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Period images to relieve some of the stress


Walt G

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The great thing here is there is almost never any bad intent........when I posted off topic, I didn't realize what thread I was posting in, somehow the main screen was in another format, which I only figured out after Walt's comments. It was set up with all the junk on the right, and comments on the left. Another instance of upgrades to the site that I never knew were done....until I accidently hit the different format button.

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OK my friends all is good! Today I am sharing a few obscurities and will give you a day to decide what they are - one hint - they are all European.

Give us your thoughts . I know a few of you are most likely thinking - where does he find this stuff? I have been collecting over half a century, had friends who were knowledgeable looking for me in Europe as well as the USA for decades.  In England when I visited there I had access to collections that made me aware that some cars and coach builders even existed. I REALLY ENJOY sharing what I have managed to acquire , thanks to AACA I can.

Walt

KellnerMINERVA001.jpg

FrazerNashLeMansreplica003.jpg

OPEL193parissalon001.jpg

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The last of the three is a 1937-'39 Opel Admiral four door cabriolet, this body style a factory standard offering, although its styling suggest a coachbuilder designer input.  The reason these stick in mind is the similarity to the 1938-'39 Hupmobile E & H series with the headlights integrated into the hood-sides.  Wonder who copied who?

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Ok identity time for the three period photos I posted: Steve has it correct about the conv. sedan that it is an Opel Admiral , the race car at the automobile show is a Frazer Nash LeMans type,  and the first one is a Minerva ( yes the shell over the radiator is not what one is used to seeing) with a body by Alexis Kellner Carrossier of Berlin , Germany. This photo is in a hard bound soft felt covered presentation catalog that was in a dealership or at Kellner's factory. that same type shell is also pictured on several other Minervas in that book , all on Minerva chassis and a penciled in date says the year is 1913.

So many photographs/images never before seen and so little time.  It is just incredible what was designed and built and most of us have never seen. Not just in the coach builders promotional material to entice people to want to buy their efforts/product but magazines most people here in the USA are not familiar with like OMNIA , a periodical in France that was monthly , with many pages, issued from 1920 thru 1936 ( I have nearly a full run except for about 4 issues for 1936) . La Carroserie magazine, auto show issues of L'Illustration magazine  - and they had a great representation of custom coachwork on chassis of American manufacture.

Walt

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30 minutes ago, Walt G said:

...", the race car at the automobile show is a Frazer Nash LeMans type,  and the first one is a Minerva ( yes the shell over the radiator is not what one is used to seeing) with a body by Alexis Kellner Carrossier of Berlin , Germany. This photo is in a hard bound soft felt covered presentation catalog that was in a dealership or at Kellner's factory. that same type shell is also pictured on several other Minervas in that book , all on Minerva chassis and a penciled in date says the year is 1913.

Walt:

1) What would be the year range of the Frazer-Nash LeMans type?

2) Was that deep-V'ed radiator shell typical of what Minerva used before the style with which we're generally familiar?

 

A comment on the Opel Admiral styling:  Certainly Harley Earl had influence on Opel styling in general being a GM operation then.  But, its interesting the headlights faired into the hood-sides were closely identified with the Hupmobile Aerodynamic, yet no American GM displayed that feature.  

Steve 

 

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Steve

The photo of the Frazer-Nash is dated 1950 on the back in pencil.

the Minerva radiator shell we are all familiar with ( I think was one of the most attractively styled in the car industry) was what was being used when that car was bodied by Kellner. In the sales book/album both are shown ! some with the "normal" styling we are used to seeing and some with that pointed look. It is the only time I have ever seen that pointed look so I am wondering if the coach body builder Kellner decided that's what they wanted ?

Walt

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Walt:

I'd surmised the Frazer-Nash might have been around 1950 by the Bristol 401 displayed in the background.  This Curbside Classic article quite affectively details their history:

https://www.curbsideclassic.com/automotive-histories/automotive-history-british-deadly-sins-high-brow-hybrids-part-2-bristol-603-britannia-blenheim-arrested-development/

 

Of the Minerva, perhaps the elegantly-styled 'normal' radiator shell wasn't considered prestigious enough for some customers who demanded the deeply-V'ed pointed style that mimicked the look of another higher prestige maker of the times.  I'm thinking of those Uppercu Cadillac buyer who had the "Rolls-Royce-styled" radiator shell to give their cars a greater touch of 'class'.   

 

Steve 

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15 minutes ago, edinmass said:

Love the photo with the seat above the trunk! 👍👍👍

That was a custom 1912 Cole 40 built for Princess Victoria, a 'vertically challenged entertainer' of the time.  I believe she was 27" tall, and her butler was 7'1".  All part of her show...as was the car.  Here's another picture of it/her/them.

1912 30-40 Princess Victoria.jpg

Edited by George Cole (see edit history)
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7 minutes ago, George Cole said:

That was a custom 1912 Cole 40 built for Princess Victoria, a 'vertically challenged entertainer' of the time.  I believe she was 27" tall, and her butler was 7'1".  All part of her show...as was the car.  Here's another picture of it/her/them.

1912 30-40 Princess Victoria.jpg

Notice the stairs and handrailing going up the fender for her to get into the coach.  Her butler also put out steps for her to climb up and down from the running board to the ground.

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