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Period images to relieve some of the stress


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2 hours ago, edinmass said:

I had my glasses on George. But the damn phone is so small I couldn’t tell. The size of the doors made me think it was a small car. If there’s no front brakes it must be a series 33.

I was looking on the big screen.  The 40% coverage of louvers on the hood side panel says Series 33, plus I'm pretty sure they didn't use S80s.  Incidentally, S33 and S80 brake components are identical, which is why S80s stop so well.  Pierce also made retrofit kits to convert 2-wheel-brake S33s to 4-wheel brakes, so I have trouble understanding why this car hadn't been converted by 1931.  Going down the hill with a full load and 2-wheel brakes must have been exciting!

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Great photos Ed. This is just a guess but I think the vessel is the USS Mayflower, the Presidential yacht. The date is 1917.

 

IMG_1914.thumb.jpg.1aee68f54f4312d02bb9593bd53bd491.jpg

 

It seems to have something to do with the visit of these two French officers, I presume War Heroes because both have the Croix de Guerre and the one on the right also has been decorated with the Legion of Honor.  Neither are senior officers and they could be aviators. In WWI the French aviation service did not have a specific uniform. Members wore the uniform of the branch of service they came from and these were frequently somewhat different. As the war progressed, and men joined from civilian life, they had no "old uniform" to wear and, because there was no official uniform, they could wear whatever uniform they liked best.

 

IMG_1913.thumb.jpg.8e8a4cf685259e91808d6bd501ffef41.jpg

 

This even will be recorded somewhere and some further digging will probably reveal who they were. Everyone in the background is in US uniform, including the drivers so we can be pretty sure they are in the US. One of the cars has a little two-flag device on the radiator cap with French and US flags.

Edited by JV Puleo (see edit history)
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I origionally listed this as Murphy........a more experienced eye suggested Judkins; which I am sure is correct....since he owns one! 

 

Thanks to my Sensei for putting me on the correct path!

 

 

 

 

.126900522_1116619475456975_6733967530527160272_o.thumb.jpg.5c715fcefbf18174f7fd4cce0315490e.jpg

Edited by edinmass (see edit history)
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14 hours ago, JV Puleo said:

Great photos Ed. This is just a guess but I think the vessel is the USS Mayflower, the Presidential yacht. The date is 1917.

 

IMG_1914.thumb.jpg.1aee68f54f4312d02bb9593bd53bd491.jpg

 

It seems to have something to do with the visit of these two French officers, I presume War Heroes because both have the Croix de Guerre and the one on the right also has been decorated with the Legion of Honor.  Neither are senior officers and they could be aviators. In WWI the French aviation service did not have a specific uniform. Members wore the uniform of the branch of service they came from and these were frequently somewhat different. As the war progressed, and men joined from civilian life, they had no "old uniform" to wear and, because there was no official uniform, they could wear whatever uniform they liked best.

 

IMG_1913.thumb.jpg.8e8a4cf685259e91808d6bd501ffef41.jpg

 

This even will be recorded somewhere and some further digging will probably reveal who they were. Everyone in the background is in US uniform, including the drivers so we can be pretty sure they are in the US. One of the cars has a little two-flag device on the radiator cap with French and US flags.

 

 

Correct......I have the names somewhere, but just not at hand. 

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37 minutes ago, Walt G said:

Angelo, thank you so much. Love the photos !!!, especially the one of the Isotta Fraschini town car with the Fleetwood body.

Walt

There is a caption on the back of the photo and if I remember correctly, it states the pictured woman is actress Nita Naldi and the IS town car is credited to Valentino's ownership.

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7 minutes ago, Angelo VanBogart said:

There is a caption on the back of the photo and if I remember correctly, it states the pictured woman is actress Nita Naldi and the IS town car is credited to Valentino's ownership.

I do see a cobra on the radiator, Valentino's style.

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Yes, the town car was bought by Valentino who also ordered a roadster by Fleetwood that is a famous car that has received a lot of press, repaint in non original colors etc BUT Valentino never took delivery of the roadster - he passed away before it was finished. So although ordered and built for him was never driven by him to my knowledge. That car was bought by a fellow who worked for I-F of New York and for decades was used by him to attend local car shows here on the western end of long island. Joe Gaeta lived in the Manorhaven section of Port Washington , NY and was a great guy. As a teenager I spoke to him often and he would ask me to sit and talk to him as no younger people even heard of an Isotta Fraschini ( nor really knew how to pronounce the cars name) . Joe fitted RR Phantom I or Ghost pedal pads to the clutch and brake pedals because ones with IF cast into them were not available and the original ones on the car dried out and fell off after 30+ years. So the car had RR pedal pads.

