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Period images to relieve some of the stress


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On 9/15/2020 at 7:09 PM, edinmass said:

Two Springfield Mass cars.......very special. First needs no explanation, the second is a Knox Waterless, AKA “Old Porcupine”

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Second car is a White steamer, a model A or B, built in Cleveland (but maybe it was in Springfield when the photo was taken).

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20 minutes ago, twin6 said:

Second car is a White steamer, a model A or B, built in Cleveland (but maybe it was in Springfield when the photo was taken).


Cant argue with that.......I have no clue, even though I’m a Knox club member for twenty years. 👍

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8 hours ago, twin6 said:

Second car is a White steamer, a model A or B, built in Cleveland (but maybe it was in Springfield when the photo was taken).

 

 

 

Cover car too, in the Smithsonian, the say it is a 1902. Bob 

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I always found the Case cars interesting. Quality is no where near the White. Two different animals. My other new car is off beat, strange, obscure, and out of the norm.......way out. It’s not fair to ask anyone to guess. And most readers here will find it of no interest to them. AJ and I think it’s neat.......no one else will appreciate it like he and I do. The photos are from an archive, it’s diverse and not well known. Most of the photos have not been posted that I am aware of. I figure it keeps the early car guys entertained.....and an occasional “what is it” like the Chadwick is fun........and I am shocked it was identified so fast. 👍

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On 9/23/2020 at 11:00 AM, John_Mereness said:

Sidenote: This is not a RR - it is a Roamer or something like that. 

I was going to say that but you beat me to it. In addition to Roamer, Kenworthy also used a very RR like radiator shape.

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27 minutes ago, edinmass said:

Yes....1908

It's actually a long time favorite of mine, to the extent of finding the period articles about it in Motor and Horseless Age. I even entertained the fantasy of replicating the 4-cylinder engine and spent some time trying to think of a way to make the copper water jackets. I like the design of the engine and the use of separate water jackets brings it just into the realm of possibility. But, I won't live long enough to do all the things I've thought of.

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2 hours ago, edinmass said:

I always found the Case cars interesting. Quality is no where near the White. Two different animals. My other new car is off beat, strange, obscure, and out of the norm.......way out. It’s not fair to ask anyone to guess. And most readers here will find it of no interest to them. AJ and I think it’s neat.......no one else will appreciate it like he and I do. The photos are from an archive, it’s diverse and not well known. Most of the photos have not been posted that I am aware of. I figure it keeps the early car guys entertained.....and an occasional “what is it” like the Chadwick is fun........and I am shocked it was identified so fast. 👍

I didn't research it but the forward mounted radiator and two straps made me think Chadwick. Just lucky that I was on the right track.

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John, the Cunningham photo that you posted shows a slightly V-shaped windshield.  Do you know what year this car is?  In Clymer's Scrapbook Number 5, page 186 a similar Cunningham is shown that supposedly is a 1931 model with a flat windshield.  The Clymer Cunningham also has drum headlights that appears to have painted bodies with chrome or nickel rings around the the bodies.

 

What is a driver to do on a rainy day, as in the photo?  Was there a retractable roof for the front compartment?  I think Packard had such a retractable roof.  ?

Cunningham 002.jpg

31 Cunningham Clymer Scrapbook Nr5 p186.JPG

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16 minutes ago, LCK81403 said:

 

31 Cunningham Clymer Scrapbook Nr5 p186.JPG

I am guessing that this is the Cunningham Panel Brougham that showed up for sale via an auction and then later by owner on Facebook and AACA site late last year - it is silver body and black fenders now - unfortunately had an unrealistic owner that wanted to be rewarded for neglect and amateur work. 

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18 hours ago, edinmass said:

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This is a 1913 Lozier Model 77 touring.  I have the identical Lozier.  Why do I know it is a 1913?  The 1913 has flat topped fenders.  In 1914 the Model 77s had rounded top fenders.  Thanks for posting this photo.

Do you have any other Lozier photos to post?

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20 minutes ago, LCK81403 said:

John, the Cunningham photo that you posted shows a slightly V-shaped windshield.  Do you know what year this car is?  In Clymer's Scrapbook Number 5, page 186 a similar Cunningham is shown that supposedly is a 1931 model with a flat windshield.  The Clymer Cunningham also has drum headlights that appears to have painted bodies with chrome or nickel rings around the the bodies.

 

What is a driver to do on a rainy day, as in the photo?  Was there a retractable roof for the front compartment?  I think Packard had such a retractable roof.  ?

Cunningham 002.jpg

 

As to roof = The horizontal panel on the face of the rear roof opens and there is a leather or oil cloth cover that pulls out with a header bar on it that attaches to the windshield.  There are also side arms for over the doors, but interestingly these rarely fit in any storage area in the car (at least with rare exception any town car I have seen).  

 

Rolls Royce started playing with sliding metal roofs, but did not do so until middle 1930's 

 

I am aware of a 1930 Packard 745 Town Car with Lebaron body that had both a leather cover (also in storage in header) and also has a full metal roof that fits over the front compartment (but some bad stuff happened and hopefully the metal roof stayed with the car post death of prior owner).  This Packard has recently been for sale - it really is a bargain at the asking price too. 

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1 hour ago, edinmass said:

Bob......you would need to ask a Fleetwood employee........and my best guess is he will be hard to get on the phone!

 

 

Safe bet he doesn't have a cell phone either. 

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6 hours ago, 1937hd45 said:

Really would like to know the reason for the odd tapered hinge on the hood. Bob 

 

My "guess" would be that the hinge would be placed at a slope so that the lower panel pulls forward as the hood is raised. This so that the bottom rear corner of the hood pulls forward as it is raised and doesn't try to gouge its way into the exposed firewall. Then when lowering the hood, the rear corner will begin about an inch away from the firewall, and smoothly swing back to nest neatly in its proper corner.  Eliminating a very common problem with straight hoods and exposed firewalls in those years.

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39 minutes ago, wayne sheldon said:

 

My "guess" would be that the hinge would be placed at a slope so that the lower panel pulls forward as the hood is raised. This so that the bottom rear corner of the hood pulls forward as it is raised and doesn't try to gouge its way into the exposed firewall. Then when lowering the hood, the rear corner will begin about an inch away from the firewall, and smoothly swing back to nest neatly in its proper corner.  Eliminating a very common problem with straight hoods and exposed firewalls in those years.

 

Perhaps it was hinged to avoid hittng the cowl lamp which is missing and probably off to be repaired.!😀

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Just now, A. Ballard 35R said:

 

Perhaps it was hinged to avoid hittng the cowl lamp which is missing and probably off to be repaired.!😀

I was thinking that, too.

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1 hour ago, A. Ballard 35R said:

 

Perhaps it was hinged to avoid hittng the cowl lamp which is missing and probably off to be repaired.!😀

Brakes must need adjustment, headlamps are off for repair as well. Bob 

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