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Period images to relieve some of the stress


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1 minute ago, E-116-YH said:

It is a Weyman bodied L-29 Cord with Woodlite head lamps.

Thanks! 

 

I knew it was a Weyman body, but couldn't see enough of the front to surely identify the make.

 

Craig

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Bob, the L29 Cord I believe has a Weyman fabric body, and I think survived and was on the cover of the AACA magazine many years ago (?) in restored condition. Car may now reside in a collection in Europe.  Perhaps this was the car owned in the 1950s by Herbert Lozier of Brooklyn ( then of Huntington, L.I. ) who was an author ( did a book on M-B) and builder of scratch built models . I have/own his pre WWII  period photograph collection ( of cars on display at the London and Paris motor shows) I bought from him many many decades ago as well as a great huge scratch built 1925-27 Packard touring car he made. I will try to look all this up to share here when I complete other commitments for research and stories I have made.  Just not enough hours in the day to get all I want done.  Since the pandemic many car enthusiasts are starved for something interesting to read or look at that they haven't seen before because we all can't attend car shows, cruise nights, club meetings ( local and national) etc . It is why I started this thread on period Images to keep everyone's interest somewhat satisfied . In exactly 2 months this thread will be a year old!

Walt

PS the sedan I believe is a Jordan Speedway series car.

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Yes, the 1930 Jordan Speedway Model Z Sportman sedan.  More progressive design details, features and nascent 3-box sedan proportions in one group of twelve hand-built cars by a dying company than found or presented elsewhere at the time.  Worst of all, none survive and the author of that stunning design concept is lost to history.

'30 Jordan Speedway Z Sportsman b.png

'30 Jordan Speedway Z Sportsman Sedan three-quarter rear.jpg

Edited by 58L-Y8
And 'or' and 3/4 rear view (see edit history)
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twin6,

I love that "snake horn"! I don't see many of those in era photographs. I have probably seen as many of them on restored cars myself than in original era photos. 

 

1937hd45, Bob,

I don't think I ever saw a 'cross engine' Franklin quite like that one before! Looks like a home-brew sedan of sorts. I knew a fellow that owned and restored a couple of those many years ago. Not many were built before 1905, but as I recall, one of his was. Another of his was a 1906. He loved the thing, but was annoyed that it was so underpowered it made a lousy tour car. West coast one and two cylinder groups would not allow him to participate in their tours with it, and it couldn't keep up with anything else. He had maybe eight to ten Franklins, ranging from 1904 into the late 1920s (his 1915 was beautiful!). He had a few other interesting cars as well, including a two cylinder that he did use on 1&2 tours.

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6 hours ago, 58L-Y8 said:

Yes, the 1930 Jordan Speedway Model Z Sportman sedan.  More progressive design details, features and nascent 3-box sedan proportions in one group of twelve hand-built cars by a dying company than found or presented elsewhere at the time.  Worst of all, none survive and the author of that stunning design concept is lost to history.

'30 Jordan Speedway Z Sportsman b.png

'30 Jordan Speedway Z Sportsman Sedan three-quarter rear.jpg

Those 'no-clog' running boards would perhaps be more fitting on a truck. 

 

They'll be perfect for someone wearing workboots on a construction site, but not for a lady wearing high heels.

 

Craig 

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Bob again,

Interesting! I think that is the earliest photo I have seen of clamp on steel wheeled sidewalk skates! Roller skating actually goes way back into the late 1800s. One of Charlie Chaplin's most famous EARLY films largely takes place in a roller rink, and ends up outside (the Rink, 1916). Roller rink wheels in those days were wood. Somewhere amongst all my junk is a very nice very old pair of wooden wheeled roller rink shoe skates. I don't know the true age of them, however the patent dates are all early 1900s.

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49 minutes ago, 8E45E said:

Those 'no-clog' running boards would perhaps be more fitting on a truck. 

 

They'll be perfect for someone wearing workboots on a construction site, but not for a lady wearing high heels.

 

Craig 


I agree with Craig.......interesting design, but far from attractive or important in the world of automobiles. It’s a great example of one off coachwork that if still in existence it would get an automatic spot on the 18th green at Pebble. The bigger question is would it or could it win? I think it would suffer defeat in the CCCA Closed class. Unusual does not equal iconic.

