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Period images to relieve some of the stress


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ED, great photos! the fellows posed before the cars give you an excellent reference on how to dress in proper attire when you take the car out for a ride or even better when you attend and AACA national meet Like Hershey next year !

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On 11/13/2020 at 1:14 PM, edinmass said:

Wayne, I have the story........in detail. I will post how to look it up soon.

 

1915-1917 Franco-Anglo Financial Commission............

 

The beginning of the story is here - the story is mostly 1915-16 but I guess it was ongoing - but the visible plate on the White car on the right of the photo is 1917 (what state is that?). Were the plates issued mid year to mid year as they were here in NZ?

 

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Anglo-French_Financial_Commission

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On 11/14/2020 at 10:25 AM, 30DodgePanel said:

 

If they were going for sex appeal they nailed it...  especially with the dirt field back drop and all ;) 

 

Beautiful car !


What car?

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1 hour ago, nzcarnerd said:

 

The beginning of the story is here - the story is mostly 1915-16 but I guess it was ongoing - but the visible plate on the White car on the right of the photo is 1917 (what state is that?). Were the plates issued mid year to mid year as they were here in NZ?

 

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Anglo-French_Financial_Commission


It ran till 1918. They toured all the bases looking at equipment and the men coming over. There is a book documenting the tour......with lots of photos.

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On 11/12/2020 at 7:57 PM, Tph479 said:

574 ci V12 engine

E41DD277-5B5A-4625-858A-6798E3573304.jpeg

 

Just a guess, 

but I believe the photo is more recent than the Hisso-

 

The car would have been in manufacture between 1931 - 1938, as I recall.

The cheesecake appears dressed in 1950s, or even early 1960s style.

 

Either way, both might be considered fast and attractive.

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7 hours ago, 1937hd45 said:

This was on the HAMB today, unique upholstery, someone can ID the car I'm sure. Bob 

125969098_1061570180974290_6798563059978286443_n.jpg

 

 

Yes, Paige, one of the larger models. 6-65, 6-72, 6-75, or 8-85. It looks to be a convertible coupe/cabriolet, so maybe the 6-75.

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On 11/12/2020 at 9:11 AM, Walt G said:

8 months ago I started this thread hoping that it would give some of you something to look at and perhaps escape the stress of coping with a terrible health issue that has blanketed the world and brought the demise of so many people. In doing so it would allow us to escape to see the old vehicles we spend so much time with and enjoy the history of plus also  connect  us to life long friendships of fellow enthusiasts. We haven't been able to see a lot of our dear friends this year because of the lack of activities and I know for me that has been very sad indeed. Here are two items to add to the collection that may make some of you stay on the path of hope that one day our lives will return to the happy times of sharing our old used cars!  ( sorry I had to throw that in there!)

the Rolls Royce touring has a body by Connaught and the page is from a October 1929 Franklin Dealer's Bulletin that shows 5 custom body models that were to appear at the custom body salons that took place late in the year for the next years models/series of cars. These started in New York, then moved west to Chicago , San Francisco, and finally Los Angeles. 

Stay well all, hope we meet in person down the road , my sincere best to one and all. And very special thanks to AACA for letting this continue and all of you who have contributed.

Walt

RRCONNAUGHT001.jpg

Franklin6Bpodies001.jpg

I think the Locke Convertible Sedan was built in the 137 chassis. To me, that would be my Holy Grail car. I love the body style and the lines in general.  I can't help wondering if it still exists somewhere. Thanks for posting Walt.

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Eric, when that page was printed in the Dealer's Bulletins in the end of October 1929 the new 1930 series 14 cars were just about being finished up to go in production. Sheet metal for the hood, shell etc was totally different from the 1929 series 13 cars.  Fenders similar in style but not an exact duplicate. I have only ever seen period Franklin material that indicated the Locke bodied conv. sedan was ever on the new series 14 chassis of 1930. I may have a photo of the Locke conv. sedan someplace ( not just artwork) but that may take a while to locate. If I do you will see it here. Locke did some very very fine design and builds of coach work, the Lincoln of that era , model L had the majority of their open body styles ( phaeton, roadster, conv coupes) built by Locke.  I am always happy to share when and what I can, hope to see some things I come up with go into future issues of the Air Cooled News of the Franklin club again after an absence of some years.

