Jump to content

Period images to relieve some of the stress


Recommended Posts

15 minutes ago, edinmass said:

Love the photo with the seat above the trunk! ūüĎćūüĎćūüĎć

That was a custom 1912 Cole 40 built for Princess Victoria, a 'vertically challenged entertainer' of the time.  I believe she was 27" tall, and her butler was 7'1".  All part of her show...as was the car.  Here's another picture of it/her/them.

1912 30-40 Princess Victoria.jpg

Edited by George Cole (see edit history)
  • Like 4
Link to post
Share on other sites
7 minutes ago, George Cole said:

That was a custom 1912 Cole 40 built for Princess Victoria, a 'vertically challenged entertainer' of the time.  I believe she was 27" tall, and her butler was 7'1".  All part of her show...as was the car.  Here's another picture of it/her/them.

1912 30-40 Princess Victoria.jpg

Notice the stairs and handrailing going up the fender for her to get into the coach.  Her butler also put out steps for her to climb up and down from the running board to the ground.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Different posts on this thread have provided a B&W and a colorized photo of actor Gary Cooper with a Duesenberg car.¬† The shade of blue on the Duesenberg is¬†possibly called ‚ÄúRobin‚Äôs Egg Blue‚ÄĚ.¬† Not sure.¬† I remember reading an old report many years ago, a police investigation of a crime in the 1920s, in which it mentioned¬†a "Robin‚Äôs egg blue" car.¬† So that color did exist as a color choice in those days, at least for that particular automobile in the crime report.¬† The make of the car is not definitely remembered at this late date.¬† However, regarding colorization of this Duesenberg, is this shade of blue a factory color?¬† A best guess is that the color in fact is factory rather than¬†after market repaint.

Duesenberg Gary Cooper 01-02.jpg

Duesenberg Gary Cooper 02-02.jpg

  • Like 2
  • Thanks 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
6 hours ago, LCK81403 said:

Different posts on this thread have provided a B&W and a colorized photo of actor Gary Cooper with a Duesenberg car.¬† The shade of blue on the Duesenberg is¬†possibly called ‚ÄúRobin‚Äôs Egg Blue‚ÄĚ.¬† Not sure.¬† I remember reading an old report many years ago, a police investigation of a crime in the 1920s, in which it mentioned¬†a "Robin‚Äôs egg blue" car.¬† So that color did exist as a color choice in those days, at least for that particular automobile in the crime report.¬† The make of the car is not definitely remembered at this late date.¬† However, regarding colorization of this Duesenberg, is this shade of blue a factory color?¬† A best guess is that the color in fact is factory rather than¬†after market repaint.

Duesenberg Gary Cooper 01-02.jpg

Duesenberg Gary Cooper 02-02.jpg

The car is absolutely fabulous in that color.  Alas, someone at Duesenberg liked yellow over green.

duesenberg-sm-file-Alan-Hudson.jpg

Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, ericmac said:

The car is absolutely fabulous in that color.  Alas, someone at Duesenberg liked yellow over green.

duesenberg-sm-file-Alan-Hudson.jpg


ericmac............having seen and played around with this actual car......I can confirm the colors are authentic and terrible. ūü§ģ

  • Haha 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

This one was on the MTFCA (model T) forum this morning. I thought some people here would really enjoy it. Thanks go to Tom Rootlieb.

 

I am not sure, and when I zoomed in, couldn't quite make out the script on the radiator, but I think this may be an EMF/Studebaker. The script looks like it may be Studebaker. For awhile in around 1911 through '12, cars were sold badged either way. Studebaker had experimented with automobiles for awhile in partnership with others to see where they wanted to go in the automobile business. For 1913, they dropped the EMF name and became simply Studebaker.

 

58B5CD2F-EDA6-449F-8FEC-C56970F0ECBD.jpeg

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites
9 hours ago, edinmass said:


ericmac............having seen and played around with this actual car......I can confirm the colors are authentic and terrible. ūü§ģ

J-111, a Lebaron Phaeton was a demonstrator car used by the Los Angeles dealership. Eventually Irving Gilmore bought the car and it has become the crown jewel of the Gilmore Car Museum's permanent collection.  In 1984 an exhaustive restoration was started and at the time a fateful decision was made,  not to restore the car using authentic colors, a color scheme that nearly matched the Cooper car. I think Gilmore made the correct decision. 

20160306_130831.jpg

  • Like 4
  • Thanks 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, ericmac said:

J-111, a Lebaron Phaeton was a demonstrator car used by the Los Angeles dealership. Eventually Irving Gilmore bought the car and it has become the crown jewel of the Gilmore Car Museum's permanent collection.  In 1984 an exhaustive restoration was started and at the time a fateful decision was made,  not to restore the car using authentic colors, a color scheme that nearly matched the Cooper car. I think Gilmore made the correct decision. 

