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Agree Sagamore Hill is a wonderful look back in time. It's sad that the pre war car show is no longer, what with so many unique early cars on Long Island. Not many early cars coming out to shows. I've seen far more in this thread than all the shows in the past 40 years. 

 

Thanks again for starting it, Walt. 

 

Paul 

Edited by PFitz (see edit history)
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17 hours ago, PFitz said:

Agree Sagamore Hill is a wonderful look back in time. It's sad that the pre war car show is no longer, what with so many unique early cars on Long Island. Not many early cars coming out to shows. I've seen far more in this thread than all the shows in the past 40 years. 

 

Thanks again for starting it, Walt. 

 

Paul 

Paul, it is my pleasure to get this thread started and focus on the pre WWII era cars.  There are many AACA and other club members who have not had an experience with a 80+ year old car/vehicle. Not even to sit on a running board nor a ride around the block in one. It is something everyone should have the pleasure of doing.  These early photographs I hope draw you back to an era when they were new and automotive technology was  not available at the press of a button. I hope it has brought more of an appreciation of what "was then" that was developed by the use of a pencil, eraser, and a slide rule to calculate figures!  Plus the styling that was just so creative and again not decided upon by a machine but a creative mind. IT IS ALL FUN, makes us happy to see other people who are squirrels like us supporting this particular thread. It is also a history lesson as some viewers have mentioned - look at the clothes, hair styles, style of architecture, signs , etc. History frozen in time in b & w.  It is the sharing of memories. Some of us were fortunate enough to be able to talk to the pioneers that were involved in the creation of these cars. My own strong interest in the design and creation of the coachwork saw me in my teens and early 20s not attending sports activities like most people my age but in contact many times in person with people Like Rudy Creteur of Rollston, Tom Hibbard of LeBaron, Enos Derham and the Chief Engineers of the Franklin Company - this information they shared with  me in conversations and the photos etc they shared should not just remain in my archives - it needs to be out there for all of you to enjoy. That is what all of these great period photographs are doing for us. Those of you who can put pen to paper and can write down the memories of that era that you have discovered need to do so, you do not have to be a "seasoned author of repute  " to record history. I am also the local historian for the village I reside in and take great joy in hearing the history told to me by long time residents. It is all good folks.

Walt

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My grandfather on my moms side was the gardener, groundskeeper on an Oyster Bay estate. One day he could hear someone approaching on horseback as he worked near the road. The rider stopped and  admired his work, commented on how nice it looked, it was Teddy Roosevelt out for a morning ride. Bob

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Haven't been posting here so much lately, as I am planning the funeral of a quite close relative.

One of the first persons to be buried at the 1829 inaguarated main cemetary here in Helsinki was Countess Natalia Steinheil, born von Engelhardt.

Walking up the road to the cementary's main entrance I sometimes have imagined  Baron Vladimir Steinheil from Moscow visiting his relatives' tombs in Finland just before WWI, his magnificent 60 hp Gräf-Stift with Armbruster coachwork parked outside  the wall. 

Steinheil (3).jpg

Edited by Casper Friederich (see edit history)
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Original Caption. Havana, Cuba -Havana Plaza, Grand buildings around a formal garden at the piazza in Havana, Cuba. March 1939

The 1937 Lincoln-Zephyr in the foreground  looks as if it has had a hard life, perhaps as a taxi. The rear skirts are missing and the door check strap is broken. 

Cuba 001 (2).jpg

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1 hour ago, twin6 said:

Gussied up Jordan, 1930.

Jordan.jpg

Way more than that, an advanced design of unknown origin, the Jordan Speedway Model Z Sportsman sedan, twelve built, no survivors.  Compare all the design feature on this Jordan and its 1930 contemporaries: full-length, over-the-cowl hood; long horizontal hood doors, free-stand fenders with lowered ends on the front, slanted windshield, and the major one, an integrated trunk 3-box configuration sedan before the 1931 Packard 845 Dietrich Newport sport sedans and the REO Royale 8-48 sport sedan.  The last feature may not seem significant now but consider this car had it eight years before the 1938 Cadillac 60 Special made it a production configuration and fully a decade before the 1940 GM C-Bodies the 60 Special inspired.  I'll go out on a historian's narrow branch and opine this design was free-lance work of either Count de Sakhnoffsky or Ray Dietrich.  It is that advanced.

'30 Jordan Speedway Z Sportsman Sedan.jpg

Edited by 58L-Y8
Design critique and comparison (see edit history)
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1 hour ago, 58L-Y8 said:

Way more than that, an advanced design of unknown origin, the Jordan Speedway Model Z Sportsman sedan, twelve built, no survivors.  Compare all the design feature on this Jordan and its 1930 contemporaries: full-length, over-the-cowl hood; long horizontal hood doors, free-stand fenders with lowered ends on the front, slanted windshield, and the major one, an integrated trunk 3-box configuration sedan before the 1931 Packard 845 Dietrich Newport sport sedans and the REO Royale 8-48 sport sedan.  The last feature may not seem significant now but consider this car had it eight years before the 1938 Cadillac 60 Special made it a production configuration and fully a decade before the 1940 GM C-Bodies the 60 Special inspired.  I'll go out on a historian's narrow branch and opine this design was free-lance work of either Count de Sakhnoffsky or Ray Dietrich.  It is that advanced.