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Walt, I found these two photos on a search for the Roadster. There was a maroon and silver Isotta Cabriolet from Long Island that used to come up to Ridgefield, think the owner was a postal worker. Last time I saw it it was jet black and on the lawn at Pebble Beach. 

Rudolph-Valentino-and-his-mid-1920s-Isotta-Fraschini-Town-Car-1080x606.jpg

Rudolph-Valentino-Tipo-8A-Isotta-Fraschini-760x696.jpg

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14 minutes ago, Angelo VanBogart said:

And here it is after a fender bender at a railroad crossing.

rudolph-valentino-10-photographs_1_f43a91a106736f051bf54269539f8c23.jpg

 

 

This photo just knocked off 25 percent at the auction next time it goes up for sale...........

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Ed, can agree BUT that won't happen if the sign in front of the car goes along with the car at the auction along with an authentic period signed letter from one of Mr. Valentino's paramours that the fancy clothing undergarments found buried/lodged in the rear armrest were indeed part of the cars heritage .... hey we are talking about automotive history here!

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Does anyone know the history of this accident?  The front bumper is caved in a little at dead center, possibly from striking the post of the railroad crossing sign.  That slight damage does not seem to match the destruction of the crossing sign.  There appears to be no damage to the headlights nor radiator shroud.  Yet with so little damage to the front of the car the right front wheel appears to be splayed out indicating either damage to the axle, or simply that the tire was stripped off its rim.  The right rear tire appears to be sunken into the dirt surface possibly indicating "soft shoulder" at the edge of the road surface.  Hence this accident possibly resulted from too much speed, a slick (wet mud?) road surface, and a curve in the road approaching the rail crossing.  ?

Isotta-Fraschini Town Car Rudolph Valentino 01-02.jpg

Isotta-Fraschini Town Car Rudolph Valentino 01-03.jpg

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I just HAD to go out and look at it. The amazing thing is it only took a few minutes to find it amongst all my junk. For about fifty years, I have had a Raulang Body tag, and I knew it was an oval. Looking at it closely for the first time in a decade or two, I would say it is likely a rounder oval than the body tag on that neat looking roadster. So I would say body by Fisher and/or Fleetwood is still more likely.

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Eric Hatch was an automotive author who penned a regular column for the society magazine Country Life in the 1920s. Country Life Press was a branch of Doubleday, Doran & Company, a major publisher at the time that was based on Franklin Avenue in Garden City , NY on the east side of the road. This image of a Minerva conv. sedan with body by Hibbard & Darrin was in the Feb. 1928 issue.

MIN1928CountryLIFE001.jpg

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I had a drink with Hibbard's grandson last Sunday..........nice guy. He asked why my White(Rubay body, Hibbard's first job.) looked like a Duesenberg LeBaron Phaeton, and I said, because your grandfather designed this car while he was still a teenager. He had a big smile on his face. It's amazing who you bump into in Southern Florida. 

Edited by edinmass (see edit history)
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The advertisement is from the 1937 George Vanderbilt Cup race held at the Roosevelt Raceway in 1937 in Westbury, NY. this raceway was in the area where Lindbergh flew off/over to head east to Paris a decade before. The print of the open coupe is from a series of images given to me by a great friend in CCCA some years ago as a gift and was one of the Hibbard designs. More stuff from my archives.

hibbardiNCadVERTISEMENT1936iMAGE6.jpg

HIBBARDCOUPEOPEN1936image4.jpg

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That period photo really makes you appreciate the size of the car ( and the wheels/tires for scale) , think about the size of a man driving it and judge/compare  against the size of the buildings behind it.

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7 minutes ago, edinmass said:

This is why your brass car steers like sxxt today. No need to rebuild the box, the car is low mileage! 1909 Glidden Tour with a Pierce Arrow.

6CE5A16E-0EBB-4F01-8AD1-8CAAA39756F2.png

Yep, and perhaps they were a little shy on hardening technology (at least in automobiles).  As dad says about many 30's cars - it was worn out at 30K miles (by the way if you work here in Cincinnati at Procter & Gamble, then I would have to say 30M for thirty thousand and MM is million). 

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11 minutes ago, John_Mereness said:

As dad says about many 30's cars - it was worn out at 30K miles (by the way if you work here in Cincinnati at Procter & Gamble, then I would have to say 30M for thirty thousand and MM is million). 

So when the ashtray was full, it was time to get rid of it?

 

Craig

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