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Here's General George Patton in a big Packard during the VJ Day parade in Boston in 1945.  The Revere, MA fire department apparently traveled in style.  Every man in the crowd is wearing a proper hat, no backwards baseball caps.

 

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41 minutes ago, zipdang said:

Hmm. Jack Lemon and Tony Curtis... 🤭🤪

 I recall seeing this one posted somewhere else captioned as being Berlin prostitutes but the licence plate say that is a London, England,  taxi cab.

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On 8/8/2020 at 6:38 PM, edinmass said:

The Flying Wombat looks like the coachwork was done by an aircraft fabrication shop............who was the designer.......besides the owner......and who built it?

 

26CC855E-7547-42D1-8CD1-65F693EC512E.png


Ed,  I sdon'tr see that your 

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12 hours ago, 58L-Y8 said:

The very image of Edwardian elegance, madame 'taking the air' with the landaulette folded down.  The chauffeur's gaze fixed on the road, not to be noticed.

Interesting that the spare wheel-tire is carried on a roof rack.  Never seen that before with a vintage car.

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On 8/8/2020 at 6:38 PM, edinmass said:

The Flying Wombat looks like the coachwork was done by an aircraft fabrication shop............who was the designer.......besides the owner......and who built it?

 

This is one of the decent builds from B&S.

 

Which one of these two things is more attractive?

 

Pierce Arrow - Page 2 - CCCA - General - Antique Automobile Club ...

1938 Phantom Corsair: The Regret of a Car Ahead of Its Time ...

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On 8/8/2020 at 6:38 PM, edinmass said:

The Flying Wombat looks like the coachwork was done by an aircraft fabrication shop............who was the designer.......besides the owner......and who built it?

 

26CC855E-7547-42D1-8CD1-65F693EC512E.png

Ed,  I don't see that all of your questions about the "Flying Wombat" were answered. 
The car is on a Cord 810 platform and was designed by Maurice Schwartz and Rust Heintz of pickle family fame who commissioned it.  While it had the "Wombat" dubbing for the movie, in real life it is the Phantom Corsair, a one off.  A late friend who was a Cord expert here in Fairfax County, Va. worked on it in the late '40's or '50's when it was locally owned, and said he never could figure out why it was so fast.  It passed through various hands including Herb Schriner who made modifications to it.  A subsequent owner, probably Bill Harrah put it back to its original configuration.  I believe it still resides in what used to be Harrah's museum.

Edited by Dave Henderson (see edit history)
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Bill Harrah did have the car restored to the way it was when new and yes, as of  2017 it attended the annual meeting ( was driven from the museum to be put on display in the hotel the club's annual meeting was in) of a club held in Reno.

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AJ, have you ever seen the Wombat in person? The wheel is off center, so the 4 passengers in the front seat is a mess. It's not a car that was designed to be anything but a curisioty.

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33 minutes ago, edinmass said:

AJ, have you ever seen the Wombat in person? The wheel is off center, so the 4 passengers in the front seat is a mess. It's not a car that was designed to be anything but a curisioty.

 

Sounds like it is right in my wheelhouse!

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4 hours ago, George Cole said:

Interesting that the spare wheel-tire is carried on a roof rack.  Never seen that before with a vintage car.

Occassionally seen in European cars, but I think on this car it just proved convenient as it should be strapped down in some way or another regardless of where mounted. 

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I have owned Model-T Fords.  This is a scary photo.  "Four wheels, No brakes" is an old adage that describes the Ford T.  The brake band in the transmission is definitely a poor second to 2-wheel and 4-wheel brakes.  In the case of what this Model-T is doing, perhaps a "Perfect Drop Brake" in the front may be called for.  It's a bargain at only $4.00.

Ford T 037.jpg

Drop Brake Cycle and Automobile Trade Journal, Philadelphia, Jan. 1, 1908, p. 251.JPG

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33 minutes ago, LCK81403 said:

I have owned Model-T Fords.  This is a scary photo.  "Four wheels, No brakes" is an old adage that describes the Ford T.  The brake band in the transmission is definitely a poor second to 2-wheel and 4-wheel brakes.  In the case of what this Model-T is doing, perhaps a "Perfect Drop Brake" in the front may be called for.  It's a bargain at only $4.00.

Ford T 037.jpg

Drop Brake Cycle and Automobile Trade Journal, Philadelphia, Jan. 1, 1908, p. 251.JPG

 

Reminds of the time I was in a mine shaft in Nova Scotia - I noticed on the "man rake" (a cable hauled tram) that took us back to the surface via an inclined tunnel, (3,445 feet long at a 20.25% grade) that the last car was covered over and that connected to it by a single link was a steel bull pin with the pointy end thumping along the ties behind it. I discovered the last car was full of lead with the idea that if things started to go backwards in a hurry the weight of that car combined with the other cars would optimistically jam the bull pin in between the ties and stop the whole rig from making a messy crater 600 some-odd feet down in the shaft. Needless to say I was not too optimistic about it as that light at the bottom grew small and smaller........