20160306_130831.jpg

 

 

J-111 used colors based off of another identical car.....and I think they were correct to make the change. I also like the fact they didn't muck up the lines with too many bolt on accessories. The car is simply beautiful the way it sits. 

  • Like 3
Link to post
Share on other sites

Ed, I totally agree with your comment about how they did not "muck up the lines with to many bolt on accessories".  I would guess 35 or so years ago the trend was to paint a any car - bright colors, chrome everything that could be removed, and add every possible light, do dad, giz mo, and wind up toy that could be bolted to the car. Yes, when new that could have been done to the car by the original purchaser - BUT was seldom if ever done and if done was usually on the left coast in the Hollywood/L.A. area where attention was sought by the movie studios or movie stars ( that's what they were called then not 'celebrities') .  The car companies and designers for same wanted a "perfect" product to offer to the public as is and yes they did indeed have accessory catalogs from the factory but those were not often consulted by a customer. Most popular accessories seem to be trunks, an additional spare tire and cover for same, and on open body styles wind wings for the windshields. ( if a touring car or phaeton perhaps a tonneau windshield).  Maybe even a license plate frame.  Fog and Trippe, pilot ray lights are on more cars now of the era then they were when new.

I have many accessory catalogs of the pre war era in my archives, both factory and "after market" the top end accessory company for vehicles was Nil Melior ( translates to none finer) in New York City who were in business approximately a decade from 1929 to 1939. At one time they had a store in the lobby of the Waldorf-Astoria Hotel ! Yes, a car parts store in one of the finest hotels in N.Y. City.¬† I always wanted to go there and announce at a clear and robust voice that it was a great location for a auto parts store. ūü§£¬† I know there are a few of you reading this thinking ' yeah Walt would do that too'.

WG

  • Like 7
  • Thanks 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, edinmass said:

 

 

J-111 used colors based off of another identical car.....and I think they were correct to make the change. I also like the fact they didn't muck up the lines with too many bolt on accessories. The car is simply beautiful the way it sits. 

My favorite car ever. Was there in 1987 as it was unveiled in those colors at the first CCCA experience.   I was 11.  Made a huge impression on me.  

 

Edited by Cadillac Fan (see edit history)
Link to post
Share on other sites
8 hours ago, ericmac said:

J-111, a Lebaron Phaeton was a demonstrator car used by the Los Angeles dealership. Eventually Irving Gilmore bought the car and it has become the crown jewel of the Gilmore Car Museum's permanent collection.  In 1984 an exhaustive restoration was started and at the time a fateful decision was made,  not to restore the car using authentic colors, a color scheme that nearly matched the Cooper car. I think Gilmore made the correct decision. 

20160306_130831.jpg

FYI , while I believe that Irving S Gilmore did have a car collection, it was Donald Gilmore,a brother , that started the Gilmore Car Museum.  

Edited by Cadillac Fan (see edit history)
  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

6E4B7583-5079-4E71-B56D-55EA732AD670.jpeg                                                                                                        This one reminds me of the summer of 1970 in Birds Hill Park in Winnipeg.  We had a picnic and when we returned to the car I had a flat.  Here I am changing the tire being overseen by three nieces while my brother-in-law inspected the radiator cap.

Birds Hill Park flat tire.jpg

Edited by Tinindian (see edit history)
  • Like 3
Link to post
Share on other sites

I have viewed every photo in this thread though I have not had anything to contribute, until now.  My friend restored a 1923 Gray Dort and he had an original photograph of the same make and model taken near the Gray Dort factory in Chatham, On.  This afternoon we drove the car about 40 miles for the first trip to the location where the original photo was taken nearly a hundred years ago.

 

Regards, Gary

 

DSC_4028 (2).JPG

DSC_4037 (2).JPG

  • Like 16
  • Thanks 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Gary, that is just so really neat that you were able to create the same photo in the same place with the same car. So happy the car survived AND the building as well. WOW

Thank you for sharing this with us!

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
8 hours ago, Cadillac Fan said:

FYI , while I believe that Irving S Gilmore did have a car collection, it was Donald Gilmore,a brother , that started the Gilmore Car Museum.  

Yes, yes it was Donald Gilmore not Irving who founded the Gilmore Car Museum. Duh! Sleeplessness will do that to a guy. I should know as I used to be an advisory board member at GCM. I too was there at GCM for the first CCCA Experience featuring Duesenberg in 1987. That was a fabulous show.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

My father, Frederick Spong age 23, riding his 1938 Coventry Eagle motor cycle on patrol while serving with the Home Guard in the summer of 1940 when an invasion by Nazi Germany was expected to take place at any time. Fortunately this never happened but it was a very real threat. 

Family Photos60217.jpg

  • Like 3
Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
×
×
  • Create New...