'30 Jordan Speedway Z Sportsman Sedan.jpg

The only fault is that they should have done something design wise to better match the front door lower corner to the back door and/or to the hood slope line 

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Just now, John_Mereness said:

The only fault is that they should have done something design wise to better match the front door lower corner to the back door and/or to the hood slope line 

Only the front door cut and the hood cut lines aren't coordinated.  I suspect that was to allow the vent hood, but other than that, its a magnificent, advanced design mystery.

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The front seat passengers - have a few of you here ever been for a ride in a car of this era in that fold down front seat type? I have for a fair amount of miles in a Stevens-Duryea of similar vintage. It was when I was over about 15 years ago to Wales to visit Mike Worthington-Williams and family. Mike and I sharing the enthusiasm and ability to research and write - the Stevens -Duryea was owned by a friend of Mikes who took us for a great ride on a gloomy overcast day ( the usual weather coming off the Atlantic Ocean in that part of the world)  . Not much to hold on to and no seat belts of course, but great experience and fun. Yes, it was a bit of a white knuckle , open eyed ride ( I wore glasses full time then so didn't get any bugs in my eyes) . Once back in modern transportation we stopped at "Nellies" pub in town for several adult beverages to regain our fortitude after a excellent motoring experience in a pre War ( WWI that is) motor car.  AH Horseless Carriages - you just have to love them.

 

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2 minutes ago, twin6 said:

Roscoe Turner with his Packard.  The car was at IMS for years, and might still be there.

Roscoe Turner.jpg

Notice this 1929 or 1930 Packard is not only custom bodied, though has a 1932 upgrade to grill, lights, and bumpers (and a great mascot too)

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1 minute ago, 1937hd45 said:

'30 Jordan Speedway Z Sportsman Sedan.jpg

e55dc22eccc0c8a67fc52f7f9381b158.jpg

Yes! I was drawing a blank on the Stutz Weymann Monte Carlo when I was thinking about custom-bodied contemporaries to the Jordan Speedway Z Sportsman.  Thanks! 

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47 minutes ago, 58L-Y8 said:

Yes! I was drawing a blank on the Stutz Weymann Monte Carlo when I was thinking about custom-bodied contemporaries to the Jordan Speedway Z Sportsman.  Thanks! 

 

There are a couple of other ones too.   The M version of the Weymann may have the lowest greenhouse,  but they were all Zapron as far as I know (with aluminum not being an option until the DV32).

 

image.thumb.jpeg.589fd368dd7612e085963b0369ebf7e0.jpeg

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8 hours ago, John_Mereness said:

Notice this 1929 or 1930 Packard is not only custom bodied, though has a 1932 upgrade to grill, lights, and bumpers (and a great mascot too)


 

OK.....let’s separate the men from the boys....someone post a picture of Gilmore! 

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18 minutes ago, alsancle said:


sort of.

 

 

8FEBAA75-F1CB-4B29-B3CE-C62BDE3076E1.jpeg


 

 

Pry  your wallet open with a crow bar.......(terrible screeching noise like metal on metal!) and finish that thing. The Stearns is going into top gear in the next few days.....SEND THE BENJAMINS!!!   I’m feeling kind a lonely........ And I need some company, 😏
 

 

 

Snarky comment brought to you by lack of sleep and Myers Dark rum..........”good stuff!”, and at this time of the day, good enough!

Edited by edinmass (see edit history)
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2 hours ago, twin6 said:

NY 1927.jpg


This car, or it’s twin is sitting quietly in a garage where it hasn’t been disturbed for 60 years........except by yours truly trying to buy it. 

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http://triplettracehistory.blogspot.com/2019/12/roscoe-turners-1929-packard-while.html

 

In early 1929, Turner and his first wife, Carline, used the proceeds from his Hughes movie work to purchase this Packard from Douglas M. Longyear’s dealership Hollywood Motors Inc.  The car is identified as a ‘6-40’ which identifies it as the sixth series of Packard production built on a 140-inch wheelbase chassis. The car is fitted with a catalog #341 dual-cowl phaeton five-passenger body which means the car features no side windows but has a second cowl and windshield for rear seat passengers that was built by the Holbrook Company of New York.   

 

roscoe%2Btony%2Band%2Bgilmore.jpg

This photo courtesy of the IUPUI University Center for Digital Scholarship

Indianapolis Motor Speedway Collection shows left to right

Roscoe Turner, Madonna Turner, Mary Fendrich Hulman

and Anton "Tony" Hulman gathered around the stuffed lion "Gilmore"

 

Roscoe%2BTurner%2Bwith%2Btrophies.jpg

Roscoe with the Packard 6-40 and the three major US aviation trophies

that he won in his career. On the left the Thompson Trophy,

the center is the Harmon Trophy and at right is the Bendix Trophy

 
 
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  • gwells changed the title to Period images to relieve some of the stress

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