. The more detailed the better. 

The interior photo of that Gardner is super. 

 

 

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