 

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Yes, not perfect but consider the advancements embodied in this Jordan Speedway Z Sportman sedan"

1) The 3-Box sedan configuration wherein the lower body with integrated trunk is treated as a solid mass, the greenhouse setting on top of it, the future dominant sedan configuration that would finally come to production in the 1938 Cadillac 60 Special.

2) The over-the-cowl, full-length hood, before those by LeBaron et al.

3) The dropped lower sill without breaks defining a separate frame cover.

4) The front fender valances brought closer to the front bumper.

5) The long horizontal hood doors, although already seen elsewhere, but emphasizing the streamlined appearance.

6) The raked windshield angle and lack of visor.

7) Although novel, the free-standing airfoil running boards.

😎 The clean, lack of hood ornament.

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Great photo of the car.  But what is with that service motorcycle?  There are two rubber tires mounted on steel rims, fixed to the rear end of the motorcycle.  Those two wheels can not be used on the car nor the motorcycle, hence what are they for?

32 Oldsmobile 002.jpg

Service cycle.jpg

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1 hour ago, E-116-YH said:

Hello Captain Harley,

                                             I believe it is a 1932 Oldsmobile like the attached images.

57f31e9f64192_32_oldsroofsnaps_f32_15.jpg.d81e20b9b74abe896c3c2cc1d1d5b670.jpg

 

104984787_10158824098207189_5392087785420498198_n.jpg

E-116-YH,

 

Thanks you and I would say you are correct.  I knew it was a GM product just not sure which one.  It most be the same car (and babe...or should I say Doll...) in the two original pictures.  I'm thing about making the black & white pic the screen saver on my PC.  I love staring at the picture and trying to decide which one I like best.  The car or the girl!  Vavavooom..........

 

Capt.Harley😉

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6 minutes ago, LCK81403 said:

Great photo of the car.  But what is with that service motorcycle?  There are two rubber tires mounted on steel rims, fixed to the rear end of the motorcycle.  Those two wheels can not be used on the car nor the motorcycle, hence what are they for?

32 Oldsmobile 002.jpg

Service cycle.jpg

The dealership would deliver the car back to the owner. Hook the motorcycle to the back bumper (see hitch on the front of M.C.). Attach or flop down the 2 training wheels on the M.C. so when towed it would stand straight up. Drop off the car, unhitch the M.C. from the rear bumper of the car, flip up the training wheels and back to the dealership on the M.C.

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21 hours ago, LCK81403 said:

Early collision safety test.  Vehicle type unidentified.  Surely are a lot of engineers observing this test.

19894757_639509656255512_5884550987273498372_n.jpg

It would be most convenient to have this rig at Hershey , a perfect way to get a good view of the entire flea market field and while in flight make notes in the great program/directory of vendors as to what parts and pieces are where you want to return to see - that is if you survive the landing and impact , not sure if you would bounce upon hitting the ground and if so how many times. 😬

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Here’s a couple of photos from one of our old family albums. The first is dated 1926. I think that it is a REO Model T-6. It may be a 1926 model, but I really don’t know how to tell the year of the vehicle.    The second photo might be a 1937 Plymouth (first year with a vent window). I really like the side profile of this one. Neither one of these are high-end classics, but they would surely be typical of what you would have seen on the road back “in the day”.

Bob

37AF5914-F984-4159-B892-7D28309F3A02.jpeg

E1FB312E-9EF0-45FF-88FA-F3B5F3CB34D8.jpeg

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Bob, the '37 Plymouth photo is interesting.  It appears to have a longer rear section when compared with the attached photo of a '37 Plymouth coupe.  The longer rear section probably provides room for the rumble seat.  On the car in your old photo there appears to be a step plate on the rear fender to facilitate climbing access to the rumble seat.  On the top of the trunk lid there appears to be a handle for the rumble seat door, said door opening to the rear.  The rumble seat in various car makes continued into the mid- and later-1930s, although their popularity waned.  Hudson and Hupmobile were several car makes that continued to produce rumble seat variants.  Attached is a photo of a 1937 maroon color Hupmobile that fairly approximates your '37 Plymouth.

37 Plymouth.jpg

37 Plymouth Coupe 03-12.jpg

37 Hupmobile 618 01-01.jpg

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Ah so.  Thanks for enlightening me about the service motorcycle.  I guess I missed the memo about that.  And now, seeing the cycle attached to the car, I see where the idea for the modern biker's "trike" originated.

IMG_15796432929913.thumb.jpg.db42405354597c9946d899fa2f48abe8.jpg

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