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Period images to relieve some of the stress


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Edinmass, back on what is now page 2 of this compressed thread, you posted a photo without comment, without identification.  Several type identifications have been associated with the vehicle.  One is Mercedes-Benz W31 G34, a second designation a 1939 Mercedes-Benz G34.  Is there a more definite identification or vehicle designation for this historical vehicle?

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Mercedes-Benz W31 G34.jpg

Mercedes-Benz 006.jpg

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2 hours ago, Cole motor car lover said:

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here is another Cole. It’s a sport sedan with a custom body by willoughby.

Great Photo what was your source? I have that same photo that I got with all the original Willoughby material from their family files and believe recently I shared it with someone.

Walt

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12 hours ago, LCK81403 said:

Edinmass, back on what is now page 2 of this compressed thread, you posted a photo without comment, without identification.  Several type identifications have been associated with the vehicle.  One is Mercedes-Benz W31 G34, a second designation a 1939 Mercedes-Benz G34.  Is there a more definite identification or vehicle designation for this historical vehicle?

6EE90FA5-488C-415D-9AC9-770BEC1D1946.thumb.png.7759caa28601e00895b17f6fad9a5cbc.png

Mercedes-Benz W31 G34.jpg

Mercedes-Benz 006.jpg

 

Nothing I have.............many of the photographic libraries don't have any ID's associated with their photos. 

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Marmon named this style "Longchamps".  This Weymann body style was also called the "St. Cloud" on the Duesenberg J chassis.  Note the fabric also covers the hood and its sides, which was Weymann's practice before they added the metal paneled option. 

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Courtesy of The Old Motor....

 

 

We are looking at what may be the only good images that have survived of John E. Meyer’s attractive and unique J.E.M. “Special” “Camping Phaeton.” Meyer, whose address is on the back of these photos, apparently lived or worked at 42 West 39th St in Midtown Manhattan in New York City.

The “Standard Catalog of American Cars” lists the J.E.M. Model “A” without a photo as being “built in 1922” and included in the 1923 “Automobile Reference Manual.” That publication lists it as having a “128 w.b.” chassis powered by a “six-cylinder Continental model 7R engine” and was a “two/four passenger” car with a selling price of “$2500.”

After a brief search for other photos, a patent, or additional information about this vehicle, nothing more was found. However, a 1902 patent was uncovered granted to a John E. Meyer of NYC for a wine cooler.

We assume this was a one-of-one Meyer might have had built to his specifications and then tried to patent its features with hopes cashing in on his ideas and producing and selling more of these “Camping Phaetons.” With the “Good Roads Movement”going on simultaneously as this car was constructed, auto camping and touring was a very popular activity at the time.

 

 

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