 

Edited by Terry Harper (see edit history)
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This appears to be a 1911 Speedwell Model 11-H Semi-racing Roadster.  The attached B&W illustration is from The Automobile, October 20, 1910, pages 659-663.  An article titled "1911 Speedwell Automobiles" provides details about the 1911 models.  The 11-H semi-racer was priced at $2,700.  Using an on-line inflation calculator, $2,700 in 1911 equates to $73,268.62 in year 2020 dollars.

 

In case anyone is interested, the 1911 Speedwell article is in a google book, URL:  https://books.google.com/books?id=p8sqAAAAMAAJ&pg=PA948&dq=kissel&hl=en&newbks=1&newbks_redir=0&sa=X&ved=2ahUKEwj767HY6efmAhXMGs0KHeqPApQQ6AEwBHoECAEQAw#v=onepage&q&f=false

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11 Speedwell Model 11-H Semi-racing Roadster.JPG

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This is from an old thread on this site posted by "Grandpa" in 2008 which hopefully hasn't been added to this thread yet....

 

"Pictured is a 1933 Duesenberg Model J Judkins Berline, one of two made of this body type. This car was purchased new by Frank Yount at the 1933 Chicago Auto Show for his wife Pansy. She donated the car to a WWII scrap drive in the area of Lexington, KY. The car is pictured at the scarp yard with the tires removed for a more accurate weight. The J-xxx number of the car is not known. No identifiable parts of the car have been found.

If any forum readers have information or other photos of this car, please post them. I will pass the information on the Duesenberg historian Randy Ema.

If only I had a time machine.

Grandpa"

 

 

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This photo was taken in 1954. It is a photo of Bill Gent and his 1909 Stoddard Dayton 9K roadster. Mr. Gent was a friend of my father Plez Nance of San Diego. Mr. Gent help my father when my father was restoring his 1910 Stoddard Dayton Model 10K. I think this car is the same car that was owned by Joel Finn and acquired after Mr. Gents passing and is now in the Museum in Maine. At the time Mr. Gent had not completed the restoration of the car.

 

John

 

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BEC455D8-D134-4389-8A22-6E0CD6082213.jpeg

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After studying this photo for some time, it is possible / probable that this was photoshopped.  Back in the 1950s stunt drivers at county and state fairs would jump cars from one ramp to another.  The cars in those days had V-8 engines providing way more power and vehicle speed (velocity) than would be possible with the car in the photo.  Jumping / airborne cars lose velocity quickly resulting in the front end, with the heavy engine, dropping nose down.  One of the major dangers of ramp jumping cars was loss of speed / velocity at the launch ramp and that could and sometimes did result in the car impacting the receiving ramp.  Bad physical injuries and even death could result from ramp jumping.  Considering that the old car jumping in this photo has wood spoke wheels, plate glass windshield, and a wood frame body, it is difficult to believe this is real.  Seeing the distance the car has traveled from the take off dirt bank, logically the car should be nose down perhaps 20 or 30 degrees.  The car's probable flight path through the air suggests that it may well land on its nose if not on its top side.  The wood spoke wheels on the car should be turning very fast, yet it appears that they are not since the apparently stationary spokes on the rear wheel can be counted.  The image clarity of the supposedly moving car appears to be much better than the clarity of stationary objects.

 

 

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That "picture" has been discussed numerous times on many forums. The car has been superimposed photographically jumping over several things, including whole small towns. It was a popular "real"photo post card way back when, and has been altered and reused several times. Such post cards were quite popular back in the day. Photographically superimposed images offered post cards with street cars in towns that never had them, airplanes where they had never flown, the biggest fish you ever saw, and literally many dozens of other things. Traveling photographers offered such images altered to fit many small towns. 

When better versions of this image are enlarged, one can see some background through the spokes of the wheel. The rest of the car was carefully cut around to place onto other backgrounds, but what was behind the wheels remained.

 

Interesting to note. There were several traveling stunt shows that did actually jump automobiles in the early days. Such jumps (not as extreme as this one obviously!) were also done for Hollywood films, several scenes are considered famous in film history (usually the car was destroyed, stunt men in those days were NUTS!).

One of the most famous automobile jump traveling shows was in Australia if I recall correctly. Along about the early '10s, they jumped a one cylinder Cadillac believe it or not. I unfortunately lost the link to the story, but it really deserves a thread all its own. (My google skills stink!)

