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Period images to relieve some of the stress


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12 minutes ago, George Cole said:

Women welders at Lincoln Motor Company 1918.

Women Welders at Lincoln Motor Company in 1918.jpg


They are actually soldering........Liberty aircraft cylinder water jackets on to the castings. A difficult and tedious job........there was a reason they hired women to do this process........but it was not how shall we say reasonable or politically correct.

 

Edited by edinmass (see edit history)
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2 minutes ago, edinmass said:


They are actually soldering........Liberty aircraft cylinder water jackets on to the castings. A difficult and tedious job........there was a reason they hired women to do this process........but it was not how shall we say reasonable or politically correct.

 

Cheap labor...but the high lead content in the solder and gases from the process...well.

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Women in manufacturing was more than cheap labor during the Great War. Production had to be ramped up for the war effort at the same time much of the labor force was being sent off to war. Unlike World War II, women workers were mostly sent back to their "domestic duties" after the earlier war ended.

As for the serious health effects of soldering? Those weren't fully understood yet in those days. And even today, they are not taken seriously enough. Just how much lead is carried in soldering smoke? I don't think it has been carefully studied? I would doubt that much actual lead is carried in the smoke. However, I do take care with ventilation,  and usually keep the air flowing the smoke away from me. The bigger danger is getting lead residue on one's hands, and then ingesting that. Then and now, some sensible care should be taken. I have done soldering my whole life (well, at least since I was eight!). I have made thousands of circuit boards for emerging technologies (my dad was a cable television pioneer). Repaired my first radiator by the time I was twelve, and a fair number of them since (been working on one for my '15 model T for the past week!). I also serviced and repaired another couple thousand circuit boards building and repairing communications systems for about thirty years. If I start (?) acting strange? Maybe that will be my excuse?

Most toxic lead poisoning has been through ingestion, not breathing. Still, some care NEEDS to be taken! Enough breathing of vapors can become a serious health risk if some steps are not taken.

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More road construction......all cars are White steamers....1904-1906, before you had union road builders.......you had convict labor.

 

Sorry about the quality of the photos......but they are worth looking at.

 

 

IMG_1105.jpg

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IMG_1107.jpg

Edited by edinmass (see edit history)
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This photo was taken in late 1929. Interesting they are using real steam rollers at that time......probably city owned although they may have belonged to the GC, and kept in service till the war. The only reason to take them out of service was a lack of boiler men available to run them.

IMG_1104.jpg

Edited by edinmass (see edit history)
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2 hours ago, George Cole said:

Most expensive kind of hood ornament.

73365c392dc1c7d79f0c4e630ca42c73.jpg

I would like to have both the ornament and the car in my possession, in that order. The ornament could fit other cars in my collection, and even it it didn't fit well would be a joy to have about close by to admire .

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It's just great that a bevy of dance academy students could help promote the 1932 Nash...and go all the way up to Mt. Rainier National Park for the photo shoot. I've been to that spot but do not recall any of that going on.

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1 hour ago, 58L-Y8 said:

During the late '20's / early '30's, these dancing nymphs around new cars were popular.

'32 Nash Ambassador promo photo by Asahel Curtis.jpg

I wonder if the AACA judging standards team is contemplating a similar performance for the annual Elegance at Hershey event, or perhaps the senior cars to be judged at Hershey next October. Add this to the special ornament  lady shown earlier .  What a great way to have a grand opening for the new AACA headquarters as well.

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3 hours ago, edinmass said:

More road construction......all cars are White steamers....1904-1906, before you had union road builders.......you had convict labor.

 

Sorry about the quality of the photos......but they are worth looking at.

 

 

IMG_1105.jpg

IMG_1104.jpg

IMG_1106.jpg

IMG_1107.jpg

The White in the picture with the people In stripes is a model GA,    G for gas A for first model  1909 to 1912. Truck in next picture is not a White.

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I knew the truck was not a White, I commented just the cars. The GA was labeled as a steamer car......I claim no expertise on White cars, except the later series Dual Valve. Thanks for the correction. I have a huge archive of White cars and truck stuff from day one to 1943.

Edited by edinmass (see edit history)
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3 hours ago, edinmass said:

More road construction......all cars are White steamers....1904-1906, before you had union road builders.......you had convict labor.

 

Sorry about the quality of the photos......but they are worth looking at.

 

 

IMG_1105.jpg

IMG_1104.jpg

IMG_1106.jpg

IMG_1107.jpg

 

 

I think the top one with the Convict labor is a gas model White,

not a steam model.

 

Greg

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1 hour ago, Walt G said:

I wonder if the AACA judging standards team is contemplating a similar performance for the annual Elegance at Hershey event, or perhaps the senior cars to be judged at Hershey next October. Add this to the special ornament  lady shown earlier .  What a great way to have a grand opening for the new AACA headquarters as well.

I think the young ladies would be a little older now and probably would say that is just too politically incorrect! 

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On 12/2/2020 at 1:55 AM, 8E45E said:

Ford Consul 315.

 

The hardtop was the cool looking Capri.

 

Craig

Cheers

think the saloon was badged ‘classic’ in the Uk , didn’t see many  capris liked them though  , however had a 3.0s in the seventies beast of a car  apple green , deck chair striped seats !

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2 hours ago, Pilgrim65 said:

Cheers

think the saloon was badged ‘classic’ in the Uk , didn’t see many  capris liked them though  , however had a 3.0s in the seventies beast of a car  apple green , deck chair striped seats !

I had 62 Consul Classic 315 sedan.  It had a reverse slope rear window like Mercurys of the period.  The result was a huge trunk.  I carried a spare engine and transmission for my 27 Dictator home in that trunk.

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Thanks Bob, I thought I may be the only one that noticed this , but recently under another topic was taken to task about being not fair in my comment so have refrained for the most part from further participation in anything here , contribution or comment wise. If I stated lets get back on topic for the era as well as subject someone will be highly offended.

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