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Period images to relieve some of the stress


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On 8/28/2020 at 9:24 AM, Colin Spong said:

An elegant couple, formerly dressed in top hat and tails. leave the theatre while their chauffeur driven 1927 Model T Tudor awaits them.

We know that Ford was "The Universal Car" but is this taking things a little too far? From the British edition of the Ford Times. January 1927.

Ford T 001 (2).jpg

Having driven a few of these...yes. yes it is!

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9 hours ago, John_Mereness said:

Two great photos from Allen Buchholz

image001.thumb.jpg.d13b2d39dc2ca87b10e6665a10be8318.jpg.6a48a6c14d1f490c8ea0f45ed58dcbf5.jpg

 

On the left appears to be about a 1913 Oakland. There are a few differences from the 1913 model in this 1962 photo. Most noticeably the sidelights in the original photo are farther out than on the 1913, and the steering wheels are on different sides. Would the left hand steering mean the original car is a later model than 1913?

 

 

534616443_Oakland1913RoddyHuff.thumb.jpg.72e2f4aa307b2c406050842a5bab92af.jpg
 

Don

 

 

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Really interesting to see classic cars represented by the various dealerships all over the world. Gives all of us a great historical perspective as to the extent that they were on offer and the effort it took to get a car someplace so far away from where they were manufactured. All transportation by boat , not air freight.  "hypermodern" gotta love that! THANK YOU all for your contributions GREAT STUFF. How many of us are seeing and reading things we never knew existed before? 

Keep in mind that this is because AACA is providing the space and service for automotive history to members and non members alike. Join AACA!

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Auto Show Overload........don’t ask, just enjoy........

 

Your gonna be busy looking at all the details.....😀

51241C78-28D9-4703-B6A7-62D48CB3DB49.png

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On 8/31/2020 at 1:22 PM, DLynskey said:

 

On the left appears to be about a 1913 Oakland. There are a few differences from the 1913 model in this 1962 photo. Most noticeably the sidelights in the original photo are farther out than on the 1913, and the steering wheels are on different sides. Would the left hand steering mean the original car is a later model than 1913?

 

 

534616443_Oakland1913RoddyHuff.thumb.jpg.72e2f4aa307b2c406050842a5bab92af.jpg
 

Don

 

 

 

The car in the old photo is a 1914 Oakland.

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10 hours ago, edinmass said:

This is a very special car......Walt......comments? List all the special things you see.

DD318837-3144-45AD-8BE7-060DEBDF81B7.png

What I do find 'special' or somewhat interesting are the free-standing B-pillars supporting the rear-hinged front doors.  Most tourings and phaetons of the era, and right up until the second world war had a solid front seatback which connected to the left and right pillars, and added support.  The self-supporting B-pillar became commonplace starting in 1955 when four door hardtops became mainstream in the marketplace.

 

Craig

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Some quick observations as I am on my way out - this " California top" ( Franklin called it a demi sedan) had a permanent fixed top but to get a touring car like affect could be opened up by letting the window frames in the doors above the belt line  drop down on hinges ( Franklin demi sedan were totally removable) . Appears that the windows which would have been wood frames and lowered into the doors on this body were regulated by wide straps at the center of the door that could be stopped at a certain level to keep them part or fully open or closed.

Seats, door and rear quarter upholstery are all covered in seat covers. This was popular to keep dirt off the seats ( even if the seats were leather) as road conditions in the era before and just after WWI were all over the place quality wise - most paved roads were in larger cities. The interior and seat covers were offered by many manufacturers in that era in automotive magazines . The split front seats would allow rear seat passengers to get into the front seats by navigating ( ie climbing through) the open area between the front seats. That idea/feature did not last long as it was an awkward thing to accomplish . Robe rails mounted to the rear doors rather then the back of the front seats due to accommodating the jump seats.

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A trio of National race cars built in Des Moines, Iowa in 1932 ( later versions of same were more streamlined) they used a Briggs & Stratton 1 cyl. type Y motor .
At the time they were used as a attraction in department stores as a give-a -way to bring customers in to buy stuff at the height of the depression. Also were used at State fairs where kids could take one out for a ride at 10 cents or 25 cents ,  with a local kid hired to run along side to keep the kid behind the wheel from straying off course (!!) Photo is from the family ( I got in 1995) of the fellow who designed and built the racers. In 1995 research vaguely showed that there were 20 built total. All steel body .  I have one of these in my collection that I have been intending to restore since I bought it from Jim Cox ( Bev Kimes husband) who found it in a shed in NJ someplace 25 years ago. Wonder if I will ever get around to doing that? Hummm...............

An advertisement at the time they were new said that it had a 4 cycle gasoline motor ( 60 miles to the gallon) and a top speed of 8 mph. Built by National Sales & Mfg. CO, of Des Moines, Iowa.

 

NATIONALracecar004.jpg

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9 hours ago, Walt G said:

Seats, door and rear quarter upholstery are all covered in seat covers. This was popular to keep dirt off the seats ( even if the seats were leather) as road conditions in the era before and just after WWI were all over the place quality wise - most paved roads were in larger cities. The interior and seat covers were offered by many manufacturers in that era in automotive magazines .

 

 

The 1927 Paige sedan I have (my dad bought it in 1967, took it apart, and never did anymore with it) still has factory installed seat covers on the bottom cushions both front and rear. The upholstery is in poor condition as the car sat outside a barn for twenty years before he bought it. He got it just in time to save it, the top had just weathered through (ruining what was likely a still nice interior only a few years before), however the wood framework had not suffered any significant damage. The body is one of the most solid original wood framed sedans I have ever seen!

I have an original dealer parts listing, as well as an original salesman's pocket size reference book for the car. They mention the seat covers.

 

7 hours ago, Walt G said:

  I have one of these in my collection that I have been intending to restore since I bought it from Jim Cox ( Bev Kimes husband) who found it in a shed in NJ someplace 25 years ago. Wonder if I will ever get around to doing that? Hummm...............

 

The Paige is my "I hope to get it restored" someday car.

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Roll of rope was used to act as a barrier/fence  when attached to posts/stakes in the ground to keep the spectators back as well as the kids who paid their 10 cents to drive the cars around in a certain area. As mentioned this was done at local fairs and most of it done in fields or on lawns.

WG

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  • gwells changed the title to Period images to relieve some of the stress

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