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Period images to relieve some of the stress


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There seems to be a misunderstanding by many.

 

NO POSTS ARE MISSING!

 

The page count of posts went from 25 to 40, so the total number of pages has reduced. NOT the number of posts.

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7 hours ago, Peter Gariepy said:

There seems to be a misunderstanding by many.

 

NO POSTS ARE MISSING!

 

The page count of posts when from 25 to 40, so the total number of pages has reduced. NOT the number of posts.

The word is "went"!

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Here is an image from a print in the Willoughby Body Co. archives that is from 1912. I was able 35+ years ago to purchase a huge amount of the Willoughby archives/files of period photographs, images etc which included Francis WIlloughby's photo albums inscribed in ink in his own hand. All found at an antique show about 15 miles south of Utica, NY and purchased from a vendor who found it all at a garage sale in Utica!  Apparently the material was saved when the Willoughby Company factory was cleaned out and rescued before it hit the trash.

A huge amount of period material ( they also built commercial bodies for local transportation and hospital use) . I hope to do a history of Willoughby sometime next year. This stuff has sat here in my library/archives to long, the story needs to be told.

WG

WILLOUGHBYsedanearly001.jpg

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Walt, how much paper work would go into the design of that Willoughby or any other custom body? Did the wood framework builders and panel makers work side by side or was the wood finished then handed off the the panel people? Bob 

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Hi Bob, As far as what was paperwork - layout for wood framework , some but less then you would expect. Most of the guys designing the structural framework had been doing so for years from the horse drawn carriage days.  I know the woodwork was finished and then the body which usually was on a rolling platform was then moved over to the panel beaters for them to complete the metal skin to cover the structural framework. I have images in periodicals of that era ( both USA and European) showing this some what, but the Willoughby 8 x 10 photos I have show it happening - the stages of the wood construction, etc. seat hardware was done before the skin was applied often, just for ease of access.

Budd CO. in Phildelphia in the early/mid 1920s was already into all steel construction for bodies, and even did some for Citroen chassis that were imported and then on a lease agreement that construction was started by Citroen in France. I have photos of all of this.

I hope to be able to at some point give a talk at an AACA annual meeting to share all of this in person and answer questions if I can. I have already given at least two talks on the subject at CCCA annual meetings when I used to belong to that club and also provided images for a CCCA member/director to give one at a concours that I didn't attend.  A custom body would take anywhere from 3 to 6 months to complete as castings had to be made from patterns ( which also had to be made)  for things like cowl/windshield supports etc all hidden under the sheet metal, seat springs had to be measured and ordered from Atkinson Spring in Hamburg, NY . I will stop here as I am guessing this is getting to be like reading a text book for a lot of the people on the forums. Don't want to put everyone to sleep.

Walt

Edited by Walt G
clarifcation (see edit history)
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Returning to some old business, as far as I know, the "hulk" is still lurking in the unidentified category on this forum thread.  The "hulk" is apparently a commercial vehicle that carries a large tank over the rear wheels that probably would contain a liquid.  The manufacturer of the vehicle appears to be Jeffery.  The image from the forum was magnified on my computer and it held together enough to allow the name Jeffery to be read.  In my photo files are several photos of Jeffery automobiles that have the same Jeffery logo on their radiators.

 

The rear wheels on the Jeffery are remarkable, reminding one of the "20 Mule Team Borax" wagons.  There appears to be pipes and a spray bar under the overhead storage tank.  The spray bar appears to have spray nozzles approximately 8 or 10 inches apart, suggesting this vehicle may have been used to spray oil or possibly hot tar to pave a road surface.

 

106508581_10158829104367189_5819158182583783117_n - Copy.jpg

DSC00326.JPG

16 Jeffery 02-07.jpg

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Jeffery was the precursor of Nash, and Nash was famous for not only cars, but incredible trucks. The Nash Quads of the Great War (WW1) were legendary. I recall reading many years ago that trucks were also built by Jeffery before Nash took over.

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6 hours ago, Walt G said:

Don't want to put everyone to sleep.

 

Walt, you'll never put me to sleep. This is very interesting. Most people at car shows are impressed with the beauty and elegance of the Classics (capital C), but few really understand what "custom built" really meant in those days.  Thanks for saving the material and please see that it is preserved when you no longer need it.

 

Don 

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My contribution for the weekend. Images from the Automobile Salon souvenir catalogue ( that's the way they spelled it) for Chicago 1922. Same image appeared in the New York Salon catalogue.

All or most of the material I have will eventually ( hopefully a long time from now!) be placed with a library that will have reasonable access staffed by people who are knowledgeable at what they are viewing. I thought I had that all sorted out for many years but was convinced otherwise in short order by the club President nearly 3 years ago. Oh Well.

MURPHYbody1922001.jpg

Edited by Walt G
typo (see edit history)
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BODY QUALITY - There is another topic on this same title under General Discussion, but I just came across this Willys-Knight Taxi sales folder and it is pretty explicit as to what was on offer and the image shows the "body quality" . They didn't have to deal with welds, but perhaps termites??

WIllysKnightaxi bodywood specs.jpg

WIllysKnightaxi bodywood 001.jpg

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Who would have thought an early Leland-built Lincoln could look so sporty!   Only a set of wire wheels would have added to the affect.   Their masterful design ethic is displayed early in this Lincoln: close-coupled proportions, V-windshield, tonneau cowl, step-plates, dual rear-mounted spares.  Though, the miss-matched tires and wood-spokes were an odd choice for a promotion photo.

Automobile Salon souvenir catalogue - Chicago 1922.jpg

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Steve

the car looks great due to the Murphy application of their design and coachwork, they even made the fenders, only thing visible that is Lincoln is the hood , headlamps wheels and radiator shell.

Walt

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Walt.

Small wonder then it looks so great, the Murphy magic touch!  Henry Leland was the "master of precision" but definitely not attractive body design...

Steve 

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oldcarfudd natiled it.  It's an air-cooled Holmes.  Circa '21 or '23.  It has a unique body mold that runs straight from the simulated radiator to the rear of the car body.

 

Walt, I really like the Willy-Knight wood framing.  It is nice to see what is underneath the skin.  It is amazing that wood skeleton bodies were turned out so quickly.  The curved wood looks like it probably was steam bent which is costly of energy resources and time consuming to complete.

HOLMEScar001.thumb.jpg.2fef5244be713871fd73d059190948d1.jpg

21 Holmes 4Dr Sedan.jpg

23 Holmes Series 4 Clymer Scrapbook Nr8 p178.JPG

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Walt, Thank you for keeping this thread on track. If the club was still together, and we had used of Veterans Park Field, today would have been the 59th Ridgefield Meet. So many great cars & people. The memories were life changing. Bob 

DSCF0182.JPG

DSCF0183.JPG

DSCF0185.JPG

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