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11 hours ago, cessna195 said:

This photo was taken in 1954. It is a photo of Bill Gent and his 1909 Stoddard Dayton 9K roadster. Mr. Gent was a friend of my father Plez Nance of San Diego. Mr. Gent help my father when my father was restoring his 1910 Stoddard Dayton Model 10K. I think this car is the same car that was owned by Joel Finn and acquired after Mr. Gents passing and is now in the Museum in Maine. At the time Mr. Gent had not completed the restoration of the car.

 

John

 

4A1142C5-40D9-47AB-B8B8-004C5CCD1E72.jpeg

 

BEC455D8-D134-4389-8A22-6E0CD6082213.jpeg

Similar to the car in the Indy Museum:  https://forum.studebakerdriversclub.com/forum/your-studebaker-forum/stove-huggers-the-non-studebaker-forum/50341-orphan-of-the-day-02-28-1911-stoddard-dayton?49130-Orphan-of-the-Day-02-28-1911-Stoddard-Dayton=

 

Craig

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26 minutes ago, Walt G said:

A couple more to keep the flow going. Thanks everyone!

Walt

BodyType((14) 5 Passenger SEDAN 1923 Studebaker model EL Willoughby body028.jpg

Brewster1917001.jpg

BodyType(7)  CONVERTIBLE VICTORIA  - 1933 Lincoln model KB body by Brunn.jpg

 

I always liked those Brunn bodied victoria Lincolns.   There seem to be a few of them still around,  wondering how many were originally made?

 

1933 Lincoln Model KB

 

 

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Great Bob, thanks for that! Now we know what to expect at the Amusement park at Hershey for 2021 ! Way Cool. And the upside down part for a few seconds may shake loose some extra $ out of the pockets of the guys that are "thrifty" ( using formal proper description here so it won't get edited out) when it comes to paying for something that if it's worth $3.00 they will peer down their nose at you and state "give ya $1.38'

I only learned recently that they all work for a place named the Can-ya-dobedda Co. which is a division of Woodjoo Takeless Company. I wonder if anyone reading this has encountered those generous types?????.................

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Posted (edited)

Lincoln 1927 - from the Paris Salon souvenir program /catalog for October 1927.  A model L, "cabriolet" ( ie town car) with coachwork by Million Guiet.

Lincoln automobiles were fairly prolific in England and Europe compared to most makes of American manufacture. Lincoln produced sales catalogs for the European market

the one they did for the 1931 K series was a grand effort, wire spiral bound and cardboard covers with heavy stock pages. Nothing like anything ever produced in the USA.

There was a similar one for 1932 as well.

Other makes were WIllys Knight, Overland, Stearns Knight - plus a significant number of other  makes that saw some sales in Europe and England were Ford, Hudson, Buick , Studebaker Stutz , Franklin .

Motor Shows and Salons pre WWII era in Europe were held in London, Paris, Berlin and Brussels with smaller shows also held in other locations. I have a fairly complete run of most of those show souvenir programs (that are an inch thick ! ) It is so interesting to see where the showrooms were located and what makes were  near each other. This is a part of the American motor car scene that is rarely discussed or has photographs shown , or even advertisements like seen here. It is a major significant story that needs to be told....................

LINCOLN1927ParisAdvert.jpg

Edited by Walt G (see edit history)
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Walt, Your choice of selections from those European documents that illustrate the custom-bodied offering by all the American makes would be of interest.

 

 Million Guiet had that unusual method of modular body construction.  They also produced some of the most modern, striking custom bodies, wonder who their designer was?

Edited by 58L-Y8
Million Guiet (see edit history)
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Regarding a photo of a 1908 White automobile.  The passenger at right-rear appears to be Theodore "Teddy" Roosevelt.  The presidential election of 1908 brought in Republican president William Howard Taft, who defeated Democrat William Jennings Bryan.  Roosevelt chose not to seek a third term and stepped aside for his friend Taft.  Mr. Roosevelt wore Pince-nez eye wear, which was popular in the late 19th and early 20th centuries.  That type of eye wear pinched the bridge of the nose.  Roosevelt's Pince-nez had a support and safety cord attached on the right side; the glasses could be easily removed and left to dangle or safely be slid into a pocket.  The eye glass cord can be seen in the 1908 photo.

White Teddy Roosevelt.jpg

Theodore Roosevelt.jpg

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Roosevelt's home - Sagamore Hill is about a 40 minute ride NE of my house. Great place to visit, maintained by the federal government and for several years the local HCCA region then the local CCCA region had a pre war car show there once a year. It got to be the only pre WWII era car show on long island and then the CCCA region let thnigs slide because they didn't want to exclude any other car owner and post war cars were allowed to participate and the show went down hill as the pre war guys felt that there were enough shows around to cater to all car owners . At one time there were 60+ pre war cars at that show every year. Oh Well.

 

The Roosevelt home ,Sagamore Hill, in Oyster Bay , NY  is a great treat to visit and walk through - it is a time capsule of when he lived there.

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  • gwells changed the title to Period images to relieve some of the stress

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