Walt

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31 minutes ago, twin6 said:

Another Pierce workhorse.

P-A at Glen Cove  8-6-31.jpg

After their jobs ferrying sightseers up Pikes Peak, because of their reputation as a tough chassis, they were bought by the Rio Grande Sothern Railroad in the southwestern Colorado to covert to railbuses.

Galloping Goose - RGS RR.jpg

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Definitely a full CCCA classic, note the custom accessory grille guard up front or is it a cow catcher guard?  We should look forward to those being reproduced now in stainless steel and see them on numerous cars at future concours. They would be especially useful on tours through bovine country.

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16 minutes ago, alsancle said:

 

 

You waited 24 hours or it took you that long to find your wallet.  I almost bought it to hold it hostage.


 

Unlike some other people, I actually have a job and work. I didn’t have access to my eBay account at home, so I had to wait. As far as holding something hostage.........unless I’m mistaken I have two of your items here your rather attached too.

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1 hour ago, 58L-Y8 said:

After their jobs ferrying sightseers up Pikes Peak, because of their reputation as a tough chassis, they were bought by the Rio Grande Sothern Railroad in the southwestern Colorado to covert to railbuses.

Galloping Goose - RGS RR.jpg


 

The Pikes Peak photo is common, there was a fleet of twenty five Pierce Arrow’s from the Broadmore Hotel that hauled sightseers of the mountain road. Tens of thousands of photos were taken at the top of the hill, with a chalk board usually giving the date on the running board. Many, many cars from their fleet still survive, and are still being found. They would stamp their own car number on the frame horn to identify it in house. I had one of their cars in my garage for five years.

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All years, all series, up till 1931 for open cars, closed cars after that. Open cars remained till after the war. They were built with special gearing in the rear ended and transmission for climbing. 

Edited by edinmass (see edit history)
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5 hours ago, Walt G said:

That P-A on Pike's Peak - say is that Ed in the back seat on the right side next to the Boopsie sisters of Boston? ( ya know Trixie Boopsie and Betty Boopsie)


Yup, that’s me in a seersucker suit..........except I would prefer a Series 36 with a one off body by LeBaron. Notice the date, car is a 1925 model, and it’s taken in 1931.

Edited by edinmass (see edit history)
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42 minutes ago, edinmass said:

Notice the date, car is a 1925 model, and it’s taken in 1931.

I'll question the 1925 year model, Ed, because it lacks 4-wheel brakes which became standard in mid-1924.

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I had my glasses on George. But the damn phone is so small I couldn’t tell. The size of the doors made me think it was a small car. If there’s no front brakes it must be a series 33.

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2 hours ago, edinmass said:

I had my glasses on George. But the damn phone is so small I couldn’t tell. The size of the doors made me think it was a small car. If there’s no front brakes it must be a series 33.

I was looking on the big screen.  The 40% coverage of louvers on the hood side panel says Series 33, plus I'm pretty sure they didn't use S80s.  Incidentally, S33 and S80 brake components are identical, which is why S80s stop so well.  Pierce also made retrofit kits to convert 2-wheel-brake S33s to 4-wheel brakes, so I have trouble understanding why this car hadn't been converted by 1931.  Going down the hill with a full load and 2-wheel brakes must have been exciting!

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Great photos Ed. This is just a guess but I think the vessel is the USS Mayflower, the Presidential yacht. The date is 1917.

 

IMG_1914.thumb.jpg.1aee68f54f4312d02bb9593bd53bd491.jpg

 

It seems to have something to do with the visit of these two French officers, I presume War Heroes because both have the Croix de Guerre and the one on the right also has been decorated with the Legion of Honor.  Neither are senior officers and they could be aviators. In WWI the French aviation service did not have a specific uniform. Members wore the uniform of the branch of service they came from and these were frequently somewhat different. As the war progressed, and men joined from civilian life, they had no "old uniform" to wear and, because there was no official uniform, they could wear whatever uniform they liked best.

 

IMG_1913.thumb.jpg.8e8a4cf685259e91808d6bd501ffef41.jpg

 

This even will be recorded somewhere and some further digging will probably reveal who they were. Everyone in the background is in US uniform, including the drivers so we can be pretty sure they are in the US. One of the cars has a little two-flag device on the radiator cap with French and US flags.

Edited by JV Puleo (see edit history)
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